Cart

Torso PDF, ePub eBook


Hot Best Seller
Title: Torso
Author: Brian Michael Bendis
Publisher: Published February 1st 2001 by Image Comics (first published 2000)
ISBN: 9781582406978
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

1264554.Torso.pdf

In order to read or download eBook, you need to create FREE account.
eBook available in PDF, ePub, MOBI and Kindle versions


reward
How to download?
FREE registration for 1 month TRIAL Account.
DOWNLOAD as many books as you like (Personal use).
CANCEL the membership at ANY TIME if not satisfied.
Join Over 150.000 Happy Readers.


Cleveland: 1935. Eliot Ness, fresh from his legendary Chicago triumph over Al Capone and associates, set his sights on Cleveland and went on a crusade that matched, and sometimes even surpassed, his past accomplishments. Dismembered body parts have started washing up in a concentrated area of Lake Erie Sound. Their headless torsos have left no clues to their identity or th Cleveland: 1935. Eliot Ness, fresh from his legendary Chicago triumph over Al Capone and associates, set his sights on Cleveland and went on a crusade that matched, and sometimes even surpassed, his past accomplishments. Dismembered body parts have started washing up in a concentrated area of Lake Erie Sound. Their headless torsos have left no clues to their identity or the reason for death. Elliot Ness and his colorful gang of "The Unknowns" chased this killer through the underbelly of Cleveland for years. As far as the public was concerned he was never captured. But what really happened is even more shocking. This award-winning collection includes a historic photo essay of the actual murders. Torso was nominated for an International Horror Guild award for best graphic story and for 3 International Eagle Awards.

30 review for Torso

  1. 4 out of 5

    HFK

    Bendis' Torso is based on the Cleveland torso murders that took place in the 1930's. 12 badly dismembered bodies, men and women, were found between 1935 and 1938, linked to be a work of an unidentified serial killer (in recent years the studies have suggested that the body count could be as high as 20, if not more, which would make the active years to be from the 20's to 50's.). Most of the victims were drifters, which made the identification nearly impossible in an era, and in an area, that had Bendis' Torso is based on the Cleveland torso murders that took place in the 1930's. 12 badly dismembered bodies, men and women, were found between 1935 and 1938, linked to be a work of an unidentified serial killer (in recent years the studies have suggested that the body count could be as high as 20, if not more, which would make the active years to be from the 20's to 50's.). Most of the victims were drifters, which made the identification nearly impossible in an era, and in an area, that had no fancy technology or registering system keeping up with the city's busy human traffic. Out of the 12 victims (7 men and 5 women) only one man and a one woman was identified: Edward Andrassy and Florence Genevieve Polillo. What made Cleveland's torso murders gain nationwide attention was not just the gruesome mutilation of the bodies that included beheading and castration, but the position of famous Eliot Ness as a Public Safety Director of Cleveland. Eliot Ness' role in the investigation was minimal, but he was part of the arrest and interrogation of the main suspect; Dr. Francis E. Sweeney. Ness also ordered the demolition and burning of the Kingsbury Run, the part of the city that worked as an hunting ground for the Mad Butcher. Cleveland's Sheriff arrested Frank Dolezal for the killing of Florence Polillo, which he gladly confessed. Too bad that Dolezal died in jail under suspicious circumstances, and had injuries that spoke for the behalf of him confessing due to being a victim of manhandling by the police. The main suspect is still considered to be Dr. Francis E. Sweeney, a cousin to Congressman Martin L. Sweeney who was also related to Sheriff O'Donnell by marriage, a man who had arrested Frank Dolezal for the third killing. Sweeney was a World War I veteran who had spend his time amputating and patching soldiers in the fields of war. After sparking the strong interest from the police, Sweeney soon committed himself, and spend rest of his life sending occasional and taunting postcards to Ness' family from his hospital confinement, actions that were similar with Mad Butcher's MO to place bodies the way Ness had an accessible view to them. I am not a fan of "based on a true story" oriented works as I have noticed it to include works that have very little to do with the reality whereas some are heavy on the factual side of whatever they use as an inspiration. I am happy to say that Torso sits strongly on the side of the latter, being filled with a lot of known facts that are masterfully blended with fiction that smoothly carries the story to its big bang climax. Torso is a work of crowded dialogue that uses daring, elaborate art and panel inserting that screams to be owned as an physical edition rather than digital version that is no way able to do the justice that Torso deserves, not to mention it being more challenging to read without seeing the full page decoration in your e-reader's screen. I am always in awe when black and white art can be so expressive and vibrant, especially when it is that very character-wisely. This is one of the areas where Torso really reaches its masterpiece potential, but the dialogue is either intentionally suffering from bad English to respect the surroundings and class division, or it has lacked a deep moment with its editors. This is hard to conclude by just reading the piece, it is too random and occurs insensible times to fully make it clear are we on the verge of great or on the verge of a lot of mistakes. Either way, I am recommending Torso to anyone who has a sweet tooth for history of serial killings and authority. Love towards great graphics is not a bad thing to have, either.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Wow. I first heard about this book by reading Bendis' "Fortune and Glory," his autobiographical story about his attempts to turn his comics projects into films. His description of this true-crime tale about Eliot Ness and America's first serial killer in 1930s Cleveland piqued my interest, but I couldn't seem to find the book anywhere. In the meantime, I read his Goldfish, which had similar art and a similarly gritty (though fictional) story; it was good enough, but not really my thing. This, thou Wow. I first heard about this book by reading Bendis' "Fortune and Glory," his autobiographical story about his attempts to turn his comics projects into films. His description of this true-crime tale about Eliot Ness and America's first serial killer in 1930s Cleveland piqued my interest, but I couldn't seem to find the book anywhere. In the meantime, I read his Goldfish, which had similar art and a similarly gritty (though fictional) story; it was good enough, but not really my thing. This, though, was just brilliant. The meticulous use of the landscape of the time period and actual artifacts from the crime heightens the realism while the in-depth character portraits allow us to grow attached to the players in the narrative. It's a great piece of history as well as a great story, and for that Bendis (and co-writer Marc Andreyko) deserves a lot of credit. And Bendis' art, which I found hard to follow in Goldfish, is brilliant here -- perhaps not technically amazing in terms of drafting, but the layouts and pacing are phenomenal, creative without being distracting, heightening the tension in key scenes. There's also a subplot I wasn't expecting involving a young detective; I'm not sure how much is owed to the history and how much is Bendis' (or, more likely, Andreyko's) invention, but they handle the plot with a delicacy I didn't expect, especially for this genre and this time period. All in all, I highly recommend this to anyone who likes Bendis' work, or anyone who likes true crime stories.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Devarsi

