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The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy: A Handbook for Girl Geeks PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy: A Handbook for Girl Geeks
Author: Sam Maggs
Publisher: Published May 12th 2015 by Quirk Books
ISBN: 9781594747892
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Fanfic, cosplay, cons, books, memes, podcasts, vlogs, OTPs and RPGs and MMOs and more—it’s never been a better time to be a girl geek. The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy is the ultimate handbook for ladies living the nerdy life, a fun and feminist take on the often male-dominated world of geekdom. With delightful illustrations and an unabashed love for all the in(ternet)s a Fanfic, cosplay, cons, books, memes, podcasts, vlogs, OTPs and RPGs and MMOs and more—it’s never been a better time to be a girl geek. The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy is the ultimate handbook for ladies living the nerdy life, a fun and feminist take on the often male-dominated world of geekdom. With delightful illustrations and an unabashed love for all the in(ternet)s and outs of geek culture, this book is packed with tips, playthroughs, and cheat codes for everything from starting an online fan community to planning a convention visit to supporting fellow female geeks in the wild.

30 review for The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy: A Handbook for Girl Geeks

  1. 5 out of 5

    MLE

    I received this book as an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. To be perfectly frank, I saw the title for this book, got very excited, and clicked the approve me button before I did any research on this book. My bad, but it looked like something I really wanted. I consider myself a bit of a fangirl, and I was looking forward to maybe finding out more about some of my obsessions. Maybe some in depth articles about Doctor Who, or fangirl culture, maybe about what women bring to I received this book as an ARC through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. To be perfectly frank, I saw the title for this book, got very excited, and clicked the approve me button before I did any research on this book. My bad, but it looked like something I really wanted. I consider myself a bit of a fangirl, and I was looking forward to maybe finding out more about some of my obsessions. Maybe some in depth articles about Doctor Who, or fangirl culture, maybe about what women bring to the table, or female roles in different media. This, alas, was not what I got. I saw handbook for girl geeks, and didn't realize it was going to be an introduction for girls who want to be girl geeks. As an introduction it was adequate, but it was really only a shallow introduction. When the author talks about the characteristics of different fandoms it was very superficial, trite, and a bit stereotypical. Not all fans own the key chain, the wallet, the plushies, and gamers are a very diverse group. Also what about people who don't fit in just one group, or people like me who think fandom nicknames are silly, and divisive, and often times lead to fandom snobbery, and elitism. None of which are positive things in my book. It also lends credence to the idea that all fangirls are young, which is ageism, and not okay. What bothered me the most was the lack of focus. At times it felt like I was reading a book for middle grade readers, with tips on making friends and such. At others times it felt more young adult, and then there were parts that seem to focus on the 21+ crowd. If the author had chosen just one demographic, and geared the entire book at that group I think it would have worked better. The childish parts mixed in with the adult parts just felt a bit patronizing, and silly. Also the author's voice grated on my nerves. I understand the feeling the author was going for in her use of lots of bubbly, effusive praise, internet speak, and gushing, but it didn't work for me. It was too much, and it felt fake, and more than a bit overdone. Also a bit too much of the book felt like the author was trying to establish their nerd cred. It got old. Another small sticking point was the author's instance that everyone lived near something nerdy and cool. Sorry, but if you want to bet that I live near a cool old school arcade/bar, board game café, or other such thing, that's a bet I'm going to win. Not everyone has a college in their town, and, even if they do, not everyone's local community college has fun nerdy groups, especially ones that are open to the public at large. There are still those of us living in rural isolation, and to assume everyone lives in, or near, a more metropolitan area is a little presumptuous. One of the other problems I had was a bit too much of the sisterhood is awesome kind of stuff. I understand that it's a handbook for girl geeks, but not all trolls, and people who harass you online are going to be men, and not everyone who stands up for you is going to be female. Things are more than a simple binary, and I don't want to lose that to a girls good boys bad mentality. It wasn't a huge part of the book, but there were parts that seemed to fall into this simplistic view, and it irked me. Another small sticking point was the part where the author extolls girls to be the Doctor not the companion, and it made me wonder if the author had even watched Doctor Who. The Doctor's companions are an amazing, strong, talented, and diverse group. I'd be proud to be a companion. I think the interviews were a nice touch. It was nice hearing from a diverse group of women working in a variety of different industries, and genres. It was nice to see their unique viewpoints, and messages. It added a lot to the book, and would be nice, especially for younger readers. I appreciated the emphasis on fandom etiquette, and respect for those that don't agree with you. I've seen a bit too much fan shaming, personal attacks, and general nastiness to think it isn't needed. It makes me sad that there has to be such a focus on how to treat people who like different things than you do, but it's good to see it addressed. There were also some great resources, links, and new games, comics, and media to explore. Overall, this would have worked as a handbook for younger readers, if it had been tightened up a bit, been better focused, and given a bit more depth. Maybe the author tried to tackle too many things in this book, and narrowing it might have made it feel a bit more cohesive. PS - Rating your own book five stars is tacky, and turns this reader off.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam Maggs

