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Anges et Demons PDF, ePub eBook


Hot Best Seller
Title: Anges et Demons
Author: Dan Brown
Publisher: Published October 2nd 2007 by French & European Pubns (first published May 2000)
ISBN: 9780828868570
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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An ancient secret brotherhood. A devastating new weapon of destruction. An unthinkable target... When world-renowned Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon is summoned to a Swiss research facility to analyze a mysterious symbol -- seared into the chest of a murdered physicist -- he discovers evidence of the unimaginable: the resurgence of an ancient secret brotherhood known as t An ancient secret brotherhood. A devastating new weapon of destruction. An unthinkable target... When world-renowned Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon is summoned to a Swiss research facility to analyze a mysterious symbol -- seared into the chest of a murdered physicist -- he discovers evidence of the unimaginable: the resurgence of an ancient secret brotherhood known as the Illuminati... the most powerful underground organization ever to walk the earth. The Illuminati has surfaced from the shadows to carry out the final phase of its legendary vendetta against its most hated enemy... the Catholic Church. Langdon's worst fears are confirmed on the eve of the Vatican's holy conclave, when a messenger of the Illuminati announces he has hidden an unstoppable time bomb at the very heart of Vatican City. With the countdown under way, Langdon jets to Rome to join forces with Vittoria Vetra, a beautiful and mysterious Italian scientist, to assist the Vatican in a desperate bid for survival. Embarking on a frantic hunt through sealed crypts, dangerous catacombs, deserted cathedrals, and even to the heart of the most secretive vault on earth, Langdon and Vetra follow a 400-year old trail of ancient symbols that snakes across Rome toward the long-forgotten Illuminati lair... a secret location that contains the only hope for Vatican salvation. An explosive international thriller, Angels & Demons careens from enlightening epiphanies to dark truths as the battle between science and religion turns to war.

30 review for Anges et Demons

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessika

    Wow. Before I begin my review, I want to preface it by saying a few things. I know a lot of people think Dan Brown is a crappy writer who writes crappy books about crappy stories with crappy characters and crappy, unbelievable plots. I know a lot of people think Dan Brown is one of the best at the "cheese factor" and roll their eyes at his stories. I know a lot of people out there know more about European history, etc. etc. than I do, and therefore, I might not be the appropriate judge of this s Wow. Before I begin my review, I want to preface it by saying a few things. I know a lot of people think Dan Brown is a crappy writer who writes crappy books about crappy stories with crappy characters and crappy, unbelievable plots. I know a lot of people think Dan Brown is one of the best at the "cheese factor" and roll their eyes at his stories. I know a lot of people out there know more about European history, etc. etc. than I do, and therefore, I might not be the appropriate judge of this story. And I'm also aware that this is not the next literary classic. HOWEVER. I loved this book. Every time the action picked up in this book, I had a serious adrenaline rush. My heart raced, my eyes frantically read line after line, and my hands automatically went to my mouth. I was totally engrossed in the story Dan Brown told, even though I had already seen the movie. Watching the movie before the book is very uncharacteristic of me, but I'm glad that it happened that way in this case. Reading the book cleared up a lot of unanswered questions for me, and the book was different enough from the movie to keep me gasping out loud at plot twists. For me, I was hooked along for the ride, and even though some might find his twists unbelievable or even predictable, I was just in it for the story and found myself completely absorbed. I appreciated the facts (or "facts") throughout the story that were presented to the reader about the Illuminati, Vatican City, etc. and I loved the feeling of being on the inside of solving a puzzle while racing against time. I appreciated Robert Langdon's character, and I'm so glad they cast Tom Hanks to play his character because even when I read The DaVinci Code years ago, Tom Hanks is always how I pictured Robert Langdon. Pretty damn intelligent, resourceful, and witty. Dan Brown can be pretty witty, too, and I found myself chuckling from time to time. I even enjoyed the general mechanics of this book--I liked the short chapters that kept me coming back for more. They made it easy to fly through the pages. I would look down maybe after a half hour or so into reading and be 150 pages further in the book. The "dun-dun-dunnn" moments at the end of pretty much each chapter had me flipping, too, even though I could understand how some might find that worthy of an eye-roll or two. My favorite part of the book, besides the adrenaline rushes, was how he bounced from one point of view to another without leaving the reader feeling disoriented. Rather, it had the opposite effect for me, clarifying everything by being able to watch the story unfold from all angles. After reading The DaVinci Code a few years ago, I was a little hesitant to pick this one up...would I love Dan Brown as much (or more)? Or was The DaVinci Code a one-time deal? Well, I'm here to say that I can officially consider myself a fan of Dan Brown, however crappy others might want to declare him.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Arabey