    I first got to know about Torso when news of David Fincher planning to adapt it hit me a few years back. Finally got around to reading it. The story is about the 'Torso Killer' who was active between years of 1934 and 1938. He was called so because all he left of his victims were their torsos. Then Cleveland Safety Director, the infamous Elliot Ness was on his trail along with his team of two very competent detectives - Walter Myrlo and Sam Simon. The case, to this date, remains unsolved. Yet agai I first got to know about Torso when news of David Fincher planning to adapt it hit me a few years back. Finally got around to reading it. The story is about the 'Torso Killer' who was active between years of 1934 and 1938. He was called so because all he left of his victims were their torsos. Then Cleveland Safety Director, the infamous Elliot Ness was on his trail along with his team of two very competent detectives - Walter Myrlo and Sam Simon. The case, to this date, remains unsolved. Yet again, like the Green River Killer, the artwork is B/W. But while the Green River Killer's artwork was bland (in a good way), very direct and simple, Torso's is really trippy and it gets under your skin. What's more interesting is, real B/W photographs of the crime scene and the investigation are often spliced into the artwork, lending an overall eerie effect. You get the feeling of 'Whoa, I am THERE right now!'. The artwork coupled with the writing was so intense I felt like I was watching a movie. They just complemented each other so well! The characters are brilliantly written and it is ripe for a film adaptation. Torso Killer is also probably the creepiest serial murderer I have ever been aware of till date. Brilliant work by Brian Michael Bendis!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Stanwyck

    "Well, Mr. Torso Killer, you know you are one bad apple, if even happy Hitler doesn't think much of you..." Brian Michael Bendis and Marc Andreyko are Cleveland area natives, and it shows. I, too, live in the Cleveland area, and so many moments throughout this graphic novel rang true. Granted, I was not around when the Torso Killer struck fear into the hearts of so many Clevelanders, but the representation of the city and its people is authentic. The novel itself is very cinematic. Several times, "Well, Mr. Torso Killer, you know you are one bad apple, if even happy Hitler doesn't think much of you..." Brian Michael Bendis and Marc Andreyko are Cleveland area natives, and it shows. I, too, live in the Cleveland area, and so many moments throughout this graphic novel rang true. Granted, I was not around when the Torso Killer struck fear into the hearts of so many Clevelanders, but the representation of the city and its people is authentic. The novel itself is very cinematic. Several times, it felt as though I was perusing the storyboards of an upcoming film. The dialogue is sharp, and the characters are believable. Bendis and Andreyko's manipulation of the form is incredibly intriguing. It made me pause to ponder how a film version would do the same, in its own way. If it's not already apparent, I would be interested to see a film adaptation of this novel.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sydney Squidney