    I hear the author has v. v. soft hair

  3. 5 out of 5

    Darth J

    But why, though? I hesitate to write this review because [dramatic pause] I am a man reading this. [Cries of “This book isn’t for you!!!!!” issue from audience, followed by an obligatory “I’ve been triggered” and “He’s mansplaining!!!” as people post angrily into their tumblrs about my gender confession]. All kidding aside, I wanted to read this book because I love fandoms, think Quirk puts out some of the most interesting books I’ve ever read, and enjoy Sam Maggs’s articulate posts on The Mary S But why, though? I hesitate to write this review because [dramatic pause] I am a man reading this. [Cries of “This book isn’t for you!!!!!” issue from audience, followed by an obligatory “I’ve been triggered” and “He’s mansplaining!!!” as people post angrily into their tumblrs about my gender confession]. All kidding aside, I wanted to read this book because I love fandoms, think Quirk puts out some of the most interesting books I’ve ever read, and enjoy Sam Maggs’s articulate posts on The Mary Sue. I was expecting something fun and fresh, and I’m disappointed at what I see as a missed opportunity. Instead of opening up a discussion and further validating that anyone can be a fan of something without having to justify they are a “True Fan”, what this book does is draw fangirls as squeeing poseurs in a disheartening light. Sadly, I can see the same people who harass women pointing to this book to back up their erroneous arguments and continue their double standards. Instead of helping the cause, it seems to make a mockery of fangirls—who already have a hard enough time being taken seriously in the first place. Further, a lot of this book is pure filler. There are lists and interviews and tips for obvious things like being prepared for conventions (and not being a jerk to celebs at meet-and-greets). There’s so much fluff that the only thing this book needs to meet a page requirement is changing the font size on the punctuation marks. I feel bad about not liking this book, truly. I am interested in many of the things that fangirls love, and I’d love to see more inclusion of women and minorities in these areas (without blatant sexualization of course; Come on, do we really need another female superhero with a boob window? It just doesn’t seem practical that an area right over the heart would be unprotected during a fight.) Would I love to see a Storm movie? Yes. Black Widow too? Hells yeah. More River Song on Doctor Who? Give-it-to-me-now.gif. Do I want to see more representation in STEM fields? Absolutely! All the ladies who truly feel me, throw your hands up at me. *Special thanks to Quirk books for providing me a free copy in exchange for an honest review*

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    SO GREAT! I would recommend this book to basically everyone. Read it, please

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I was sent this by Quirk Books and I loved it!! If you've ever felt like you've been a part of a fandom, this is for you! I loved how empowering this was, especially for women (and young girls too!) I love that she touched on Internet slang, popular fandoms, trolls, conventions, feminism etc. definitely recommend this to all my fanboys and fangirls out there!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Want to feel empowered as a fangirl? READ THIS BOOK. Honestly, fangirls catch a lot of flack, so it's nice to have a physical copy of something saying FANGIRLS ARE AMAZING. There is stuff about fandoms, conventions, fan fiction, feminism and more. Definitely a book that I will be pushing on any fangirl friend.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Read this review and more on my blog In a nutshell: A fun, cute read on geeks, fandoms and feminism. I have to start this review with a confession: I'm not a big fangirl. My big fandom - if something so general even is considered a fandom - is books, and within that there's specific novels and series that I love. I love a lot of things and I'm passionate about things that would warrant the "nerd" or "geek" label to a lot of people. I'm cool with that... now. I think it's great to be passionate abo Read this review and more on my blog In a nutshell: A fun, cute read on geeks, fandoms and feminism. I have to start this review with a confession: I'm not a big fangirl. My big fandom - if something so general even is considered a fandom - is books, and within that there's specific novels and series that I love. I love a lot of things and I'm passionate about things that would warrant the "nerd" or "geek" label to a lot of people. I'm cool with that... now. I think it's great to be passionate about things and I wish that in high school, I had more of a positive environment and attitude about that. Basically what I'm trying to say is that I'm no stranger to fandoms, etc. but I'm not necessarily too involved in that world. I blog on Tumblr, I read a lot of books and I get excited about stuff, but I don't go to conventions or cosplay or fangirl about much. (Sometimes I feel kind of bad about that, but I fangirl in my own way.) Honestly a lot of this book didn't necessarily interest me that much because of that. It was a fun read to flick through, where I enjoyed particular sections more than others, but really I'm not sure if it was all that necessary. I think that the case will more commonly be that readers will either not care about something featured in the book or already know about it because that's a big part of their interests and identity. I personally didn't get much from it, other than a couple of graphic novel recommendations (thank you for bringing Rat Queens into my life!) and a few 'YAY!' moments when I recognised a favourite (like Riza Hawkeye from FMA.) Overall I didn't get much from it. Maybe if you're new to the world of fandoms and all things geeky, this will work more for you. The two things that I particularly appreciated about The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy were the idea of being unashamed to love whatever we're passionate about and the feminist aspect. There's a lot about gender and nerd culture, and a lot of the attitudes surrounding it sucks. I can't like Star Wars because I have these body parts? Of course I'm pretending to like something for a guy's benefit. *sarcasm* While the feminism is pretty standard and there's a lot of room for expansion, it was an interesting element to the book and part of an important discussion. Other things I appreciated were the little sections by particular authors, as well as the inclusion of some diverse fiction. The recommendations section is pretty cool but really it's more of a basic intro that gives you a lot of space to explore more things. I can imagine this would be a lovely gift for the fangirls in your life, but honestly I doubt that it's something I'll ever re-read. It's cute for what it is and if you want a nice little book on nerd culture and standard feminism then yay. There's adorable illustrations too and I can imagine it being one of those books that's especially great in hard copy. Source: NetGalley I received this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  8. 5 out of 5