    أولا الرواية دي لو حابب تتمتع بجد وانت بتقراها ليها حل من أتنين 1-Illustrated Edition تقرأ النسخة الانجليزية المصورة أو 2- وانت بتقرا أي نسخة تفتح جوجل صور وتكتب اسم كل مكان بيزوره روبرت لانجدون، كل قاعة في كنيسة او جدارية او تمثال وتشوف صورته علي النت ده صورة أحد أغلفة الرواية بيظهر فيها التماثل، ثيمة مهمة ضمن الأحداث .. لو قلبت الصورة حتلاقي عنوان الرواية بيقرا من فوق زي من تحت ثانيا، أعتبر الرواية تذكرة طائرة لرحلة مع بروفيسير روبرت لانجدون، أهلا بيك في الفاتيكان يمكن دي اول تجربة ليا لقراءة رواية أولا الرواية دي لو حابب تتمتع بجد وانت بتقراها ليها حل من أتنين 1-Illustrated Edition تقرأ النسخة الانجليزية المصورة أو 2- وانت بتقرا أي نسخة تفتح جوجل صور وتكتب اسم كل مكان بيزوره روبرت لانجدون، كل قاعة في كنيسة او جدارية او تمثال وتشوف صورته علي النت ده صورة أحد أغلفة الرواية بيظهر فيها التماثل، ثيمة مهمة ضمن الأحداث .. لو قلبت الصورة حتلاقي عنوان الرواية بيقرا من فوق زي من تحت ثانيا، أعتبر الرواية تذكرة طائرة لرحلة مع بروفيسير روبرت لانجدون، أهلا بيك في الفاتيكان يمكن دي اول تجربة ليا لقراءة رواية مليانة تفاصيل ومعلومات حقيقية سواء علمية او دينية او تاريخية او حتي اثرية وسياحية ..و كمان تحتل المعلومات دي اكثر من ربع الرواية او ثلثها بدون مبالفة رحلة يتخللها معلومات عن الذرات والطاقة والمادة...معلومات فيزيائية وطبيعية معلومات تاريخية عن طائفة الحشاشين، وعن التنويريين "اليمانتري" ورموز فنونهم وأصلهم و أصل الماسونية وعن صراع الدين والعلم في عصر النهضة..وعلي مدي العصور بعدها وحتي الأن معلومات عجيبة حقيقية عن الفاتيكان ، الدولة ومكتبته وتماثيله وغيرها كتير مش كده بقي وبس ده كمان كل المعلومات دي في اطار تشويقي فعلا يخليك مستني تعرف المعلومة اللي بعدها وتحاول تبحث عن حقيقتها او اصلها علي الانترنت عشان كده بنصح بالنسخة المصورة..لان صور الاماكن والاثار والاعمال الفنية دي بتساعد وبشكل كبير جدا في حل لغز الرواية نفسها...وعاما وصف دان براون دقيق ومسلي مش ممل بلاش المعلومات .. الرواية نفسها اللي خلطت الحقائق التاريخية والعلمية بقصة مثيرة واكشن ولغز بتدور احداثها في يوم واحد بس فكره رواية اليوم الواحد ده ممكن يبقي كارثة لاي رواية وباعث للملل او الفجوات لكن دان براون نجح انه يجعل الرواية مشوقة جدا مع عدم فقد الاحساس بالزمن ... بتسابق الزمن خلال اليوم اللي بتبدأه من ساعاته الأولي وبينتهي بمطلع فجر اليوم التالي .. وفي نفس الوقت الاحداث بتدور بدون اقحام الساعة او الوقت في كل مشهد ، بتكتفي بشكل السماء او ذكر الوقت في اوقات قليلة جدا بالنسبه للشخصيات رسم المؤلف الشخصيات بطريقة حقيقي مماثلة لتقديمه للحقائق اللي في الرواية..بتشويق..بعمق..بتطور في كل شخصية بيستمر علي مدار الاحداث وبيستمر كشف ماضيها كمان كل شخصية بتتعرف عليها خلال احداث الرواية بتعرف تاريخها وماضيها -بالاخص الابطال الاساسيين- وكمان دوافعها "قطرة قطرة" جزء جزء بطريقة تشويقية بدرجة كبيرة هناك شخصيات بالرواية الفيلم خسر كثيرا لعدم ظهورها او انتقاص دورها مثل الملك ماكس مدير الشركة العلمية المنتجة للمادة المضادة وحتي ايضا شخصيتي الفريق الاعلامي لقنوات بي بي سي بالنسبه للاحداث جرائم اختطاف وقتل لكاردينالات بالفاتيكان تتزامن مع انتخاب بابا الفاتيكان جديد بعد الوفاة المفاجأة للأب السابق مع رسائل غامضة مليئة بالرموز التي تعود الرواية متعددة وجهات النظر دائما تحتاج لبراعة في الكتابة لم يخلو بها هذا الكتاب هناك صفة مميزة ان بعد كل كام فصل "في تلك الرواية الفصول كثيرة جدا تتخطي التسعون فصلا" تجد شبه تذكير بأحد الاحداث..او بأحد المواقف او ابعاد شخصية ما اللي بيدور الفصل من وجهة نظرها التكرار جميل فهو قد يزيد من التركيز خاصا ان هناك الكثير من القطع في بعض المشاهد لالقاء الضوء علي حدث ما في ماضي الشخصيات سواء القريب او البعيد ..او قد يكون القطع بسبب معلومة تاريخيه او علمية او اثرية الا ان هذا التكرار كان يضايقني لان قرائتي الانجليزية بطيئة بعض الشئ "الرواية اخدت مني وقت بجد لكن المهم طلعت بحصيلة لغوية كبيرة افتكر اني عرفت مثلا اكتر من 10 كلمات مختلفة كلهم معناهم رجال الدين :)" هناك ايضا رسم وتفاصيل المؤلف للاماكن او الاثار المسيحية المكتظة بها روما والفاتيكان كان صعب احيانا تخيله لولا اني اقرا نسخة خاصة مصورة كنت تعبت بجد :( اما الافضل فكان النظام السينمائي المثير المكتوب به الرواية بالاخص تتابعات نهاية الرواية الذي شهد خلط مشاهد الفلاش باك سويا ومزجها مع الحدث الحاضر بطريقة غير مربكة بل مشوقة لدرجة تجعلك "علي حافه الكرسي" "حابسا لأنفاسك " لمعرفه ما حدث في الماضي بالظبط ادي الي هذه الاحداث و الصراعات النفسيه لاحد الابطال. الدين والعلم ------------ هنا بتتعرف علي علي بداية صراع دموي بين تزمت الدين والتنويريين لمجرد الخلاف مع جاليليو علي حقيقة الأرض انها كروية وليست مسطحة ونشأة المتنورين واختفاءهم بعيد عن انظار الكنيسة وبطشها لمحات عن الماسونية واللي بيكمل دان براون في روايتيه اللاحقتين تاريخهم بشكل أكبر ولا ننسي ان احد اشرار الرواية هو احد خلفاء فرق الحشاشيين , من اشهر الفرق التي اخذت من الدين ستار للعنف والبطش والقتل من روائع الرواية ايضا..خطابات الكامرلنجو "مش عارف معناها بالعربي بالظبط بس اللي هو راعي البابا وخادمه" اللي بيتكلم فيها عن صراع الدين والعلم .الصراع الابدي..من منتصف الروايه لاخرها هذا الصراع تم صياغته بطريقة ممتازة سواء في الخطب المباشرة او المواقف اللي مر بيها اتنين من اهم الشخصيات بالرواية في ماضيهم. يمكن عجبتني جدا في الرواية فعلا ان الاحداث كلها في يوم واحد لاني بعشق الافلام اللي بالطريقه دي "طبعا للاسف في الحاله دي انا حزين اني شفت الفيلم قبل قراءه الرواية " وتقريبا دي اول مره اقرأ رواية بالنسبه لي تدور كلها في يوم واحد وتكون بهذا الحجم "ربما فقط احسست ان الشمس لم تغيب الا متاخرا جدا يمكن ده العادي في روما" في النهاية دي اول رواية اقرأها لدان براون واكيد مش الاخيرة ..وتقيمي ليها بالرغم من انتقاص متعه القراءة بمعرفتي النهاية من مشاهده الملخص المختصر"الفيلم" الا ان مازال ان هناك مفاجات واثاره في الرواية و ايضا اعتقد ان تعاطفي مع الشخصية "المفترض انها شريرة" زاد بتتابعات النهاية. محمد العربي الاسكندريه 3 فبراير 2013 الي 16 فبراير 2013