    This chilling, noir-inflected true American crime tale concerning Cleveland's so-called "Torso Murders" (because that's usually what was found) is presented here in gritty art crafted with black and white graphics, infused with actual crime scene photos in a simple layout and is almost on par with From Hell as far as "true crime" graphic novel story-telling goes. For those who are unaware of what happened with Eliot Ness's career after Al Capone, Torso tells the story of the incredibly shocking a This chilling, noir-inflected true American crime tale concerning Cleveland's so-called "Torso Murders" (because that's usually what was found) is presented here in gritty art crafted with black and white graphics, infused with actual crime scene photos in a simple layout and is almost on par with From Hell as far as "true crime" graphic novel story-telling goes. For those who are unaware of what happened with Eliot Ness's career after Al Capone, Torso tells the story of the incredibly shocking and horrifying events in the 30s unfolded at the creepy and desolate Kingsbury Run, which was the grisly playground of the "Mad Butcher" from 1934 until 1938 and accounts the gripping hunt for the Ohio serial killer who was officially never named. The Cleveland Torso Murders, most of which the victims were brutally killed by decapitation while alive, were some of the most sensational crimes and were never solved. This is the story of how newly-appointed director of public safety, Eliot Ness realises that hunting this killer was not like battling organised crime. Bendis's delivery has a good pace, a lot of attention to detail, and there is an interesting sub-plot about a gay cop who has something to say on the matter of whether the killer was sexually perverted due to his equal number of female and male victims during a time when homosexuality was largely considered a "perversion". I really found this specific exploration of social issues part of the appeal of Bendis's telling of this sensational and super creepy unsolved mystery. The narration is not perfect, but I do consider Torso an excellent initiation for learning about the Cleveland Torso Murders, though it lacks some of the in-depth details involved with the individual killings, but which anyone can take upon themselves to further explore. I found myself actually creeped out while reading this, but I couldn't put it down until I had finished it and so overall, I give Torso 4 stars for being an uber-creepy primer, and ohh man, the ending.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    4 stars