    Riley

    Super cute!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Full Review at Tenacious Reader: http://www.tenaciousreader.com/2015/0... This really turned out to not be a book for me. I found some things that irked me, very little amused me and nothing really informed me. I’m still a little unsure who the correct demographic for it is as it is quite basic in all the details (be sure to take water to that con!), so current “geek girls” will not find much in here they don’t already know either through experience or common sense. I suppose it could be used by yo Full Review at Tenacious Reader: http://www.tenaciousreader.com/2015/0... This really turned out to not be a book for me. I found some things that irked me, very little amused me and nothing really informed me. I’m still a little unsure who the correct demographic for it is as it is quite basic in all the details (be sure to take water to that con!), so current “geek girls” will not find much in here they don’t already know either through experience or common sense. I suppose it could be used by young girls who aspire to become “geek girls”? Young boys in hopes of finding a description of their dream fangirl? Or maybe just geek girls that have been too introverted to find their place, people that are super fans but somehow are completely unaware of events and online spaces where they can meet like minded people? It even has a sections that range form how to write fanfic to how to use twitter. Twitter? And Facebook? This is a guide for geeks that also includes instructions for how to use these forms of social media? Maybe it’s for Grandma Geek Girls? I am really not sure who is unaware of Twitter at this point. But never the less, I won’t go so far as to say there is no market or demographic for it. I am just firmly aware that I am not included in whatever that market may turn out to be. Now, I can’t help but comment on the section about Feminism. There are 5 myths that Maggs speaks to argue against. They are really examples of sexism and/or harassment in various geek communities. I will confess I have never been to a con and I am not a gamer. I may be online a fair amount and admin a genre forum, but I also avoid all the “scandal-drama”. So I may be the least qualified person to react to this section of the book. I don’t want to trivialize any single instance of sexism or harassment. It should NEVER happen. But, I guess my point is I prefer to focus on the positive and I don’t let the actions of jerks (that I know exist) define the rest of geek-dom. So for some reason I couldn’t help but cringe when reading this list because I felt like it came across as harsh rather than supportive. Now I will say the author disputed every single one of these myths with examples or explanations. But I still couldn’t get over actually giving some of these “myths” page space in the manner it was approached. I will also confess that I have never heard that “Feminist geeks hate men”. What? Evidently The idea that we hate men and want to take over the world is a bummer stereotype perpetuated by the media, and it harms our awesome fight for the future of humanity. Thankfully I read the wrong media. I have never seen a reputable media source claim that feminist geeks hate men. Ultimately, I think my biggest concern with this section is that it seemed to be more of an outcry about the injustices or misconceptions related to gender within fandoms rather than useful information on how a geek girl should handle a situation if they do happen to run into a case of sexism or harassment. If this is a guide for geek girls, why not help them by giving some good advice and support? It probably didn’t help that I couldn’t help but read this book and hear upspeak at times. I may just have a lower tolerance for the style it is told than other people, so to be completely fair, I decided to include a quote. People can choose for themselves if this speaks to them in a way that makes them want to read the book: "Being a geek girl is the best thing ever and here are all the ways you can do more nerdy things that are awesome and don’t ever apologize for it because you are the best person out there and I’m so proud of you and you’re beautiful." There were sections for all sorts of different types of Fangirls from LoTR, to Dr. Who, to Marvel to even my favorite: Game of Thrones. These sections contained several sections: *Defining Characteristics – which contained a list of supposed traits. *Key Accessories – A list of ways you could show your love for the book/movie/comic. It would include hair style and accessory suggestions. *How To Become One – a list of the obvious. Read/Watch said area the fandom is for. Seriously, why is this section necessary?? *Unending Debates – Common conversations or controversies within the fandom All this section did was help me realize I am just not “girly” enough to embrace a book that tells me what earrings or leggings to wear to help identify which form of fangirl I am. Actually, I’ve decided I am not a fangirl, I am just fan.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Adriana

    ARC provided by Quirkbooks via Goodreads. Not only does this book provide a comprehensive guide for how to break into fandoms, how to decipher fanfic speak, where to get your geek on, and how to use your geekdom to make the world a better place--all while written with shrewd wit, progressive terminology, and empowering passion--but this book does a spectacular job of encouraging girl geeks to reclaim the term "fangirl" and wave their nerd flag with pride. (Not to mention that this book contains ARC provided by Quirkbooks via Goodreads. Not only does this book provide a comprehensive guide for how to break into fandoms, how to decipher fanfic speak, where to get your geek on, and how to use your geekdom to make the world a better place--all while written with shrewd wit, progressive terminology, and empowering passion--but this book does a spectacular job of encouraging girl geeks to reclaim the term "fangirl" and wave their nerd flag with pride. (Not to mention that this book contains the single best description of Riza Hawkeye/Fullmetal Alchemist that I've ever read in my life. And that's when I knew it would be a five star book.) (Kidding. Mostly.) This book is smart, insightful, progressive, inclusive, and most importantly, inspiring. It's a tremendous resource for all current and future fangirls, exploring a wide variety of topics from how to make your first Con a smashing success, helpful hints for spreading the geeky love online (broken down by social media site), how to write the best fics, which episodes/movies/comics /books you shout start with in order to jump into a fandom, how to combat internet trolls, how to maintain critical distance, and so much more! There are even interviews with professional geek girls who have used their nerdy interests to leave their mark on the industry. Amazing! The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy will encourage you to love what you love with no apologies--to stay true to yourself and ignore the haters who doubt your nerd cred and to express your passion for whatever you love at every opportunity you get. What I love about this book (besides its informative and helpful advice) is how much it emphasizes the awesomeness of the worldwide geek community! It's a wonderful time to be a nerd, and the wonder of the internet allows us to connect to other people who love what we love now more than ever before! This book was a joy to read and it left me feeling invigorated and like someone finally gets it--like someone out there finally understands the value of unabashedly loving ALL THE THINGS. This book will leave all you fangirls feeling validated and understood, and it will leave you ready to dismantle the patriarchy one headcanon at a time!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Yodamom

    A book every sensible nerdish loving girl needs in her library. Okay I'll go a far as saying every intelligent gifted well rounded happy girl needs to maneuver the intricate world of awesomeness. If you don't own a copy well, your life is lacking. There it is, truth. What's inside that completes your awesomeness ? Talking geek Connecting with fellow fangirls Definitions Interviews Codes Deflecting trolls Dressing More, more more.... if you love it it's covered, I had this on my coffee table it was a hit A book every sensible nerdish loving girl needs in her library. Okay I'll go a far as saying every intelligent gifted well rounded happy girl needs to maneuver the intricate world of awesomeness. If you don't own a copy well, your life is lacking. There it is, truth. What's inside that completes your awesomeness ? Talking geek Connecting with fellow fangirls Definitions Interviews Codes Deflecting trolls Dressing More, more more.... if you love it it's covered, I had this on my coffee table it was a hit with women ages 18-50-ish, giggles, phones and old fashioned paper and pens came out. Shocking was the fact that the men folk were just as interested in it. Hint Quirk books I think the men folk want their own version. This book is on my gift buying list for this years giving