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B-) 70% | Satisfactory Notes: The apotheosis of laugh out loud, so-bad-it’s-good writing, it’s at first enthralling but descends into garish absurdity.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    I read this after the drivel that is called "Da Vinci Code." I decided to give the author another chance, and take on something that maybe wasn't so formulaic. No dice. I am convinced that Dan Brown does absolutely no research into the subjects he writes about. Or if he does, he decides it is not "titilating enough for him" so he makes it up. I mean why even include actual real things in his books if he chooses to ignore any facts about them. Opus Dei? I doubt he could spell it. Catholic Church? I read this after the drivel that is called "Da Vinci Code." I decided to give the author another chance, and take on something that maybe wasn't so formulaic. No dice. I am convinced that Dan Brown does absolutely no research into the subjects he writes about. Or if he does, he decides it is not "titilating enough for him" so he makes it up. I mean why even include actual real things in his books if he chooses to ignore any facts about them. Opus Dei? I doubt he could spell it. Catholic Church? Has he even read any history about the Catholic Church at all? His descriptions of the Church seem to be based on whatever anti-Catholic propoganda he could find, Chick Tracts, and superstition. So it comes to no surprise that he has 2 massive bestsellers that are more or less, anti-Catholic. Cuz you know, Catholic baiting and prejudice to the Catholic Church is the only real acceptable prejudice left. The underlying superstition and hostility towards Catholicism, priests, the Pope, Vatican, etc is very close to the same sentiments that lingered in the decades and centuries before WWII in Europe. Think I am overreacting? If someone wrote these books but instead baited the Jews or Muslims there would be a huge outcry. Bashing Catholics and depicting them and their history in the way Dan Brown does in these books is outrageous and should be criticized and shunned. And I didn't even delve into how awful of a writer he is, did I? The only thing more embarassing than his writing that will never be remembered 20 years from now, is the fact that so many people bought into his piece of shit and wasted their time with it. Including respectable people like Tom Hanks and Ron Howard. There's time you will never get back again. Congrats!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Fabian

    And I am left STUNNED. Incredibly, this one is the one to top when it comes to adventure & history and pace & ingenuity. I've recently noticed how much history is revered (rightfully) by the modern authors. This is a different type of historical immersion. This is about bringing it to the forefront... something in the past is incredibly relevant, vital, to the present. Everyone but me had read this, & after Da Vinci Code--that bitch of an overrated heathen--I thought Brown was a phony And I am left STUNNED. Incredibly, this one is the one to top when it comes to adventure & history and pace & ingenuity. I've recently noticed how much history is revered (rightfully) by the modern authors. This is a different type of historical immersion. This is about bringing it to the forefront... something in the past is incredibly relevant, vital, to the present. Everyone but me had read this, & after Da Vinci Code--that bitch of an overrated heathen--I thought Brown was a phony (in company of Nicholas Sparks, among others). Not so. This is a MASTERPIECE indeed. I read this in like two sittings. All 710 pages of oversized print. I was sooo hooked I recalled many other lesser books that have riveted me. This one is so incredibly put together, it is no wonder Brown has been heralded by the general readership, ingrained in the zeitgeist. The awesomeness of this work lies in the battle between science and religion, perhaps one of the most seminal works about that topic. It explores this duality literally, symbolically... every which way. That they are married, both science and religion, is the thesis. Brown proves this with the precision of a skilled scientist. & with the heart of a devout... historian.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kiki