  7. 5 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    The more you learn about your heroes, the worse it is. I know this probably seems like complete non-sequiter in this space, and it almost is. But it’s just a little bit not. Now, I know. I know it’s probably not fair to judge our writers on single instances. But it just seems to happen so often. I had a bad thing with Brian Azzarello. It was brief, I’m 100% sure he wouldn’t remember, but it hurt my feelings. There you go. A friend of mine had the same thing with Jason Aaron. And I don’t want to re The more you learn about your heroes, the worse it is. I know this probably seems like complete non-sequiter in this space, and it almost is. But it’s just a little bit not. Now, I know. I know it’s probably not fair to judge our writers on single instances. But it just seems to happen so often. I had a bad thing with Brian Azzarello. It was brief, I’m 100% sure he wouldn’t remember, but it hurt my feelings. There you go. A friend of mine had the same thing with Jason Aaron. And I don’t want to read his stuff because I feel like that’s not cool. And while I can read books by people who I SUSPECT aren’t cool, it’s a little harder to read books by people who have actually BEEN not cool to me and/or people I know. Now, by not cool, I might mean something different than other people. Basically, the people I’m talking about, they’ve been uncool in a setting where they should fully expect to meet some people. Why would you even do that if you aren’t a person who likes it? The people I’m not talking about are the people who we’ve sort of decided are uncool. I think Jonathan Franzen is a good example. I think we’ve decided he’s not cool. Or even a jerk. Let's have a huge, long, unnecessary un-takedown of Jonathan Franzen now. A Flavorwire article gives us 7 reasons why Franzen sucks. One reason is that he doesn’t like social media. Another is that the literary establishment tends to focus more on men, and Jonathan Franzen is a man. Another one is a trumped-up, totally false story about Franzen trying to scam videos from a college library, and the problem Flavorwire had is that Franzen responded to the false claim and showed that it was total bullshit. I’d say, of the 7 reasons, there’s 1 that might have some merit. The Wharton thing. Which we’ll get to. Gawker had a Franzen article. Which I clicked away from because I didn’t want to watch a 15-second ad for some bullshit in order to read an article that I think probably sucks. What’s the TL:DR for video ads? Because let it be known, I’m not waiting for a video ad to play before I read an article that probably has less actual content than the goddamn video ad, Gawker. And I probably won’t wait for a video to play so I can read an article I agree with either, Gawker. I find it quite fascinating that Franzen got a boatload of shit for his “Wharton Article Where He Said Edith Wharton Was Ugly.” For starters, Franzen talks a lot about the fact that Wharton came from privilege and money, and that she was quite socially conservative for the time. Which is something that a lot of us seem to be discussing these days. The “P” word isn’t “Peter” anymore, and I’m personally upset by that. Oh, how my star has fallen. You wanna read the offending passage? Here we go: [Wharton] did have one potentially redeeming disadvantage: she wasn’t pretty. The man she would have most liked to marry, her friend Walter Berry, a noted connoisseur of female beauty, wasn’t the marrying type. After two failed youthful courtships, she settled for an affable dud of modest means, Teddy Wharton. That their ensuing twenty-eight years of marriage were almost entirely sexless was perhaps less a function of her looks than of her sexual ignorance, the blame for which she laid squarely on her mother. As far as anyone knows, Wharton died having had only one other sexual relationship, an affair with an evasive bisexual journalist and serial two-timer, Morton Fullerton. She by then was in her late forties, and the beginner-like idealism and blatancy of her ardor—detailed in a secret diary and in letters preserved by Fullerton—are at once poignant and somewhat embarrassing, as they seem later to have been to Wharton herself. And later: An odd thing about beauty, however, is that its absence tends not to arouse our sympathy as much as other forms of privation do. To the contrary, Edith Wharton might well be more congenial to us now if, alongside her other advantages, she’d looked like Grace Kelly or Jacqueline Kennedy; and nobody was more conscious of this capacity of beauty to override our resentment of privilege than Wharton herself. At the center of each of her three finest novels is a female character of exceptional beauty, chosen deliberately to complicate the problem of sympathy. Last: I don’t know of another novel more preoccupied with female beauty than “The House of Mirth.” That Wharton, who was fluent in German, chose to saddle her lily-like heroine with a beard—in German, Bart—points toward the gender inversions that the author engaged in to make her difficult life livable and her private life story writable, as well as toward other forms of inversion, such as giving Lily the looks that she didn’t have and denying her the money that she did have. The novel can be read as a sustained effort by Wharton to imagine beauty from the inside and achieve sympathy for it, or, conversely, as a sadistically slow and thorough punishment of the pretty girl she couldn’t be. Now, I hadn’t read the famous Wharton Uggo article before this. But I have to say, I think that most online news outlets didn’t actually read this article. From my interpretation, Franzen is making the point that all writing is, to an extent, autobiography. And it’s telling to him that Wharton’s work had a lot to do with female beauty. In fact, I think this is an interesting quote, so let’s see it again: "To the contrary, Edith Wharton might well be more congenial to us now if, alongside her other advantages, she’d looked like Grace Kelly or Jacqueline Kennedy; and nobody was more conscious of this capacity of beauty to override our resentment of privilege than Wharton herself." What I think he’s saying there is that we allow beautiful people to be privileged. We don’t condemn them for their money and their power if they’re beautiful. We don’t resent them because, eh, they’re pretty. Who can hate a pretty face? I think it's also interesting that I talked to my partner about this, and she said, "Yeah. Beauty is a big thing for women." And she said it with an exasperated tone, like I'd said, "Hey, is oxygen like an important thing for women?" I could be wrong in my interpretation. But I think that saying Franzen’s essay was about Edith Wharton being unattractive is purposeful simplification and missing of the point for the sake of getting in 500 words and cashing a paycheck at a web site that does shit news. I feel like Franzen’s essay poses a literary theory about writing as the exploration of the self and the other, and about the way in which we value beauty, as a society. I didn’t feel the hand of judgment in Franzen saying that Wharton was unattractive. In order for him to pose this theory, it IS necessary to talk about whether Wharton was conventionally attractive. However, her attractiveness doesn't come in to play when he's evaluating the quality of her work. I guess I'm just an obnoxious asshole because I read the article. Even this part: "You may be dismayed by the ongoing underrepresentation of women in the American canon, or by the academy’s valorization of overt formal experimentation at the expense of more naturalistic fiction. You may lament that Wharton’s work is still commonly assumed to be as dated as the hats she wore, or that several generations of high-school graduates know her chiefly through her frosty minor novel “Ethan Frome.” You may feel that, alongside the more familiar genealogies of American fiction (Henry James and the modernists, Mark Twain and the vernacularists, Herman Melville and the postmoderns), there is a less noticed line connecting William Dean Howells to F. Scott Fitzgerald and Sinclair Lewis and thence to Jay McInerney and Jane Smiley, and that Wharton is the vital link in it. You may want, as I do, to recelebrate “The House of Mirth,” call much merited attention to “The Custom of the Country,” and reëvaluate “The Age of Innocence”—her three great like-titled novels." Anyway, what else does the modern media have to say about Franzen? Oh, Slate posted an article about how Jonathan Franzen sucks because he was becoming the face of birdwatchers. Fuck off, Slate. Do you remember when you used to be an important news site? When people came to you for alternative views on shit? Do you remember what it was like to publish stories about things other than nonsense by someone who dislikes Jonathan Franzen and then dislikes him further for daring to appear in a documentary about bird-watching? Oh my, and Franzen’s so bold as to say he feels like a “dweeb” when he’s birdwatching? What an asshole! What a complete and utter asshole for saying a thing that I would totally say about something like birdwatching. Birdwatching is totally for dweebs. Don’t get me wrong. I’ve spent about two weeks making things in Google Sketchup that ALREADY EXIST IN THE REAL WORLD. That shit’s for dweebs. Writing book reviews this goddamn long is definitely dweeb behavior. We love Wil Wheaton because he embraces being a geek, we love Big Bang Theory’s cast of unlikely herodorks, and we can’t get enough of Chris Hardwick’s empire, which is called NERDist. But for Franzen to call himself a dweeb for birdwatching. That, sir, is an insult on the level of classlessness. If only you could see that your words are as ugly as Edith Wharton’s face, Franzen. Let’s bring this back around. I try not to learn anything about my heroes anymore. Because, for the most part, it turns out bad. Except…damn it, when it turns out good, it turns out SO good. But I think all we can do is try to move forward and, you know, like the things we like as much as we can, in spite of what we might have heard about the thing’s creators. We talk about the responsibility of artists an awful lot. Whether creators are responsible for their audiences and the people who love their work, for the things done in their names. We talk less about our responsibility as consumers. I think one of our burdens, as consumers of art, is to let ourselves love the art. Which sometimes means fighting what we know about the creators, and even being purposefully ignorant. I'm not talking about ignoring crimes, but just general dickishness. And sometimes, Azzarello, we lose that battle. But that doesn’t mean that anyone who’s mean hasn’t made great art. In our current world, where we could probably find something dickish that ANYONE has done, it might be our responsibility to either overlook that which isn't truly heinous, and if we can't put that stuff aside, to not go digging in the first place. But I’ll say this, in caution to artists. Damn. When someone is trying to say something nice or appreciate you, don’t be a dick about it. I know it’s shitty when you feel like you can’t go out and have a cup of coffee without some nerd getting in your face because you write awesome comics. Actually, I don’t KNOW that, but I can imagine it’d suck. But fuck, man. Be kind. We love what you do. And sometimes we love what you do so much, or what you do was there for us in a time we really needed it, or something you did changed the course of our lives, and we need to say thanks. We can’t keep it in. Maybe we won’t see you again, and we have to take the chance. Don’t get me wrong. I’m not trying to force you to sign autographs and give out hugs. I’m just telling you that when you’re not very nice to someone who I care about, that shit ripples. That person is disappointed, and I’m disappointed, and while I’m reading your pretty good book about real-life mutilation and murder, personal favorite subjects, I can’t help but remember the time you were kind of a dick to my friend. What I’m saying is, I love your work, and it’s art, and the way you behave for the rest of your life can either help that feeling or tarnish it, just a little. Let's make a deal. I'm going to do my best not to type in "Bendis asshole" to Google, and you do your best to be nice to people. Deal?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emilio