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alexa

    I will not be reading this book, Reason 1: Kat's Review Reason 2: MLE's Review You don't need a book to teach you how to be nerdy. You need to watch Star Wars enough that you can discuss why Padme should have been Mon Mothma. (I don't care what anyone says I'll go down with that theory!) You need to scream like a crazy person when you learn that they're remaking Sailor Moon or be surly as hell when you learn they're remaking Evangelion. (Freaking Mari Makinami should NOT exist!) You need find a vid I will not be reading this book, Reason 1: Kat's Review Reason 2: MLE's Review You don't need a book to teach you how to be nerdy. You need to watch Star Wars enough that you can discuss why Padme should have been Mon Mothma. (I don't care what anyone says I'll go down with that theory!) You need to scream like a crazy person when you learn that they're remaking Sailor Moon or be surly as hell when you learn they're remaking Evangelion. (Freaking Mari Makinami should NOT exist!) You need find a videogame you love and play it to death, no matter what anyone says about it. You need to know all Disney's songs by heart. Or not! The point of being a geek is being PASSIONATE about something, whatever it is. Is not about going to conventions, or owning merchandise, or loving whatever the hell someone else loves.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rita

    Initial thoughts: 1. Adorable illustrations! 2. For every fangirl out there this is a must read. 3. The writing was snarky and I loved reading this book. 4. Useful tips for several geeky things. Definitely have to check some of these out! 5. The recommendations on a lot of great female characters from TV shows, movies, video games, books and comics were definitely one of my favorite parts. Check out my full review on my blog!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    THIS BOOK WAS HEAVEN.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maria (Big City Bookworm)

    * An ARC of this book was provided to me through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review * “Cons are like black holes for your wallet, what with collectibles and Artist Alley and I must have that photograph with Matt Smith here have every money I have.” Change Matt Smith to Norman Reedus and that quote is honestly just one of the many funny and hilarious quotes that I can relate to within this book. I have recently seen a lot of people in the book community talking about this novel and when I s * An ARC of this book was provided to me through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review * “Cons are like black holes for your wallet, what with collectibles and Artist Alley and I must have that photograph with Matt Smith here have every money I have.” Change Matt Smith to Norman Reedus and that quote is honestly just one of the many funny and hilarious quotes that I can relate to within this book. I have recently seen a lot of people in the book community talking about this novel and when I stumbled across it on NetGalley, it was like it was calling my name and I just knew I had to request it. Right off the bat, this book begins with a list of some of the most popular fandoms in existence. Some that are relatively new and others that have been around for quite some time. I have now learned the proper names to distinguish the Game of Thrones television watchers from the A Song of Ice and Fire book readers (shout out to all of my Unsullied friends) as well as so many other creative names for various fandoms. This section was actually very insightful and gave me a taste for the humour and writing style that was to come throughout the rest of the book. What goes perfectly hand in hand with a list of popular fandoms? A list of popular fangirl internet lingo of course! From stanning to OTPs to head cannons and shipping, this list covers them all! It was hilarious to go through the list and recognize and read about the terms that I tend to use on a daily basis such as OTP (any #gallavich shippers out there?), but it was even better to learn about some terms that I had never even heard of before, such as stanning. How have I never come across that yet?! Once again, this section provided me with a lot more knowledge of the proper terms to use in terms of internet lingo. There are also a lot of mini-interviews with big name influential females such as bloggers, authors, television writers and producers, artists, actresses and so much more. It was cool to get a chance to view their personal insights on what it means to be a fangirl. This book offers so much more amazing information and content like the different online platforms to share our geekiness or how to deal with the different forms of online trolls. It provides very helpful information on how to prepare yourself for conventions and how to write your very own fanfiction. The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy offers a lot of fantastic content that is both beneficial and extremely relatable. Even though this book is marketed towards an obvious female audience, I personally believe that even males can learn a lot from this book and it is definitely worth checking out. The illustrations throughout the book are great and add to the fun and humourous feel of the writing style. This is a great book to flip through. You definitely do not necessarily have to read it in order or in one sitting. It is something that you can flip through and read chunks at a time. This is definitely highly recommended for any female who enjoys her fandoms and embraces her inner geek. * Check out this review on Big City Bookworm for bonus photos from my experience at conventions!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cait • A Page with a View

    Soooo to me, this is like someone telling me how to breathe... it's beyond common sense. But reading this book helped me see my way of life from an outsider's perspective kind of like some ethnographic study and THAT was super interesting. Anyways, this book is probably meant for middle schoolers figuring out who they are and what's out there. It could also be good to help parents understand you? The best part was this gem of a quote from Beth Revis (yesss to the YA fandom shoutouts in this book Soooo to me, this is like someone telling me how to breathe... it's beyond common sense. But reading this book helped me see my way of life from an outsider's perspective kind of like some ethnographic study and THAT was super interesting. Anyways, this book is probably meant for middle schoolers figuring out who they are and what's out there. It could also be good to help parents understand you? The best part was this gem of a quote from Beth Revis (yesss to the YA fandom shoutouts in this book): "Don’t ask for permission to be who you want to be." Thank you to the publisher for sending me a review copy!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mia Bakhthiar

    It's a cute read. Makes me excited to be a fangirl!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mehsi