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. When I was in high school, I was group-travelling across western Europe and in the interest of saving money, we forfeited airfares for rail and coach. This meant aching backs, exploding bladders, and as much sleep as fifteen teenagers can muster while sitting bolt-upright on a coach driving up a clay-soil hillside with no crash barrier and overzealous air conditioning. Driving up from Rome to Paris, intent on salvaging as much daylight as possible, we took the night train. The night train! Doesn' When I was in high school, I was group-travelling across western Europe and in the interest of saving money, we forfeited airfares for rail and coach. This meant aching backs, exploding bladders, and as much sleep as fifteen teenagers can muster while sitting bolt-upright on a coach driving up a clay-soil hillside with no crash barrier and overzealous air conditioning. Driving up from Rome to Paris, intent on salvaging as much daylight as possible, we took the night train. The night train! Doesn't that sound like fun? Doesn't that sound like a huge adventure? "Best sleep I ever had," I was told. "You'll love the night train." I was lied to. The night train was like a bad mood on rails. In fact, just replace the word "train" with "mare" because that's pretty much what it was. We were stacked four to a room the size of a coat closet and forbidden to open our suitcases until we left the train. The bathrooms were like coffins with no toilet roll and seats that kept falling off, and doors that didn't lock, and the queues for the ladies' were like the fucking Danube. It was worse than the hole-in-the-wall showers with the saloon doors in Normandy two years earlier. When we got on the train in Rome, it was boiling hot. Even in pajamas, I was sweating. There were four duvets in our four-person room, but I was so unbelievably overheated that I donated mine to one of the other girls who complained about being freezing. The train rattled to a start, and I figured I'd get a great sleep. I'd be cool, and comfortable, and this would be the brilliant rest I was promised. Suddenly, the night train didn't seem so bad after all. I woke up halfway though Switzerland with feet like ice and rug burn from the carpet covering on my bunk. I sat up to try to grab a sweater from my suitcase but it was stowed where I had no hope of reaching it. The window had been left open, but I didn't know how to close it. I lay back on the bunk, sure that this was truly the worst sleep I had ever had. It was a non-sleep. It was worse than a non-sleep. It was a non-sleep with goosebumps and rug burn on my elbows, and what's more, afterwards, we spent an entire day zipping around Paris trying to keep our eyes open long enough to appreciate a dozen excruciatingly boring tour guides and this gross constant film of polluted city rain. You know, the kind that makes you feel filthy the second it touches you. Dan Brown is that person; the one who told me I'd have a great sleep on the night train. Though instead, he told me I'd really enjoy this book and that it was a complex, mysterious thriller. He lied, like the night train person lied. This book is the literary equivalent of rug burn on your elbows and trying to sleep in Switzerland with no fucking socks on. This book wants you to think that it's really adventurous and spiritual and intelligent when in actual fact it's like giving your duvet away, except your duvet is money, and trying to sleep on the bottom bunk on a rickety-sounding train with a bladder full of pee and a quiet certainty that the person on the bunk above you is going to break it, and you're going to be crushed to death with no bra on in a foreign country, except the person above you is Dan Brown. Picture this: Robert Langdon, Harvard "symbologist" (let's put a pin in that one) is called to CERN to investigate the murder of a scientist, and then discovers that the murder is connected to an ancient secret society threatening to destroy the sacred Vatican City and murder four cardinals in the name of science. Then picture this: a bishop falls in love with a nun and they really want to bump uglies but they're supposed to be chaste so instead of having sex they decide to conceive a child (because having a child is supposedly the only alternative to sex in proving one's love for another person) by IVF and then the nun gives birth to a boy who goes on to become the Pope's camerlegno, all the while unaware that he is in fact the illegitimate son of the bloody bishop of Rome. One of those scenarios sounds like a bestselling novel worthy of praise. The other one sounds like an episode of Nip/Tuck pencilled out on the back of a Booster Juice napkin by an intern doing pails. But both of them are true components of this garbage dump of a commercial novel that wants to think it's so clever and edgy but is in actual fact nothing but Europorn Indiana Jones fanfiction with a side of racism and just a sprinkling of good old fashioned bullshit. Because we love when certain authors twirl their mustaches and tell us all about how much stuff they know when in actual fact they can barely stumble through a single sentence without using the word "awkward" or describing someone's physical appearance with intensely invasive and sexual terms. Can we just take a moment to discuss Vittoria? Vittoria is the daughter of the murdered priest/scientist from CERN who was creating the antimatter that went into the bomb that intends to blow up the Vatican...to some end. I'm not 100% sure if there was even a point to all of this but let's roll with that. Vittoria as a character just kills me because not only does she constitute this massive book failing the Bechdel test, but she's this terrible walking trope of a character whose every single action is punctuated with "...the woman." Vittoria has a gun...and she's a woman. Vittoria is mad about something...and she's a woman. Vittoria is a scientist...and she's a woman. There is not a single moment wherein Vittoria's womanness is not commodified, ogled, fetishized or taken advantage of by the plethora of male characters surrounding her and patting her on the head while simultaneously noticing her tanned legs and cleavage as subtly as a baboon rubbing its bright red buttcrack up against a window at the zoo. Vittoria's only purpose as a character is to make Robert, our sanctimonious, self-righteous and highly overrated protagonist look like a hero. Is nobody else finding this insulting? Vittoria is sexualized to within an inch of her life and is then punished for it by a racially problematic villain who tries to rape her but doesn't succeed because Langdon, our plucky hero, swoops in and saves her. He is of course ultimately rewarded for this with sex because obviously, fellas, that's what's supposed to happen when you help a girl out. Held the door for her? You earned a blowjob! Helped her push her car in the snow? Expect sex! Chased away a leering predator who's making her uncomfortable? You ought to get your shot! You won, after all! Fair and square! And if she says no? Bitch! You're in the friendzone now. You'd better cry about it because she's being so ungrateful. We also have this terrible image of the "Hassassin" - a brown guy who's obviously evil and a sexual predator and totally perverted and twisted because...well, he's brown? Look, we all knew this character was going to be a terrible rehash of racist Islamophobic stereotypes. At the same time as fetishizing eurocentric women's lib we have Muslim women being scoffed at for their generally more reserved culture. They're literally called "livestock" and don't try to tell me that this is all part of the evil character of the Hassassin because (a) the portrayal of the Hassassin is racist in an of itself because he is one of only two characters of colour and he is pure evil (the other character of colour is a reporter for the BBC who has absolutely no moral compass whatsoever) and he is not invested in the cause in any way, thus his involvement boils down to white Dan Brown figuring "well, he's a rapist and a terrorist, so that must make him Muslim" and (b) the majority of people in the west actually believe that Muslim female culture is like that and that feminism involves charging into their country, ripping their niqabs off while screaming "I'M WHITE AND I'M LIBERATING YOU" which is only perpetuated by this supposedly worldly, well-traveled and suave killer. Bonus points for suggesting, with this huge stereotype of a character, that Muslim men have absolutely no respect for their female counterparts and are inherent abusers. Um, yay? (I absolutely love the lack of any research that went into portraying the BBC as the main body of press. We have these two BBC reporters looking for "scoop" and being generally tacky and invasive and this is just such an awful misunderstanding of everything that is characteristic of the BBC. British news networks are not like American news networks; they aren't jokey and cute and funny. They don't mutter about Syria for five minutes and then run a half-hour story about raccoons in Ontario. They're serious and somber and they cram as much world news as possible into about an hour of programming, which almost always includes some stony-faced reporter standing in the middle of a war zone delivering a status report. BBC reporters have been killed out on the field before. The thing about the BBC is that it doesn't need to be gimmicky to attract ratings because it's comfortably funded by TV licensing. The BBC do not look for "scoop" or sensationalize breaking news or act on anonymous tips from assassins or send two clueless idiots to an event as big as a papal conclave. It's so painfully obvious that, disregarding any cultural differences between America and Europe, of which there are hundreds, Brown simply googled "British news networks" and search-replaced the BBC into this laughable, lovable brick of a novel.) In between Vittoria being a sexy Mediterranean and the Hassassin being a Big Bad Brown Man we have this dreadful hokey plot with more holes than, ironically, Swiss cheese - considering that one of the most prominent Swiss characters' surnames is "Olivetti" and our hero survives a fall from three miles up with nothing but a small tarp as a parachute, and real-life CERN is graciously putting up with this total crusade of slander and misinformation involving the shape of pillars, their teaching facilities, and the purpose of the Large Hadron Collider. Look, people were irrationally mad enough about the LHC without Dan Brown pulling out his copy of National Geographic and fanning the flames. Robert and Vittoria go on this bullshit quest across Rome to locate the Church of Illumination, for some reason, which leads to all sorts of insane conspiracy claims and both of them jumping to the most ridiculous conclusions in order to find the path that ultimately leads to a painfully obvious location that, after years of preservation, study and reconstruction, someone should have already found inside the Castel Sant'Angelo. They then kill a person, and nobody follows up on this - doesn't the person who found the Hassassin's body lying crumpled on a pile of cannonballs think there's maybe something fishy going on? - and there's a huge twist at the end that is so utterly ridiculous and predictable that it brings up the taste of yesterday's lunch. Where exactly does Dan Brown get off creating books like this one? Books with no integrity, no soul, and no finesse? There is nothing good about this book, and yet it's constructed in such a way that it's virtually impossible to abandon. The constant cliffhangers give this extremely convoluted and silly novel a crack-like quality that is unmatched by any other. I've read some seriously addictive books, but this one takes the fucking cake. I'm not sure why I bothered sticking with this book until the bitter end. It amused me, I suppose. That's probably why. By the final few chapters, I was literally shouting at the book. I kept thinking, "this needs to end. This fucking book needs to be gone from my life." And yet...I continued to read? Like a madwoman? Well, then. A book marketed and constructed with that much psychological witchery deserves a pat on the back. Never have I ever been so sucked in by something so filled with pompous, pretentious, mansplained crap. That's right, actually; this book should have just been called 'Mansplaining'. Because that's basically what it is. Jesus fucking Christ. I have a warm place in my heart for books about special snowflake Americans arriving on their white horses to rescue the rest of the world from themselves. I find them cute. They're certainly entertaining, like a preteen diary, and this one in particular; Brown wants so desperately to be Langdon that it hurts. But where's the harm in all that? Sure, this book is filled with racism and sexism and ethnic stereotyping and pretentious philosophical twaddle but it's not starting any wars. It's no worse than anything on television or anything written for a YA audience of late. I let myself get lost in it for an hour or two, and that was kinda nice. And for all the book's faults, it inspired an absolutely awesome movie. Seriously - the movie was excellent and they cut almost all of the bullshit tumors out for the screenplay which made for two hours of pretty painless entertainment. No mean feat considering the source material. I guess how much you'll enjoy this book depends on how many cheesy yoga jokes you're willing to put up with. Let that be a lesson to you all: when in doubt, or when licking lightbulbs seems like a worthier pastime, leave it out.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Will Byrnes