    Cansa y mucho.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Clay

    Meh. The story was involving enough, but the artwork proved to be extremely distracting for me to not give this another star or two. Every other page had repeated panels (or the same panel rotated or zoomed in to some degree). This was an interesting trick early on, but after a while it just became a point of aggravation for me. The height of this was six full pages of the exact same silhouette of Ness and a uniformed officer sitting in a car repeated seven or eight times per page. The only diffe Meh. The story was involving enough, but the artwork proved to be extremely distracting for me to not give this another star or two. Every other page had repeated panels (or the same panel rotated or zoomed in to some degree). This was an interesting trick early on, but after a while it just became a point of aggravation for me. The height of this was six full pages of the exact same silhouette of Ness and a uniformed officer sitting in a car repeated seven or eight times per page. The only difference in the panels was the cityscape photo background becoming lighter and lighter (dawn or fog burning off?) and the sparse word balloons of their conversation. The dark pages full of black ink were moody or "noir" enough (Bendis must have had the same supplier as Gerhard and Sim used doing Cerebus), but it was too hard to distinguish some characters between one page and another unless they were named in the conversation directed at them. It was so bad for me about 2/3 of the way through when an important scene comes up and I wonder if the character shown is the killer. It is made clear a few pages later that it was actually one of the main detectives on the case. Stick figures wouldn't have been any more confounding for me to keep track of who was who. And then there are all the twisty pages of panels and/or word balloon chains that force the reader to rotate the book in order to read everything for no apparent reason, again, swimming in a sea of black ink. There are some nice visual and cinematic techniques in evidence (e.g. the fade in and out at the start and end of chapters), and the story is engrossing enough for me to recommend it. This came highly recommended to me, so those others must have been able to get past the art quirks that diverted me so much.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Robert Beveridge