    Received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review. 3.5 stars. I was delighted when I found out that I was approved for this book. The blurb sounded great, like the perfect little book for a geek/fangirl like me. My expectations were high and I had hopes for lots of fun fangirl stuff, some conventions and glossaries. However, it disappointed me. There was still a lot of fun fangirl stuff, fandom stuff, but sadly there were things I didn't like. Let me start with the things I liked. I Received this book from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review. 3.5 stars. I was delighted when I found out that I was approved for this book. The blurb sounded great, like the perfect little book for a geek/fangirl like me. My expectations were high and I had hopes for lots of fun fangirl stuff, some conventions and glossaries. However, it disappointed me. There was still a lot of fun fangirl stuff, fandom stuff, but sadly there were things I didn't like. Let me start with the things I liked. I loved the glossaries in the book, with what word/abbreviations meant. Things like: RPF (which apparently means Real Person Fiction), Femslash, Songfics. We also had a big chapter on the various fandoms, of course not all of them are mentioned, that would be impossible as for every tv-show/anime/manga/book/whatever else there is a fandom, be them big or small. But in this one they at least addressed the biggest ones (at least I would count them as the biggest ones). At the end of the chapter there is also a big list (without descriptions on the numerous other fandoms). I loved the parts on the trolls (I really laughed out loud at the description and it was great to see how spot on it was). Of course I really loved the counter attacks. I am sure a lot of people could use those as trolls are everywhere. Not all of the counter attacks are ones I would agree with though, so I would say use and be careful. We also have various interviews with writers, creators of things (sorry, I don't know what kind of stuff they create (could be games/tv/books anything really). There is also a huge part on how to survive and prepare for a convention. That one was really interesting, though most of the stuff mentioned didn't apply to me as the cons in my country aren't that big and we don't have a lot of the things mentioned (Like photoshoots? Signings?), but also our cons here aren't that big. The author describes cons that are seemingly huge. Still a lot of the tips are usable and interesting. There is also a whole planning list and what to do if you are going alone or in group. What to do when you meet up with people you met on the net and several other interesting tips and hints. I really like the Cosplay Directive. I really think people should read this one. Not only the ones that are the group that should read this book, but everyone. I have seriously seen so many things go wrong or people being treated like shit and I think this should really be printed out and posted at every con that has cosplayers. However, there were things I didn't like. If I had known that this book was so full of feminism, I wouldn't have applied for the ARC or even considered the book. No offence to all feminists, you are all free to do whatever you want. But I am not one that likes Feminism (and yes I am a girl). I like feminism in the way of equality for girls in school and workplace (like being able to study or getting the same pay as your male colleague who does the same thing as you do), but other than that I am actually getting a bit tired of the feminism stuff that is coming up all over the net and outside of it. I won't go further with it, as that is a topic that falls outside of this review, but I am really disappointed that apparently even in a book like this, we get the whole thing shoved at us. So yeah, those are parts I read through (since I have to review the book), but really disliked, and it also made me give this book a -1 star. Then we have the other thing that I didn't like. The book is quite U.S centred. There is a big chapter about all the wonderful, fantastic cons in the U.S and that is nice, but there is a whole world out there. You are now just centring it on one continent, not even that, since it is only North America/Canada(ish). And this is a shame. I know the U.S is a big, big country and a big, big thing in people's mind, but hello. Hi! Europe here. We also want to read your book, and we also want to know about our cons. It would have been fun if there was a part about the U.S and then also parts about the other continents/parts of the world. Like a top 5, or a top 10. We, in Europe, got some big and great cons. England, Germany and France have some huge cons that really deserve mentioning, and the same goes for Asia and other parts. Now it just feels off to me. Sure, I am planning to go to the U.S one day, but for now that is a) too expensive and b) too difficult (there are soooo many rules one must follow to get in the U.S). I wish the author had done a bit more research and had looked outside of their own country. The same also goes for the links she posts. A lot of those links are international, but most of the shopping ones? Does the author know how expensive shipping costs are to Europe or another part of the world? (Spoiler: Very expensive, not to mention customs.) Not to even mention that maybe those stores don't even ship to Europe or Asia or whatever other part of the world? All in all, I wouldn't really recommend this book. Maybe for some parts (glossaries, the basic con guide, fandoms), but if you don't like/feel uncomfortable with Feminism or with the lack of international stuff then I would suggest to turn away from the book. Review first posted at http://twirlingbookprincess.com/

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elevetha

    2 stars pretty much solely for the paragraph on Star Wars, all the times Stargate was mentioned, and the Enchanted Forest Chronicles recommendation. First off, who is exactly is this written for? It claims to be written for "girl geeks" but the sad truth is that, aside from a few references and comments you'd need to be in the know to get, this offers practically zero information that geeks, or human beings in general, wouldn't already know. At this point, is there anyone who considers themselves 2 stars pretty much solely for the paragraph on Star Wars, all the times Stargate was mentioned, and the Enchanted Forest Chronicles recommendation. First off, who is exactly is this written for? It claims to be written for "girl geeks" but the sad truth is that, aside from a few references and comments you'd need to be in the know to get, this offers practically zero information that geeks, or human beings in general, wouldn't already know. At this point, is there anyone who considers themselves to be a girl geek who doesn't know what Potterheads are?? I doubt it. Or who doesn't know to bring water and cash and comfortable shoes, even if you're cosplaying, to a convention? And Magg's brand of feminism was too strong for my taste. Not even really feminism, for most of it. Towards the end of the book, she states a general definition of feminism that was spot-on, but it didn't really mesh with the message strewn throughout the book, as the book as a whole tends to put women on a pedestal. Sure, some guys, geeks or otherwise, are bound to be jerks, but some girls, geeks or otherwise, are bitchy. We aren't these amazing incredible paragons of humanity. We shouldn't need to be told we're beautiful to be validated. And we certainty don't need to nay-say males in an attempt to prove our equality superiority. Her section on internet trolls was absolutely absurd and utterly laughable. I read the first few entries and then skipped over the rest. We had a Fire Troll and a Frost Troll and approximately 7 other ridiculously named versions of trolls, some of which were legitimate trolls and some that really weren't. One of such trolls was someone that will comment about grammar. The horror. Additionally, this is one of the most politically correct books to ever PC. I can't even. And remember: "You don't need to identify as female to read this book!!" That's really good, because I identify as hedgehog. *eye roll* It's essentially an mostly boring, and rarely amusing, overly feminist introduction to the world of fandom and internet.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Charley Cook