    Robert Langdon is the protagonist. This is the first novel in which the character appears (The DaVinci Code being the most famous) The well-known symbologist is called in by the director of CERN when a renowned scientist is found murdered. The scientist had created anti-matter, in an attempt to demonstrate that divine creation of the universe was scientifically explainable. The scientist has, of course, a brilliant and beautiful daughter. The tale has much payload regarding the Illuminati, an an Robert Langdon is the protagonist. This is the first novel in which the character appears (The DaVinci Code being the most famous) The well-known symbologist is called in by the director of CERN when a renowned scientist is found murdered. The scientist had created anti-matter, in an attempt to demonstrate that divine creation of the universe was scientifically explainable. The scientist has, of course, a brilliant and beautiful daughter. The tale has much payload regarding the Illuminati, an ancient group of scientists who had formed a secret society in opposition to the church. It is fast-paced, and a well made example of the action adventure tale. We learn much about the history of the illuminati, a bit about CERN, but the central questions remain ones of faith and science. It was a fun read, one I felt impelled to return to when free moments appeared. A few other DBs for your consideration -----The Lost Symbol -----The Da Vinci Code -----Inferno

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Angels & Demons (Robert Langdon #1), Dan Brown Angels & Demons is a 2000 bestselling mystery-thriller novel written by American author Dan Brown and published by Pocket Books and then by Corgi Books. The novel introduces the character Robert Langdon, who recurs as the protagonist of Brown's subsequent novels. Angels & Demons shares many stylistic literary elements with its sequels, such as conspiracies of secret societies, a single-day time frame, and the Catholic Church. عنوانها: شیا Angels & Demons (Robert Langdon #1), Dan Brown Angels & Demons is a 2000 bestselling mystery-thriller novel written by American author Dan Brown and published by Pocket Books and then by Corgi Books. The novel introduces the character Robert Langdon, who recurs as the protagonist of Brown's subsequent novels. Angels & Demons shares many stylistic literary elements with its sequels, such as conspiracies of secret societies, a single-day time frame, and the Catholic Church. عنوانها: شیاطین و فرشتگان؛ فرشتگان و شیاطین؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ تاریخ نخستین خوان: یکی از روزهای سال 2007 میلادی عنوان: شیاطین و فرشتگان؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ مترجم: نوشین ریشهری؛ تهران، نگارینه، 1385؛ در 488 ص؛ چاپ دوم: تهران، نگارینه، 1395 در در 572 ص، شابک: 9789647533287؛ عنوان: فرشتگان و شیاطین؛ نویسنده: دن براون؛ مترجم: علیرضا صدیقی؛ تهران، نشر گستر، 1389 در در 554 ص، شابک: 9786005883183؛ شخصیت «رابرت لانگدون»، و احساسات افراطی او، در باره ی هنر، سمبل شناسی، رمزها، جوامع مخفی و مناطق خاکستری بین خوبی و بدی، رمان حاضر را شکل داده است، «دن براون» نویسنده ای بسیار باهوش هستند. هشدار و اخطار: اگر کتاب را نخوانده اید و میخواهید بخوانید بهتر است ادامه ی نگاره را نخوانید. خلاصه ای از ماجرا: استاد نمادشناسی دانشگاه هاروارد، با همراهی دانشمندی زیبا و مرموز به نام: «ویتوریا وترا»، در مورد ارتباط قتل یک فیزیکدان در «سرن» با یک گروه باستانی به نام اشراقیون و رابطه ی آنها با واتیکان پژوهش می‌کند؛ که منجر به دفع یک توطئه توسط اشراقیون می‌شود. آنها در نظر دارند تا واتیکان را به هنگام جلسه ی انتخاب پاپ منفجر کنند. آن دو به کشفی نامعقول، کشفی در درون ترسناک دخمه‌ های مهر و موم شده، مقبره‌ های خطرناک، کلیساهای متروک و اسرارآمیزترین سرداب روی زمین، پناهگاه فراموش شده ی اشراقیون دست مییابند. ا. شربیانی

