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There's a Wocket in My Pocket! PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: There's a Wocket in My Pocket!
Author: Dr. Seuss
Publisher: Published 2003 by Collins (first published 1974)
ISBN: 9780007169955
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

310272.There_s_a_Wocket_in_My_Pocket_.pdf

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With a host of crazy crackpot creatures, from wockets in pockets to waskets in baskets, this hilarious books helps young children set off on the road to reading. This delightful book forms part of the second stage in HarperCollins’ major Dr. Seuss rebrand programme. With the relaunch of 10 more titles in August 2003, such all-time favourites as How the Grinch Stole Christma With a host of crazy crackpot creatures, from wockets in pockets to waskets in baskets, this hilarious books helps young children set off on the road to reading. This delightful book forms part of the second stage in HarperCollins’ major Dr. Seuss rebrand programme. With the relaunch of 10 more titles in August 2003, such all-time favourites as How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You? and Dr. Seuss’ Sleep Book boast bright new covers that incorporate much needed guidance on reading levels: Blue Back Books are for parents to share with young children, Green Back Books are for budding readers to tackle on their own, and Yellow Back Books are for older, more fluent readers to enjoy. There’s a Wocket in My Pocket! belongs to the Blue Back Book range.

30 review for There's a Wocket in My Pocket!

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sophia Triad

    "Did you ever have the feeling there’s a WASKET in your BASKET?  Or a NUREAU in your BUREAU? Or a WOSET in your CLOSET? Sometimes I feel quite CERTAIN there’s a JERTAIN in the CURTAIN" Another amazing book by Dr. Seuss. A bit scary, a bit funny, a bit ridiculous, BUT very clever and with great lyrics and illustrations. For the brave little readers 🎃

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    We love this Seuss book, too. I am honestly relieved there is NOT a nook gase in my book case!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Grace

    The BEST Dr. Seuss book! LOVE it!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    sometimes i feel like there's a zamp in the lamp and im also quite certain there's a jertain in the curtain whoa

  5. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    Warning: despite the title, this book has very little to say about wockets. If you purchased this book hoping to gain insight into the ecology and habitat of the wocket, you will be disappointed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    Nonsense Rhymes 18 November 2013 I notice that some people deeply analyse the functionality of the book in how well it would work to help children to read and to understand the English language, and there are others that simply go on about how much they loved this book when they were a kid (and have probably not read it since then). Then there is me, who will read the book and then make comments about it in the same way that I made comments about Mister Dog: The Dog Who Belonged to Himself and Th Nonsense Rhymes 18 November 2013 I notice that some people deeply analyse the functionality of the book in how well it would work to help children to read and to understand the English language, and there are others that simply go on about how much they loved this book when they were a kid (and have probably not read it since then). Then there is me, who will read the book and then make comments about it in the same way that I made comments about Mister Dog: The Dog Who Belonged to Himself and The Three Bears. Mind you, I'm not going to be making any outrageous comments about this book other than the fact that while I think that it is stupid I still feel the urge to give it a high rating. This is what you would call a nonsense book – not in the sense of Alice in Wonderland nonsense but nonsense in the sense that this book is stupid. Basically it has a kid running around his house pointing out all of the weird and wonderful creatures that happen to rhyme with the item of furniture that then live on or in. The pictures are also quite silly as well, but as I said something is forcing me to give this book a high rating and I really do not know why. Hey, I liked this book as a kid, and I notice that I tend to prefer the Dr Seuss books to the Little Golden Books (and I have said more than enough on that already). The rhyme and meter are exceptional, though it is not hard to create a rhyme when you are basically making up all of the words that you are rhyming. Oh, who am I to complain – Dr Seuss is a very famous and much loved children's author and as such it doesn't matter how stupid his books are, he still made money off of them.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    and that Jertain in the curtain better start paying his rent or he’ll get thrown down to the cellar with the Gellars! Another wonderful play on words and sounds that my kid adores.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shannon (Giraffe Days)