    Fangirl's Guide is the go to, need to know, access all areas book to all things nerdy, geeky and fandom related. Maggs talks about everything from trolls to the correct terminology for a die hard Dr Who fan (Whovian, of course). One of the best things about this book is the equal time and love Maggs puts into each and every fandom. No one nerdy thing is given superiority over another. You're a Trekkie? Awesome! Anime more your thing? Rock on! If only all geeky guides were equal opportunity, eh? A Fangirl's Guide is the go to, need to know, access all areas book to all things nerdy, geeky and fandom related. Maggs talks about everything from trolls to the correct terminology for a die hard Dr Who fan (Whovian, of course). One of the best things about this book is the equal time and love Maggs puts into each and every fandom. No one nerdy thing is given superiority over another. You're a Trekkie? Awesome! Anime more your thing? Rock on! If only all geeky guides were equal opportunity, eh? AS the name suggests this is a book aimed towards females. Maggs talks about the discrimination of women in the nerdy world but empowers and encourages the reader to look forward to the female strong future of the industry. Overall this is a great book for long term fangirls (we all need a new fandom to nerd out over right?) and brand new fangirls too (everything you ever needed to know about conventions is a particularly handy part!). The artwork by Kelly Bastow is a fantastic added bonus too.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lexie

    Here let's put it this way: I have several cousins, a niece and some friends who will be getting this for Christmas and their birthdays. I wish, I wish so very much, this had been around when I was a young fangirl trying to find my way thru fandoms. it's the kind of book that a reader may not read straight through. skipping around to reread parts that are relevant, or quoting the section that illustrates their point the best, this is a book that should encourage discussion. it's not an end all-- Here let's put it this way: I have several cousins, a niece and some friends who will be getting this for Christmas and their birthdays. I wish, I wish so very much, this had been around when I was a young fangirl trying to find my way thru fandoms. it's the kind of book that a reader may not read straight through. skipping around to reread parts that are relevant, or quoting the section that illustrates their point the best, this is a book that should encourage discussion. it's not an end all--its a gateway (drug) that should be the fangirl's manifesto.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marissa (Laudable Lit)

    Thanks to Netgalley for providing me a copy in exchange for an honest review. I'll be the first to admit it: I'm a big fan of "geek culture." Sure, it gets blown out of proportion most of the time, but what doesn't? Geek culture and its merchandise have a bonding power unlike anything else I've ever experienced. See someone in your class wearing a Triforce necklace from The Legend of Zelda (your FAVORITE video game)? BOOM. Instant connection! Two of my best friends originally caught my attention Thanks to Netgalley for providing me a copy in exchange for an honest review. I'll be the first to admit it: I'm a big fan of "geek culture." Sure, it gets blown out of proportion most of the time, but what doesn't? Geek culture and its merchandise have a bonding power unlike anything else I've ever experienced. See someone in your class wearing a Triforce necklace from The Legend of Zelda (your FAVORITE video game)? BOOM. Instant connection! Two of my best friends originally caught my attention because of the "fandom" accessories they wore in a couple of my college classes. The trait I love most about this culture is the ability of the majority it to be incredibly accepting of other people and their "geeky" passions. They can all relate to being obsessed with something... And, this is where The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy was a bit disappointing for me. Despite my rating, this review will mostly consist of critiques, so if you're not into that... sorry? No, I do not think the intention of the book was to exclude. I think the entire purpose of this book was to be INCLUSIVE and I could definitely see the heart of that. However... I was never convinced that the author was a fangirl herself and that, in turn, made me feel completely isolated. Every time the author talked about fandom (hint: it's all the time), I felt like I was on display in an exhibit... Like a tour-guide was talking to a group of onlookers, oversimplifying and giving false information about my lifestyle. Everything seemed very stereotypical and (quite frankly) childish. And let me just say: MERCHANDISE IS NOT A NECESSITY TO BE A "FANGIRL." The “internet speak,” I believe, was a mistake. It helped amplify the problems I already had with the book (distancing the author even more). One thing I did appreciate was the focus on behavior in fandom, specifically “fandom etiquette.” As I said before, geek culture can be incredibly accepting, but this is not always the case. I was glad to see the author talk about how respect should be shown. Just because someone doesn’t agree with you, doesn’t mean you should shame them! This is a lesson even adults could benefit from. Again, I could see that the intention of this book was very pure and innocent, and sections like this one would remind me of why I love fandom. Basically, I saw the author's heart, but it was not effectively shown. Disappointed.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christine (Padfoot's Library)