  9. 4 out of 5

    Raya راية

    "إن العلم والدين ليسا في نزاع أو خصام مع بعضهما البعض، ولكن كل ما في الأمر هو أن العلم لا يزال حديثاً جداً لكي يفهم." عندما بدأت بقراءة هذه الرواية قبل 3 سنوات، انبهرت بها جداً. فقد كنت مهووسة وقتها -ولا زلت- بروايات أغاثا كريستي وأسلوبها المُبهر، وعلمت بأن هناك روائياً يسمّى دان براون، صاحب أسلوب مُدهش ومثير وقد انتشرت رواياته في كل العالم انتشار النار في الهشيم. وبالفعل، قمت بقراءة جميع أعماله، وهذه الرواية إحدى أفضل ما كتب. قد يسألني البعض، كيف أعيد قراءة رواية كهذه وقد علمت مسبقاً تفصيلاتها "إن العلم والدين ليسا في نزاع أو خصام مع بعضهما البعض، ولكن كل ما في الأمر هو أن العلم لا يزال حديثاً جداً لكي يفهم." عندما بدأت بقراءة هذه الرواية قبل 3 سنوات، انبهرت بها جداً. فقد كنت مهووسة وقتها -ولا زلت- بروايات أغاثا كريستي وأسلوبها المُبهر، وعلمت بأن هناك روائياً يسمّى دان براون، صاحب أسلوب مُدهش ومثير وقد انتشرت رواياته في كل العالم انتشار النار في الهشيم. وبالفعل، قمت بقراءة جميع أعماله، وهذه الرواية إحدى أفضل ما كتب. قد يسألني البعض، كيف أعيد قراءة رواية كهذه وقد علمت مسبقاً تفصيلاتها المُهمّة. وأجيب أنا: برأيي، يملك دان براون خاصيّة مدهشة بجعلك تشعر بالإثارة والتشويق في كل مرة تعيد بها رواياته، وكنت أودّ السفر إلى الفاتيكان وهذه الرواية كانت أرخص تذكرة سفر توفّرت لدي. قبل أن تبدأ بقراءة هذه الرواية تأكد من وجود هاتفك النقال أو حاسوبك الشخصي المشبوك بالإنترنت لتتمكّن من رؤية كل كنيسة وتمثال وضريح ولوحة وشارع تدور بها أحداث الرواية. ملائكة وشياطين، الرواية الأولى التي يظهر بها روبرت لانغدون، البروفيسور في جامعة هارفرد والمتخصص في دراسة الرموز الدينية. لانغدون الذي أجاد دان براون رسم شخصيته بحيث أصبح القارئ قريباً جداً من هذا الرجل، الذي لوهلة شعرت بأنه حقيقي وبأنه هو الذي كتب هذه الرواية، وبأني أريد أن أحضر محاضراته واقرأ كتبه! وهذه ميّزة أخرى يتمتّع بها براون في قدرته على رسم الشخصيات بدقة وما يختلج بداخلها من تساؤلات، فيشعر القارئ بأنها حقيقية تماماً. رواية تدور فكرتها الرئيسية حول الصراع الأزلي بين الدين والعلم، الدين المتمثّل بالكنيسة التي حاربت غاليليو الذي أعلن عن إيمانه بمركزية الشمس وبأن الأرض تدور حولها. عندما درست في الجامعة مادة عن تاريخ الأدب والفن في العصور الوسطى، تكلّمنا كثيراً عن رفض الكنيسة الحاسم لكل تصريح علمي بكروية الأرض وعدم مركزيتها، والذي اعتبرته تشكيكاً في الدين، لأنه -بنظر الكنيسة- خلق الله الإنسان وجعله يستوطن الأرض التي هي مركز الكون، فكيف بالتالي يأتي عالم كغاليليو أو كوبرنيكوس أو جوردانو برونو، ليعلن للناس بأن الأرض ليست سوا جُرم صغير يسبح في فلك عظيم من ملايين الأجرام وبأن الإنسان ليس سوا كائن صغير في هذا الكون اللامتناهي! وبالتالي حاربتهم الكنيسة، مما اضطر هؤلاء العلماء للتخلّي العلني عن هذه المعتقدات الجديدة، ولكنهم -حسب الأساطير والروايات- اجتمعوا سرّاً وشكلّوا ما يعرف بالطبقة المستنيرة، ليشاركوا أبحاثهم وما توصّلوا إليه بعيداً عن أنظار الكنيسة التي كانت قوة تملك نفوذاً طاغياً. وحتى بعد مرور كل هذه القرون والسنوات، يبقى الصراع قائماً بين العلم والدين، ونستشعره في كل لحظة. تأخذنا الرواية إلى عالم هذه الطبقة وعلمائها وطريق الدرب التنويري الذي يقود إلى مخبأها السري، وألغاز التمثايل والمنحوتات والكنائس التي تدل عليها ورموزها وشاراتها الخفيّة. وإلى المركز الأوروبي للأبحاث النووية (سيرن) وآخر ما توصّل إليه العلم هناك. والمؤامرة المُحاكة ضد الفاتيكان والكنيسة والدين عموماً، وجرائم قتل فظيعة بالجملة، بأسلوب مليء بالإثارة والتشويق، يعصب معه أن تتنبأ بما يمكن أن يحصل بعد ذلك. رحلة شيّقة إلى زمن برنيني مايكل أنجلو وغاليليو، ونظرة بعيدة مليئة بالتساؤلات عن مستقبل الأبحاث النووية والمادة المضادة. أقل ما يقال عنها ساحرة، تستحق خمسة نجوم ذهبية بكل جدارة. ملاحظة: الرواية أجمل من الفيلم بكثير ....

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bookdragon Sean

    Dan Brown writes trash, but sometimes trash can have a certain allure. Sometimes trash sucks you in as you feel forced to reach the bottom of the rubbish pile and see what secrets it may be hiding. And that’s the strongest aspect of his writing, the pull. Say what you want about the crazily outlandish plot that’s built upon a nest of poor research and flat characters. Say what you want about the anti-Catholic undertones and the semi-racist portrayal of the antagonist, there’s no denying the inte Dan Brown writes trash, but sometimes trash can have a certain allure. Sometimes trash sucks you in as you feel forced to reach the bottom of the rubbish pile and see what secrets it may be hiding. And that’s the strongest aspect of his writing, the pull. Say what you want about the crazily outlandish plot that’s built upon a nest of poor research and flat characters. Say what you want about the anti-Catholic undertones and the semi-racist portrayal of the antagonist, there’s no denying the intensity of the writing. This is a real page turner, the kind that keeps you reading until three in the morning and makes you want to skip to the end of the book just to see what’s happening. And it’s so entertaining like all good trash should be. Critically speaking, there is so much wrong with this book but I can’t deny how successful it is at keeping the reader involved. It creates so many ridiculous questions that just need to be answered. I stormed through this book at lightning speed. Looking back though, it is very easy to see the faults. Dan Brown hooks his reader, using mystery and suspense as bait, and it is so very easy to bite on the line. Though as every fish knows, once you’ve been netted life only gets worse. This is a book of very cheap thrills, which can be addictive but will only ever be cheap.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Russell