    Brian Michael Bendis and Marc Andreyko, Torso (Image Entertainment, 1997) Sometimes it seems like every city wants to claim a serial killer. Look at the number of municipalities who seem almost proud that Jeffrey Dahmer spent a portion of his upbringing in them; Akron, Ohio, just down the road from me, is one of them. A little closer to home and a little farther away in time, though, Cleveland was the home (and may still be...) of one of the most notorious serial killers active in the first half Brian Michael Bendis and Marc Andreyko, Torso (Image Entertainment, 1997) Sometimes it seems like every city wants to claim a serial killer. Look at the number of municipalities who seem almost proud that Jeffrey Dahmer spent a portion of his upbringing in them; Akron, Ohio, just down the road from me, is one of them. A little closer to home and a little farther away in time, though, Cleveland was the home (and may still be...) of one of the most notorious serial killers active in the first half of the twentieth century: the Torso killer. Bendis and Andreyko brought the Torso Killer, and Elliott Ness' hunt for him, to stark, ugly life in the series of comic books that has since been collected in this graphic novel. All those faults I found in Doran's A Distant Soil are absent here; Bendis and Andreyko know exactly what they're doing with keeping the reader up to speed with what's going on with each character, know exactly how much they can fit into any given page without overwhelming the reader's sensibilities, and did meticulous research on the case (living in Cleveland, it's kind of hard to get away from the details; the Torso Killer is one of our local public television station's favorite subjects). Only a piece of the ending has been shifted from the way the actual case went, presumably for dramatic effect. But the book does not just stop at the Torso Killer, delving into the private lives of some of the folks who worked on the case, as well. The result is a cast of well-drawn characters, a good (and faithful, for the most part, to the truth) story, intriguing artwork, a fine script, and a bang-up mystery. How can you possibly go wrong? *** ½

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Along with Frank Miller and David Lapham, Bendis spearheaded the crime comics movement of the 90s. Throughout the decade, he wrote and illustrated several now-classic thrillers including Jinx , A.K.A. Goldfish , and Torso. Based on the real life "Torso Murderer," a serial killer who terrorized Cleveland from 1934 to 1938, Torso unveils the last case of the post-Untouchables Elliot Ness. Bendis and co-writer Andreyko effectively convey the fear, frustrations, and chaos surrounding the notorious Along with Frank Miller and David Lapham, Bendis spearheaded the crime comics movement of the 90s. Throughout the decade, he wrote and illustrated several now-classic thrillers including Jinx , A.K.A. Goldfish , and Torso. Based on the real life "Torso Murderer," a serial killer who terrorized Cleveland from 1934 to 1938, Torso unveils the last case of the post-Untouchables Elliot Ness. Bendis and co-writer Andreyko effectively convey the fear, frustrations, and chaos surrounding the notoriously still unsolved case. The last crime work illustrated by Bendis, who later found more fame as a writer of and shepherd to Marvel's resurgence of the last decade, proved to be not only his most compelling work but arguably one of the finest true crime graphic novels ever produced.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sonic

    In the comics/graphic medium that I love so much, I have always said that good art can save bad writing but bad art can ruin good writing,...well here is the exception. The art is not that bad to be fair,... in terms of pacing, layout ancdcomposition it is really pretty good for black and white, but one can see that it is just not masterful, what with so many really gifted artists out there, so when I first looked at the book flipping through the pages and seeing the art,.. I groaned, ...but it In the comics/graphic medium that I love so much, I have always said that good art can save bad writing but bad art can ruin good writing,...well here is the exception. The art is not that bad to be fair,... in terms of pacing, layout ancdcomposition it is really pretty good for black and white, but one can see that it is just not masterful, what with so many really gifted artists out there, so when I first looked at the book flipping through the pages and seeing the art,.. I groaned, ...but it was written by Bendis so I knew I had to give it a shot,... Now the writing is not perfect either,... there was maybe too much of an effort to use dated slang to put the story in the context of the 30's when the "true" story takes place,..."Hey copper what's the skinny?" it just felt a little forced, but I gotta hand it to Bendis (and Andreyko) the writing is really good. Bendis's writing is always good. And the "true" story was too intriguing to deny as I found my self devouring the book the way I would any other Bendis book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Juan

    I went into this serial killer mystery in hope of enjoying a grand retelling of the Cleveland Torso killer. The graphic novel is a whirlwind of Eliot Ness arrival to Cleveland coinciding the serial murders of vagabonds residing in the makeshift shantytowns. When Hollywood and greater Los Angeles were riveted and terrified of the Black Dahlia murder there was an even crazier killer on the loose in Cleveland. Bendis paces the graphic novel that rivals any nighttime tv syndicate show, but his well r I went into this serial killer mystery in hope of enjoying a grand retelling of the Cleveland Torso killer. The graphic novel is a whirlwind of Eliot Ness arrival to Cleveland coinciding the serial murders of vagabonds residing in the makeshift shantytowns. When Hollywood and greater Los Angeles were riveted and terrified of the Black Dahlia murder there was an even crazier killer on the loose in Cleveland. Bendis paces the graphic novel that rivals any nighttime tv syndicate show, but his well researched dialogue shines above contemporary writers. It is like Bendis traveled back to Cleveland, picked up the lingo and sprinkled delicately over Torso. The drawback of the graphic novel is blink and you miss it ending. In real life the case remains unsolved, yet Bendis puts his take of what may had happen. His speculation is not as though out when compared to Alan Moore's take on Jack the Ripper in From Hell. Bendis shoehorns in a political cover up that only Frank Miller would appreciate.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Harold