    Never has there ever been a book that speaks to the centre of my soul like this one. This book encompasses everything that I believe I am and even more. When I first heard about this book, I was over the moon ecstatic because there was a few Doctor Who references. If you don't know btw, I am a massive whovian. I am a whovian first, human after. I was incredibly excited about the concept about a book on fan culture and more so, a guide! Although it may seem easier to interact and socialize online Never has there ever been a book that speaks to the centre of my soul like this one. This book encompasses everything that I believe I am and even more. When I first heard about this book, I was over the moon ecstatic because there was a few Doctor Who references. If you don't know btw, I am a massive whovian. I am a whovian first, human after. I was incredibly excited about the concept about a book on fan culture and more so, a guide! Although it may seem easier to interact and socialize online and find people with common interests, in real life, it is a lot harder. I have found many awesome friends through the internet and those were mainly through fandoms. I also started going to conventions more often in the past few years. I've also braved wearing a DW dress while at grad school and I'm slowly showing my fangirl side outwardly more often, and reading this book I just had a permanent smile on my face the entire time. I loved this book and so many moments in the book, I just kept saying to myself: "Sam Maggs gets me. She knows." and it was such an awesome feeling. For my full review, please check out my blog: http://padfootslibrary.blogspot.ca/20...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Clair

    (A digital ARC of this book was kindly provided by the publishers via NetGalley.) I remember growing up as a geek. It was a slightly painful experience, growing up near the middle of nowhere and having absolutely nobody in my local area who was interested in the same things as I was. I could talk at length about Spider-Man, Kingdom Hearts, various obscure foreign movies, books, and more RPGs than you could shake a stick at, but absolutely nobody was interested in my hobbies. Not because they didn' (A digital ARC of this book was kindly provided by the publishers via NetGalley.) I remember growing up as a geek. It was a slightly painful experience, growing up near the middle of nowhere and having absolutely nobody in my local area who was interested in the same things as I was. I could talk at length about Spider-Man, Kingdom Hearts, various obscure foreign movies, books, and more RPGs than you could shake a stick at, but absolutely nobody was interested in my hobbies. Not because they didn't care, but, in hindsight, you have to remember that it was secondary school, and you were a huge outcast if you didn't go with the flow and watch the same sort of things the popular crowd were enjoying. Same way it is in most high schools, really. I don't particularly begrudge my former classmates for "not getting" why I still enjoyed cartoons and why a video game brought me to tears during one lunch break. (Yep, it was indeed Final Fantasy VII: Crisis Core. I'd imported it and completed it before the game was even translated into English, let alone localised for Europe. Get on my level, nerds.) I left secondary school in 2008, and of course, throughout my sixth form and university career, I've remained in fandom. I've watched fans migrate from fanfiction.net to AO3, from LiveJournal to Tumblr and Dreamwidth, learned all the lingo, been to conventions, and you know what? Fandom is a wonderful little world to get into, and it's gotten me to engage and analyse pop culture in multiple ways. 12 year old me, tentatively asking her parents permission to join a Sailor Moon forum, probably couldn't have imagined one day squeeing over a radio drama like Welcome to Night Vale or a webcomic like Homestuck, furiously sending theories back and forth to friends, even the silly little character headcanons that popped into my head. Why am I gushing on about my early experience in fandom? Because this book made me. It put a huge smile on my face, and it also made me realise -- fandom's become such a behemoth these days, that sometimes people just don't know where to start. Back in 2003, I had crappy dial-up Internet and had to order in my Spider-Man and Batman comics and trades at a slight mark-up whenever I could visit the next town over. Of course, nowadays there's multiple blog posts on books you might like if you liked the Harry Potter series, and you can easily search for "best Avengers comic to start with", but even with this wealth of information available at the click of a button, it can still seem rather bewildering to get into fandom for the first time ever. Maggs (who is also an associate editor for the Mary Sue) uses a very easy, conversational tone, backed up by lovely illustrations and interviews with famous girl geeks such as Erin Morgenstern, Jamie Broadnax, Kate Beaton, Beth Revis, Kate Leth and Victoria Schwab, and even a chapter which is basically a list of the most badass, feminist characters in all of fandom. (Shout out for including Lt. Riza Hawkeye, Captain Janeway, Red Sonja, Kamala Khan and Carol Danvers.) And a chapter on the debunking of various myths about feminism, and why it's important for anybody coming into fandom to be aware and critical of the issues that still plague large swathes of the industries that make our favourite books or comics or games. The book also has a guide on how to rock your first convention and have fun in cosplay. There's a huge list of conventions and events (mainly in North America, though), and resources for whatever you're into over a wide variety of subjects, from mathematics and science to music to books to video games. There's also a fairly comprehensive list of the best websites to bookmark as a geeky lady, and even the names that adherents of certain fandoms give themselves as a group. (Although, it may just be me, but I have never heard of a Puella Magi Madoka Magica fan being called a 'Madokie.’) Ever since I read Katherine Larsen and Lynn S. Zubernis' essay collection on the Supernatural fandom last year, I’ve found myself a little apprehensive reading fannish books like this. Simply put, there was a cringe factor in that book. Sometimes one can go a little bit too far in the name of fandom, you know? But, thankfully, this book sets the balance just right. One thing I also really liked about this book? Maggs brings up how to deal with trolls and other negativity within the realms of your favourite things. It's important that fangirls not suffer the wrath of the troll in silence, because silence is tacit approval. Exposing troll speech to the world reminds the public that these things are happening, rad geeky ladies are being harassed, and that's not okay. (Loc. 867) Girl power, sisters. Go fight that troll in the dungeon. (By the way, this book gave me a new favourite term for virulent atheist neckbeards: the Olog-Hai.) Of course, if you've been to multiple conventions and are a firmly established fan-writer in your circles, this book may not be the best for you. That being said, however, it's not just a guide that completely holds the hands of neophytes and ignores the long-time fans. You can still glean a heck of a lot of enjoyment out of this book, even if you feel you've been there, done that, and got the (geeky) T-shirt. Putting myself into the head of a newbie to fandom for a second, I would love this book. It identifies major fan groups, tells you precisely which comics and TV series to get into, and brings up how you can engage more in the online worlds of your favourite shows. Live-Tweeting, making gifs, writing stories, etc. Either way, it's a wonderfully fun read. It's a great guide for complete n00bz (as we supposedly used to say in 2004), and also enlightening and entertaining to older fans. (Also, newbies to fandom -- don't forget, you're here forever.) 4.5 stars. (This review is also available on my blog: ) (Also posted to the wonderful Bibliodaze!)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cristian (The Bookish God)