    I'm completely unfamiliar with the original There's A Wocket in My Pocket! so I don't know how this differs, sad to say, but as it's quite the silly book and so much fun to read, I wouldn't mind getting the longer version too. It begins: "Did you ever have the feeling there's a ZAMP in the LAMP?" "Or a NINK in the SINK?" and so on. For each everyday household item or piece of furniture, Seuss made up a silly rhyme. There's the WOSET in the CLOSET and the BOFA on the SOFA, the GEELING on the CEILING I'm completely unfamiliar with the original There's A Wocket in My Pocket! so I don't know how this differs, sad to say, but as it's quite the silly book and so much fun to read, I wouldn't mind getting the longer version too. It begins: "Did you ever have the feeling there's a ZAMP in the LAMP?" "Or a NINK in the SINK?" and so on. For each everyday household item or piece of furniture, Seuss made up a silly rhyme. There's the WOSET in the CLOSET and the BOFA on the SOFA, the GEELING on the CEILING and the NOOTH GRUSH on the TOOTHBRUSH. To be funny, my almost-two-year-old son started saying "No" to the opening questions (quoted above), mostly because the first time he did it we laughed it was so funny, so of course now he says it even more! Whoops. But it's not just questions, it's the boy describing all the strange creatures he finds around the house, which ones he likes and which he doesn't (which ones are nice and which are not). I have no idea if the kids, who are still so young, actually think these are real "things" that you can find around the house, but either way they're fascinated and the rhymes seem to really entertain them. Plus, it's a lot of fun to read so I don't mind reading this one over and over!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gavin Abdollahi

    Ok, I think I'm being a little mean to this book. I'd like to give it four stars, it being a Dr. Seuss book and all, but... I can't. Cat in the Hat and the Lorax were good. Still a ramble of nonsense, but good. This, however... Was just too much. So, it's about a kid who lives in this house full of weird monster like things, and the whole story goes like: There's a wocket in my pocket and a nookbrush on my toothbrush and a dozet in my closet and a lish in my dish and a... Though, I have to say, he's Ok, I think I'm being a little mean to this book. I'd like to give it four stars, it being a Dr. Seuss book and all, but... I can't. Cat in the Hat and the Lorax were good. Still a ramble of nonsense, but good. This, however... Was just too much. So, it's about a kid who lives in this house full of weird monster like things, and the whole story goes like: There's a wocket in my pocket and a nookbrush on my toothbrush and a dozet in my closet and a lish in my dish and a... Though, I have to say, he's really gifted at giving his works a musical tone.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Well my nephew loves it, so good enough for me! Like other Dr Seuss books, wonderful to read aloud.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christa Harmon

    Okay so technically the six-year-old read this to me (SO PROUD) but I supervised and thus am counting it anyway.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Simone

    I liked the rhymes they were so funny!

  13. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Yet another fun and hilarious story from the mind of Dr. Seuss.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Katz

    i have read it and also read it many times to my sister -- she loves this book

  15. 4 out of 5

    Darinda

    A silly, nonsensical rhyming book. Entertaining for kids, but not one of the better Dr. Seuss books.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    I think this one was my fave for awhile. The made up words were fun.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Aneesa

    This guy can get away with anything.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Leland T-Money Fortier

    Apparently making up words is the key to becoming famous: Dr. Seuss, Red Hot Chili Peppers, scat jazz, Donald Trump. Dr. Seuss has once again tried to slip some innuendos into his books, making them unsafe for childrens' eyes and ears. This book was to be followed by a sequel titled "Is that a wocket in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?"

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lanie

    Art is beyond adorable & all the names of the wacky little critters are so fun to say. The Insanity of dr. Suess is fun for both kiddies and adults reading to them. :) highly recommended.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

    Have you checked for strange rhyming critters in your house? We checked the entire classroom and never found a single nook, woset, or yeps though the search was terribly fun. Good luck at your house!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra Hunter

    These books are wonderful, imaginative and wacky. Lots of made up words, good for perhaps year 2 in establishing words.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aj Long

    This book has helped me fully appreciate the Jurtain in my curtain.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Holli

    All I have to say is I want to visit this guy's house. It sounds like a fun time to be with all those whatis around. Very creative and fun book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    C.