    This was Brown's book before the infamous "The Da Vinci Code." In many ways, this book was like a rough draft for "The Da Vinci Code", same character Langdon, same other characters, same basic start, same concepts, same bad research passed off as fact, same trick of having nearly every chapter end in cliffhanger, the same in so many ways. Sadly, I think he did a better job the first time around. I recommend you have a computer handy so you look up what Brown is talking about, and that way you can This was Brown's book before the infamous "The Da Vinci Code." In many ways, this book was like a rough draft for "The Da Vinci Code", same character Langdon, same other characters, same basic start, same concepts, same bad research passed off as fact, same trick of having nearly every chapter end in cliffhanger, the same in so many ways. Sadly, I think he did a better job the first time around. I recommend you have a computer handy so you look up what Brown is talking about, and that way you can have a better idea of what it really looks like. Added bonus too, you can have a laugh over how Brown had to forced it into his world to make the plot somewhat cohesive. Look, if you want to write fiction, do so but please own up to it being fiction! Trying to pass off the Ecstasy of St. Theresa as being so pornographic in nature that the Vatican had it exiled to a small church, is, well, wrong as wrong as gets. Brown throws out a number of stunningly stupid statements, like asserting that since Christianity is syncretic, God-eating (the Holy Communion) was taken from the Aztecs. How, Brown never explains, since the practice was established by Christ himself during the Last Supper around 33 A.D. and the Aztecs didn't show up until 1248 A.D. I figure Brown left it open so he could write some sort of time travel book, involving a long lost secret that the Aztecs built their pyramids as sort of a dry run, traveled back in time and were actually behind the pyramids in Egypt. And, of course, were the sect that created the Christ-myth due to a poorly thought out plot. Thanks to the internet, you too can have fun poking holes in the book. See, for example, CERN's site on the book. And if that doesn't do it for you, here's a good site looking into all the errors. A sample from the last site: "While walking around the CERN campus, Langdon notices a marble column incorrectly labeled Ionic. Langdon points the mistake out to Kohler: "That column isn't Ionic. Ionic columns are uniform in width. That one's tapered. It's a Doric -- the Greek counterpart." (26) The problem is that Ionic columns are themselves Greek. The three orders of classical columns, Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian, are all Greek in origin, so it's impossible for the Doric order to the be the Greek counterpart of the Ionic. It's also much easier to distinguish the Doric from the Ionic based on their capitals; Doric columns have plain capitals, while Ionic columns are topped by volutes or scrolls." That irked me when I read that passage, because not only is a poor joke, it doesn't make sense! Let's ignore the bad, the erroneous, and the ugly, and you have decent little thriller zipping around Rome looking at art. Of course, it has to zip along, slow down long enough to think about it, and a host of questions start to swarm up. Like how Langdon has a whole theory on who the bad guy is and how Langdon was involved in these rather preposterous circumstances. Of course, the premise is wrong, so that that whole house of cards fall down. Not bad in of itself, but then Brown doesn't ever provide any reason Langdon was involved after that. Of course, you aren't supposed to notice while reading it, and preferably not afterwards, either. Doing so reveals how badly Brown writes. He can't provide a single decent reason why his hero is there, aside from a vague "Because" and a shrug. I'm envious of Brown, he can't write well, has plot holes big enough to drive the Popemobile through, bad research and "facts" that aren't, and yet still is entertaining, popular and, most galling perhaps, published. Caveat lector.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rosey

    Religion always was, is, has been, and always will be a very sensitive subject for me. However this book was a "battle" of religion and science. The storyline was engaging. I have to admit that the beginning was a bit slow, but as the book progressed, the pace really picked up to a point I pruned myself out in the bathtub finishing it. There was a page I found to be very thought-provoking. "Religion is like language or dress. We gravitate toward the practices with which we were raised. In the end Religion always was, is, has been, and always will be a very sensitive subject for me. However this book was a "battle" of religion and science. The storyline was engaging. I have to admit that the beginning was a bit slow, but as the book progressed, the pace really picked up to a point I pruned myself out in the bathtub finishing it. There was a page I found to be very thought-provoking. "Religion is like language or dress. We gravitate toward the practices with which we were raised. In the end, though, we are all proclaiming the same thing." Langdon was intrigued. "So you're saying that whether you are a Christian or a Muslin simply depends on where you were born?" "Isn't it obvious? Look at the diffusion of religion around the globe." "So faith is random?" "Hardly. Faith is universal. Our specific methods for understanding it are arbitrary. Some of us pray to Jesus, some of us go to Mecca, some of us study subatomic particles. In the end, we all are just searching for truth, that which is greater for ourselves." - page 110 This does explain a lot of things for me... *pondering*

  13. 5 out of 5

    James

    Review 4+ out of 5 stars to Dan Brown's Angels & Demons, the first book in his "Robert Langdon" thriller series. When I saw the movie trailer for The Da Vinci Code, I was hooked and immediately bought the book so I could read it first. When I got home, I realized it was not the first in the series... I refused to read it... and then I went to the store and got the first one, Angels & Demons, so I could read them in order. And while it's not really necessary, I always follow the order ( Review 4+ out of 5 stars to Dan Brown's Angels & Demons, the first book in his "Robert Langdon" thriller series. When I saw the movie trailer for The Da Vinci Code, I was hooked and immediately bought the book so I could read it first. When I got home, I realized it was not the first in the series... I refused to read it... and then I went to the store and got the first one, Angels & Demons, so I could read them in order. And while it's not really necessary, I always follow the order (unless I have an ARC with a due date on a newer book and no time to get to the whole series). So I started Angels & Demons, and I was was simply blown away. Not everyone loves Dan Brown, and people aren't always kind, but man... I LOVE HIS BOOKS! And I'm not afraid to say it... so if you don't like them... don't be hating on this review because I will On a more serious note, the climax with each of the murders, the deep connections to so many Catholic rituals and ceremonies, the brilliance of the chase... it just left me unable to stop reading it. It's exactly the kind of book I like to read: 1. Has some connection to me -- I'm Catholic and knew most of the stuff they were talking about 2. I love reading about murder -- since I won't do it in real life, I have to get my thrills somehow 3. Secrets are the best thing in the world -- I have so many about others, but I never let anyone have one about me 4. Classic battle of good versus evil -- This is my life. Should I be good or bad today? Ugh... Sophie's catch #22... 5. It's non-stop thought-provoking messages and themes -- How much control and time do we really have right now? Oh, that's the spot baby! [image error] And with that said... if you want a real review with details about the story, go find someone else's! Today was all about just being excited to think about the book again. Now that said, I thought Da Vinci Code was a slight bit better, hence the 4 here. Ciao! I've got some branding to do... About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. [polldaddy poll=9729544] [polldaddy poll=9719251]