    I received a digital ARC of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks to Quirk Books! At the beginning of the year I told myself I wanted to read more non-fiction books in 2015, especially on writing, so when I saw this book up on NetGalley I immediately requested it. The cover stunned me and the concept sounded very interesting to me. It didn’t disappoint! The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy is the perfect handbook for every fangirls and fanboys to grace the surface of the Ea I received a digital ARC of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks to Quirk Books! At the beginning of the year I told myself I wanted to read more non-fiction books in 2015, especially on writing, so when I saw this book up on NetGalley I immediately requested it. The cover stunned me and the concept sounded very interesting to me. It didn’t disappoint! The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy is the perfect handbook for every fangirls and fanboys to grace the surface of the Earth. From mini-guides on every fandom to an in-depth manual on planning your convention travels! Let me say that this was one of the funniest books I’ve ever read and it’s a lot to say considering this is not even fiction! It had me laughing out loud at least once every chapter and because of this book, the people who were in the bus think I’m a crazy maniac now. So thanks Sam Maggs for that! Its pages are filled of winks to feminism and a lot of girl power which is great! However, there was a point in the book where I thought the views on feminism where a bit strong and that why it’s missing a star in the rating. Don’t get me wrong, I think feminism is a needed movement in today’s society and I can consider myself a feminist as long as both genders are treated equally and men are not put down in the process. I’m not saying the author put down the opposite gender though; I just needed to address that! On to easier and less polemic topics, the graphic work on this book was beautiful. The illustrations were hilarious and the design and distribution of the text and images were brilliant! I personally loved the little icons for each fandom; I mean the Harry Potter one is so pretty! FULL REVIEW @ http://thebookishgod.wordpress.com

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    What a great book! This is more of a handy guide to all things feminist and geeky than a collection of stories per se, but it's still well worth the read. Even myself, an avid geek feminist the past few years learned tons of stuff from this book - especially in the con section! It was also nice for all the kick ass lady recommendations in different forms of media & all the website recommendations - they'll both be super useful! This book will give all fangirls the feels - such a validating, What a great book! This is more of a handy guide to all things feminist and geeky than a collection of stories per se, but it's still well worth the read. Even myself, an avid geek feminist the past few years learned tons of stuff from this book - especially in the con section! It was also nice for all the kick ass lady recommendations in different forms of media & all the website recommendations - they'll both be super useful! This book will give all fangirls the feels - such a validating, important, cheerful book for all lady geeks to help realize their amazingness. 4.75/5 stars.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Murakami Akemi

    When it's not being condescending and elitist, it's just boring. Not worth the read whatsoever.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chloe (aka Crystal)

    I might change my rating later, but the short explanation for the two-point-five-stars is the fact that the author was shoving feminism down my throat as well as LGBT ships. And you can't forget the bad words. I might type up a longer review later.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    If you're a young girl or a grown woman and have tried to navigate today's world of social media you know it can by a daunting place. You'd never call yourself a fangirl or a geek in public because you'd be scorned or called a fake. So, this little gem of a book is for all of us. For the novice (or guy who want to understand his girlfriend, wife or daughter) it explains what being a fangirl is and should be. For the new fangirl or the fangirl finally shouting out her geekiness to the world, it's If you're a young girl or a grown woman and have tried to navigate today's world of social media you know it can by a daunting place. You'd never call yourself a fangirl or a geek in public because you'd be scorned or called a fake. So, this little gem of a book is for all of us. For the novice (or guy who want to understand his girlfriend, wife or daughter) it explains what being a fangirl is and should be. For the new fangirl or the fangirl finally shouting out her geekiness to the world, it's a fantastic guide book to navigating this wonderful world - online, conventions, comics, cosplay, gaming - anything that you're passionate about! If you already consider yourself a fangirl/geek and think this book is too simplistic or a waste of your time - I disagree! The book by it's very nature is full of great information and laugh out loud moments that should take you back to the beginnings of your own fangirl journey! We should all have a copy of this one on our bookshelves!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mandy Mcdonald

    This book was everything I needed in my life...and then some. I struggled hard core over the last year+ with the difficulty of knowing exaclty who I am and being comfortable in my skin. While my outward appearance played a part in the insecurities I harbor, being able to be openly proud of what I love, what I want in life, and where I am headed was something I had struggles with. I have always been a bit different and never fit into what most might consider the "cool" crow....and it used to both This book was everything I needed in my life...and then some. I struggled hard core over the last year+ with the difficulty of knowing exaclty who I am and being comfortable in my skin. While my outward appearance played a part in the insecurities I harbor, being able to be openly proud of what I love, what I want in life, and where I am headed was something I had struggles with. I have always been a bit different and never fit into what most might consider the "cool" crow....and it used to bother the hell out of me. But thanks to amazing people who've come into my life and things like this book right here, I no longer want to be part of a crowd of people who don't love and accept me for being exactly who I am. In this book I read about how to experience my first con like a pro, how to interact and appreciate all types of fangirls and their fandoms, how to understand lingo that I had never heard of before, and most importantly how to be 100% UNAPOLOGETICALLY myself. I am still working on not letting others opinions affect me and being happy in my own skin, but I'm getting there. And this book gave me the jump start that I needed to finally feel free enough to be me. If you are a nerd/geek/fangirl of any kind, and have ever felt like maybe you don't fit in or that others look down on you for your love of certain things, pick this book up. Read it cover to cover, pick out the pieces you think are most important, or just skim it and read the part that have some pretty awesome interview with well known geek girls. But pick it up all the same. I have no doubt in my mind that something in here is for you.

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