    Theodore Seuss Geisel achieved far better works with his full, elder children's stories than with these toddler ditties. "There's A Wocket In My Pocket", 1974 deserves better than two stars for the beautiful colour palettes of its artwork. The text is poor. Many quips repeat other pages. Instead of having a story or a point: there is nothing to this text. Not least, I continue to object to non-existent words, in books believed to be vocabulary resources for children. This book is about creatures Theodore Seuss Geisel achieved far better works with his full, elder children's stories than with these toddler ditties. "There's A Wocket In My Pocket", 1974 deserves better than two stars for the beautiful colour palettes of its artwork. The text is poor. Many quips repeat other pages. Instead of having a story or a point: there is nothing to this text. Not least, I continue to object to non-existent words, in books believed to be vocabulary resources for children. This book is about creatures who reside in all manner of furniture, implements, and any old place in this boy's house. Some he resents, others are inconveniences to which he is resigned, the most emotionally provocative instance is a creature dwelling under their living room carpet that he fears. The dark mood, face showing trepidation, and sombre, rich colours of this page make my favourite picture. Some creatures he loves. Unfortunately "trepidation" and "sombre" are never words a child would learn from "Dr. Seuss"! I admire his gift for dreaming-up uncanny creatures and hangouts and how they will fit into those impossible places; even upon this boy's toothbrush! I could understand a few made-up names for a few made-up creatures. It is a shame all rhyming depends on invention and I outright deem one page deplorable, for fully containing false vocabulary and solely one veritable word! They are: "tellar", "nellar", "gellar", "dellar", "bellar", "wellar", zellar", "CELLAR"! That sinks its merits to an abysmally weak teaching tool. Where Theodore shines is as an artist; even in toddler books such as these. In authentic stories, like "Horton Hears A Who" and "How The Grinch Stole Christmas", there are outstandingly perceptive messages that are not only encouraging but profound and enlightening. I don't hesitate to praise and recommend special, humanity-enlightening published works like those.

  25. 4 out of 5

    DadReads

    Did you ever have the feeling there’s a WASKET in your BASKET? Did you ever get the feeling that the DOC had WRITER’S BLOCK? Dr Seuss was a favourite of mine when I was little. The Cat in the Hat. Classic. Fox in Socks. Great fun. But he was also incredibly prolific, writing more than 60 children’s books. Only now do I realise how few of them I’ve actually read. So tonight’s bedtime story is a Dr Seuss work that is new to me: There’s a Wocket in My Pocket. This was written in 1974, when the Doc wa Did you ever have the feeling there’s a WASKET in your BASKET? Did you ever get the feeling that the DOC had WRITER’S BLOCK? Dr Seuss was a favourite of mine when I was little. The Cat in the Hat. Classic. Fox in Socks. Great fun. But he was also incredibly prolific, writing more than 60 children’s books. Only now do I realise how few of them I’ve actually read. So tonight’s bedtime story is a Dr Seuss work that is new to me: There’s a Wocket in My Pocket. This was written in 1974, when the Doc was 70 years old and firmly established as a legend of children’s literature. Arguably the biggest name in the genre. And so he said to himself: “Fuck it, I’m Dr Seuss, I can rhyme any old shit and people will buy it.” That's about the only explanation for the lack of effort that went into There’s a Wocket in My Pocket. This was Dr Seuss bereft of ideas, phoning it in. You can just picture him sitting at his desk, on deadline, looking around his house in desperation. What rhymes with bureau? Nothing. What rhymes with toothbrush? Nothing. What rhymes with chimney? Nothing. Damn, I’d better make some words up. There’s a ... nureau in my bureau. Yeah, that’ll do. And a ... nooth grush on my toothbrush. Not my best work, but hey, I wrote The Cat in the Hat. What are they gonna say? A quimney up the chimney. Hey, this is easy. It seems appropriate this book was first published by Random House. Some Dr Seuss works had important moral lessons, some were great vocabulary builders, others were just a lot of fun. And some, like this, were utter gibberish. Still, I suppose there is a hidden message. Don’t rest on your laurels. http://dadreads.blogspot.com.au/2016/04/theres-wocket-in-my-pocket-by-dr-seuss.html

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chris Mills

    The rhyming rhythm and silly and humorous concepts are what makes There’s a Wocket in my Pocket such a special picture book. The story depicts a young boy who visits different rooms in his house only to find crazy-looking creatures, some of which he likes and others that he doesn’t, hiding in cupboards, behind curtains, and up the chimney. The boy hopes to remain with the friendly creatures and never leave the house. The concept I like most about the book is the creative rhyming and timing of eac The rhyming rhythm and silly and humorous concepts are what makes There’s a Wocket in my Pocket such a special picture book. The story depicts a young boy who visits different rooms in his house only to find crazy-looking creatures, some of which he likes and others that he doesn’t, hiding in cupboards, behind curtains, and up the chimney. The boy hopes to remain with the friendly creatures and never leave the house. The concept I like most about the book is the creative rhyming and timing of each line and page, complemented by the free-flowing tempo. The poetic chorus on each page reads almost like a song which makes the book easily memorable and fun to recite back to others (something I remember doing). The tone is humorous and enjoyable for young children and the intriguing, fuzzy creatures, such as the “woset in your closet” or the “zamp in the lamp” ensure the reader is always kept entertained. There’s a Wocket in my Pocket is a picture book tailored for early years learners and beginning readers but can form much educational value in the classroom. As well as producing interactive rhyming words, the students can learn to play with words and guess the next household item from the rhyming pairs. In addition, the story can be used to help students with their phonics, timing and reading beat.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Folk