    I think my expectations were a little too high for this true crime graphic novel - I was hoping for something along the lines of Alan Moore's classic Jack the Ripper tale From Hell (I sense a re-read of that one coming up). Here, the plot centres around a post "Untouchables" Elliot Ness hunting down a serial killer in mid-1930s era Cleveland. An intriging premise and some interesting period details couldn't save the book for me, though. Ultimately, the story just felt a little light and inconseq I think my expectations were a little too high for this true crime graphic novel - I was hoping for something along the lines of Alan Moore's classic Jack the Ripper tale From Hell (I sense a re-read of that one coming up). Here, the plot centres around a post "Untouchables" Elliot Ness hunting down a serial killer in mid-1930s era Cleveland. An intriging premise and some interesting period details couldn't save the book for me, though. Ultimately, the story just felt a little light and inconsequential - especially the abrupt ending. The actual artwork was another sticking point. I liked the stark, black & white drawing, but there were too many repeated frames and waaaay too much empty negative space on most pages. I felt like the whole story could've been told using half the amount of pages!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Doyle

    The only thing keeping this from a 5-star rating is the art, which I would describe as "just barely good enough to tell the story." The overly simplified blocky line art often depicts a man in a hat, nothing more. No pizzazz at all. Sometimes the exact same panel would be copied and re-used on the same page multiple time (especially during long conversations between two characters). Contrast these simple characters against the extremely detailed photographs that were used as panel backgrounds an The only thing keeping this from a 5-star rating is the art, which I would describe as "just barely good enough to tell the story." The overly simplified blocky line art often depicts a man in a hat, nothing more. No pizzazz at all. Sometimes the exact same panel would be copied and re-used on the same page multiple time (especially during long conversations between two characters). Contrast these simple characters against the extremely detailed photographs that were used as panel backgrounds and you've got some real distractions that pull you out of the story again and again. However, all complaints aside, the story is engrossing and filled with interesting characters. I took extra time out of my day to read the last few chapters because I couldn't wait to see how it ended.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brit

    There's a lot that I liked about this book. The dialogue is great, the characters are very well done and distinct. Then there are a lot of little things that really took me right out of the story, such as typos and panels that ran straight into the inner gutter. In a few places this latter problem was bad enough to make panels and speech bubbles completely unreadable. Also the art. As a stylistic choice it fits the story perfectly. Hard lines, all black and white, most of the time it's great, bu There's a lot that I liked about this book. The dialogue is great, the characters are very well done and distinct. Then there are a lot of little things that really took me right out of the story, such as typos and panels that ran straight into the inner gutter. In a few places this latter problem was bad enough to make panels and speech bubbles completely unreadable. Also the art. As a stylistic choice it fits the story perfectly. Hard lines, all black and white, most of the time it's great, but when all of your main characters are middle-aged white guys wearing suits, this sort of art can make it difficult to tell who's who all the time.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Nicola

    Fantastic!! I had never heard of the Torso killer before this graphic novel. The book uses drawings on photos from photo collections (the official files have disappeared) as well as standard illustrations to create help create the dark mood of the times. The eyes are particularly noteworthy.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Lorenz

    Cleveland is on high alert. Eliot Ness has been hired by the city to clean up the town, including the police. Meanwhile, two cops, Merylo and Zelewski get stuck on the Torso Killer case. Two kids found a torso on the beach, no head, no hands, no feet, no way to identify the victim. More body parts show up in the city, all from different victims. The public goes haywire and city hall puts pressure on Ness to stop the killings at all costs. This was interesting. I'd read about it in a nonfiction gr Cleveland is on high alert. Eliot Ness has been hired by the city to clean up the town, including the police. Meanwhile, two cops, Merylo and Zelewski get stuck on the Torso Killer case. Two kids found a torso on the beach, no head, no hands, no feet, no way to identify the victim. More body parts show up in the city, all from different victims. The public goes haywire and city hall puts pressure on Ness to stop the killings at all costs. This was interesting. I'd read about it in a nonfiction graphic novels not to miss post and since I'd read (or heard of) most of the rest, I thought I'd give this a go. Also true crime, hard to miss with that. The story is fascinating. Serial killers are the exception in violent crime, not the rule, and the time that this happened and the setting are wonderful. Bendis and Andreyko do well with the pacing of the story, but I had such a hard time with the panel layout and the super silhouetted black and white style that I was frustrated most of the time I was reading through. I did love the inclusion of real photographs and the informational section at the end of the book with pictures from the Cleveland police's archives.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Eliot Ness has arrived in Chicago just in time to jump in on a new case: a serial killer who leaves only the torso of his victims. With no heads or hands for identification, the case isn't going anywhere fast. Ness also has to deal with corruption in the police force, and has gone on a firing spree, which has pissed off the higher ups, including a man who wants this torso killer nonsense cleared up before he runs for mayor. Featuring actual photos of the city and crime scenes in the background of Eliot Ness has arrived in Chicago just in time to jump in on a new case: a serial killer who leaves only the torso of his victims. With no heads or hands for identification, the case isn't going anywhere fast. Ness also has to deal with corruption in the police force, and has gone on a firing spree, which has pissed off the higher ups, including a man who wants this torso killer nonsense cleared up before he runs for mayor. Featuring actual photos of the city and crime scenes in the background of the comics, the art had a stylized 30's feel to it. The dialogue was riddled with 30's slang, too, which gave a feel for the time period even if I didn't always understand exactly what was being said. Of course, this didn't have a very satisfactory ending, as the real torso killer was never brought to justice. This left you with a sense that you knew who the killer was, but the politics of the situation made it impossible. The dramatic climax would have been better if the art had been clearer. In any case, it was an interesting way to read about a true crime event.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mitch