    Personal Response: I read this book “There’s a Wocket in my Pocket” by Dr. Seuss to my little sister and she really thought it was funny and she told me that it rhymed. I liked this book because it was short and gets a point across about what happens. Plot: “There’s a Wocket in my Pocket” by Dr. Seuss was about a boy who had a whole bunch of crazy things in his house. A couple of them were a wocket in his pocket, a wasket in his basket, a nureau in his bureau, a woset in his closet, jertian in th Personal Response: I read this book “There’s a Wocket in my Pocket” by Dr. Seuss to my little sister and she really thought it was funny and she told me that it rhymed. I liked this book because it was short and gets a point across about what happens. Plot: “There’s a Wocket in my Pocket” by Dr. Seuss was about a boy who had a whole bunch of crazy things in his house. A couple of them were a wocket in his pocket, a wasket in his basket, a nureau in his bureau, a woset in his closet, jertian in the curtain, etc. The whole book had so many things in his room and in his house and those weren’t even the ones that creeped him out there were more. The vug in his rug, the quimney in his chimney, and when the zall scoots down the hall. In the end he said there were a lot of things that he didn't want in his house. Characterization: The only main character was the boy. They didn’t name the boy but he was an interesting character because he dreamed of having all these things in his house and they all rhymed with the actual object. Otherwise he was a funny character. Recommendation: I recommend this to anyone out there who has a sibling who is a younger child. I recommend it because there are many types of poetry in it and they are funny.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ronyell

    “There’s a Wocket in my Pocket!” is truly a brilliant book from the creative mind of Dr. Seuss and it is about how a young boy tells the audience about the strange yet fun-loving creatures that live in a young boy’s house. “There’s a Wocket in my Pocket!” is definitely one of the greatest books about rhyming ever written! Dr. Seuss has done a splendid job at both writing and illustrating this book. Dr. Seuss illustrations are truly great and creative as he illustrates the boy with a red outfit an “There’s a Wocket in my Pocket!” is truly a brilliant book from the creative mind of Dr. Seuss and it is about how a young boy tells the audience about the strange yet fun-loving creatures that live in a young boy’s house. “There’s a Wocket in my Pocket!” is definitely one of the greatest books about rhyming ever written! Dr. Seuss has done a splendid job at both writing and illustrating this book. Dr. Seuss illustrations are truly great and creative as he illustrates the boy with a red outfit and spiky brown hair, which makes him a truly unique character in the book. Also, the images of the creatures themselves are creative, especially of the images of the nupboards in the cupboards looking furry and yellow and have cotton ball shaped heads. Dr. Seuss’ story is truly creative as the names that the boy gives to each creature is truly inventive as the names rhyme with various furniture that the creatures associate with such as the yeps on the steps and the vug under the rug. “There’s a Wocket in my Pocket!” is a brilliant book that children will easily love for many years. I would recommend this book to children ages four and up since the image of the vug under the rug might scare smaller children.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    As is typical for Dr. Seuss, this book combines simple rhymes with nonsense. There is great value for young readers in reading nonsense words. It teaches them to quickly and automatically sound out words they have never seen before. And there's not much plot. This, too, is an advantage - when you're struggling to read you're likely to lose track of what you've read by the end of the sentence. If you have to think back three pages for everything to make sense, well, that's frustrating! Some of the As is typical for Dr. Seuss, this book combines simple rhymes with nonsense. There is great value for young readers in reading nonsense words. It teaches them to quickly and automatically sound out words they have never seen before. And there's not much plot. This, too, is an advantage - when you're struggling to read you're likely to lose track of what you've read by the end of the sentence. If you have to think back three pages for everything to make sense, well, that's frustrating! Some of the words are a little difficult for VERY early readers - bureau springs to mind.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gerry

    Another delightful Dr Seuss offering in which a little boy tells of the strange creatures that inhabit his house. There are the Yeps on the steps, the Nooth Grush on his toothbrush, the Yottle in his bottle, the Jertain in the curtain and many more. All good fun and, as usual, well illustrated.

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