    Pretty interesting. Set during the 1930s Cleveland Torso Murders and based somewhat on fact. Eliot Ness has moved from Chicago after busting Al Capone to Cleveland to become the city's safety director. A bunch of bodies start showing up minus heads and limbs. Interesting setting. Didn't realize there was a such a big shantytown on the flats due to an influx of people fleeing the depression who all thought Cleveland was going to be one of the first American cities to get back on its feet. My gripe Pretty interesting. Set during the 1930s Cleveland Torso Murders and based somewhat on fact. Eliot Ness has moved from Chicago after busting Al Capone to Cleveland to become the city's safety director. A bunch of bodies start showing up minus heads and limbs. Interesting setting. Didn't realize there was a such a big shantytown on the flats due to an influx of people fleeing the depression who all thought Cleveland was going to be one of the first American cities to get back on its feet. My gripes with the book stem from the artwork. While it's awesomely noir and adventurous, it was hard to tell one character from another and the caterpillar-esque speech bubbles were tough to follow. In the end, the story was a bit of a pfffft.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Yahel

    Honnêtement je ne m’attendais pas à ressentir un tel malaise en lisant ces pages. Les images accentuent cette gêne d’autant plus que les photographies viennent se glisser dans le contenu. à la fin tout un dossier est dédié aux recherches qui ont aidé à la création de ce livre, celui-ci donne littéralement la chaire de poule. Finalement c’est une bande dessinée que je ne lirais qu’une fois. Je n’aime pas être aussi mal-à-l’aise dans mes lectures. J’aime le réel mais pas quand il est aussi glauque.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Sheehan

    I enjoyed the story very much. Picked this up on a recommendation and did not know Eliot Ness was involved in the case. I did not care for the art style as much and found the flow difficult in places. Part of this may have been a publishing problem as some panels were in the crease and hard to read. Still I would recommend this to those who enjoy true crime stories and are not familiar with the case.

  23. 4 out of 5

    L J Field

    The Cleveland Torso Murderer claimed at least 12 victims in the 1930s. Bend is tells the story here along with a possible solution as to whom the killer might have been. This is an excellent 252 page graphic novel, in black & white that throws you into the time of the crisis. The dialogue is much better than most graphics offer and the artwork is just as Bendis imagined it, for he also illustrated the book. Four stars.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Heard Michael Andreyko talk about this on a podcast and I had to track it down. Uses Black & White really well, and is a great example of how true crime stories can be told in a graphic novel format. Would definitely recommend to anyone interested in true crime.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Flowers

    Really interesting read based on a real case. Even though I had to look some of it up, I enjoyed that it was written using the jargon and slang of the time. Also really enjoyed the real photos of people, news clippings, places and articles.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cassie

    Solid 2 stars, I really like true crime but this wasn't the full truth and I found the art a little lazy. Many frames of the same image. It was still a very interesting story, but it could have been done better.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nottyboy

    Taut, creepy and morbidly compelling If you liked movies like Se7en, Zodiac, Manhunter, and Memories of Murder, you'll like this. This is probably the graphic novel I've enjoyed most other than the adaptation of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessy

    *für die Uni gelesen*

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eujean2

    It was an interesting read and I see the talent in both the writing and the art ... it just wasn’t my cup of tea. (I’d rather be reading Bendis’ Alias.)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Guillermo Duplá

    Novela gráfica muy impactante. Gran lectura. Varias escenas se me han quedado muy grabadas en la mente

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

In order to read or download eBook, you need to create FREE account.
eBook available in PDF, ePub, MOBI and Kindle versions



Loading...