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    When a physicist/priest is murdered, the word Illuminati branded into his chest, and a quarter-gram of antimatter stolen, it's up to renowned symbologist Robert Langdon to find the goods and the murderer. But can he stop someone from using the antimatter as a weapon, even with hot physicist Vittoria Vetra in tow? After all the hype, I managed to dodge this bullet for over a decade but when my girlfriend caught me in a vulnerable moment between books, I knew the time had come. Overall, it was a fu When a physicist/priest is murdered, the word Illuminati branded into his chest, and a quarter-gram of antimatter stolen, it's up to renowned symbologist Robert Langdon to find the goods and the murderer. But can he stop someone from using the antimatter as a weapon, even with hot physicist Vittoria Vetra in tow? After all the hype, I managed to dodge this bullet for over a decade but when my girlfriend caught me in a vulnerable moment between books, I knew the time had come. Overall, it was a fun read. It reminded me of a high tech Indiana Jones a lot of the time. However, at the end of the day, it was pretty much a by the numbers thriller, complete with forced sexual tension. Like I said, it's pretty Indiana Jones-ish, except instead of an archaeologist who has crazy globe-trotting adventures, Langdon is a symbologist who has crazy globe-trotting adventures. As much as I want to hate on this book, it's a page turner; Short chapters, nearly all of them ending on a cliffhanger. However, even for a thriller of this type, the plot seems a little overly complicated. A centuries old secret society is going to use some stolen antimatter to blow up the Vatican? Wouldn't it be easier to get a surplus nuke from the former Soviet Union? The writing is so cheesy and over-dramatic I can't help but be amused. It's really pulpy but not in the good Raymond Chandler way. More like an early Doc Savage. Seriously, Langdon could have said "I'll be super-amalgamated" and it wouldn't have felt that out of place. It almost feels like Brown was trying to do a Black Dynamite-style commentary/spoof on conspiracy thrillers. One thing I didn't enjoy is that the book suffers from "I did a bit of research so I'm going to cram it all in the dialogue" syndrome. There are infodumps galore and lots of redundant information, mostly about symbology. I'm not going to touch on the things that weren't researched and are erroneous since most movies have equally shitty fact checking. I guess I'll rate it 3 stars. It's not well written or to any degree believable but it's a fun and exciting read, like a pack of Skittles for your brain. Not good but definitely entertaining. Not only that, Dan Brown's milkshake brings all the boys to the yard. Any book that gets so many non-readers reading gets a little slack from me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    Angels and Demons by Dan Brown was one of the best page-turners I have ever read. From the very beginning I couldn’t put it down. I did not know where Dan Brown would take the story next. Following the main character Robert Langdon, a Harvard symbologist on his first great adventure was breathtaking. I wanted to learn more, to know the secrets of the Illuminati and the only way to do it was to let the story naturally unfold as I read. I can usually guess what is going to happen in thrillers, but Angels and Demons by Dan Brown was one of the best page-turners I have ever read. From the very beginning I couldn’t put it down. I did not know where Dan Brown would take the story next. Following the main character Robert Langdon, a Harvard symbologist on his first great adventure was breathtaking. I wanted to learn more, to know the secrets of the Illuminati and the only way to do it was to let the story naturally unfold as I read. I can usually guess what is going to happen in thrillers, but Dan Brown did a wonderful job keeping everything a mystery until absolutely necessary to reveal the secrets. I first read the book on a flight from Seattle to Rome, with a few places in between. Never having read the Da Vinci Code before hand I didn’t have as high of expectations as most people do when going to read Angels and Demons. I have often heard that the Da Vinci Code is much better than Angels and Demons but I disagree. Angels and Demons is Dan Brown at his best. I love how he took historical events, places, art and turned them upside down into a thriller that left me wanting more. Dan Brown not only wrote a good novel but he also brought up the old argument of Science vs. Religion. Both sides of the argument are thoughtfully brought up in Angels and Demons and in the end it is up to the reader to decide which side they believe is the right path for them. I love that he didn’t try and persuade the reader of his view on the subject but instead put the evidence and arguments out there for us to make up our own minds. Having traveled to Rome and seeing the places talked about in the novel Dan Brown did a wonderful job putting the readers in the places talked about. As I walked the path of Robert Langdon it seemed even more real to me that events as radical as the illuminati pulled off in the book could have actually happened, giving more power to the fast paced adventure.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Wendi

    So I honestly want to give the book three stars. What I enjoy about Brown is how he can write almost 600 pages of a book and I get almost to the end and realize that it has taken place all in the space of one day. As a writer, I would love to be able to do that. The weaving of religious and scientific themes into an adventure set in European locales is also right up my alley. What I don't like... and why I am forced to drop down to two stars (just a few examples): That same time stretching often So I honestly want to give the book three stars. What I enjoy about Brown is how he can write almost 600 pages of a book and I get almost to the end and realize that it has taken place all in the space of one day. As a writer, I would love to be able to do that. The weaving of religious and scientific themes into an adventure set in European locales is also right up my alley. What I don't like... and why I am forced to drop down to two stars (just a few examples): That same time stretching often results in a parceling of time that is terribly irritating - most of the book actually isn't just in less than one day but in about four to five hours. Unfortunately, in one part of the book, given twenty minutes, the protagonists can, say, drink tea and eat scones, talk at length about their theories about what's happening, run from one location to another, save someone, and research an important historical fact. But during another twenty minutes, they don't seem to have enough time to, say, run the length of a block and enter a building. It must be difficult as an author to keep track of this sort of incongruity but this is Brown's special trick and it's irritating that he can't follow his own rules. It needs to be either one way or the other but not both. Every few chapters, he seems to feel the need to reintroduce his main protagonist by first and last name, "Robert Langdon stood in front of the church..."; like we haven't met this character yet for every single paragraph for the last 126 chapters (and no, I'm not exaggerating on the numbers of chapters). This really, really frustrating thing where the protagonist, Langdon, is this brainy professor that can supposedly figure out these relatively obscure, secret messages hidden by other brainy men hundreds of years ago in order to save the world... and yet he can't figure out the REALLY obvious things right in front of his face. I was listening to this on audiobook and I SWEAR, I kept expecting a three year old child to pipe up from somewhere in the back of the crowd, saying, "Oh, come on, mister! You can't see that? Seriously? Aren't you supposed to be the hero? Even I can see that!! And, finally, lines like, "The silence that followed might as well have been thunder." Um, what... honestly, what? Is this Brown's version of "A thunderous silence followed..."? It's really rather frustrating because I honestly think that in many ways Brown is rather talented; in some of his plotting, the details, the ideas he pulls together. I just wish that in other ways - the writing, some characterization, he could catch up with his other abilities. After reading The Da Vinci Code, I was going to read both this and Digital Fortress but I do believe I will stop here... wishing I could tip it over to the three stars.

  17. 5 out of 5

    مشاري العبيد

    أفضل ما كتب دان براون من وجهة نظري الشخصية .. تجربة سينمائية فريدة على الورق .. و تفوق إثارة كلماتها مشاهدَ الفيلم الذي تم انتاجه في 2009 .. يُرجى ربط الأحزمة فور قراءتك الصفحة الأولى منها .. و تمتع بـ رحلة "تاريخية - مليئة بـ الرموز"..

  18. 4 out of 5

    Luffy

    This is an excerpt from my review of Inferno, which I read before Angels and Demons - With this glowing rating for Inferno, I seal my place among the cheap thrill seeking, easy going, instant gratification demanding readers. I welcome that the other Robert Langdon books follow the same tired schema. Now then, it felt to me that most of the book was not living to this sugary craving of pulp literature. This brought me back to earth, when I was once airborne. However the book picked up for a fiery This is an excerpt from my review of Inferno, which I read before Angels and Demons - With this glowing rating for Inferno, I seal my place among the cheap thrill seeking, easy going, instant gratification demanding readers. I welcome that the other Robert Langdon books follow the same tired schema. Now then, it felt to me that most of the book was not living to this sugary craving of pulp literature. This brought me back to earth, when I was once airborne. However the book picked up for a fiery, flowery third act. By the end I was sweating bullets. But the book is one of the best big books to sustain the ideas and keep providing mini theatricals. It's a wonder how the writer could assimilate all these research and documentation and merge it in a thriller of a bestseller. For that alone I applaud Dan Brown.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ninoska Goris

    Esta historia es cronológicamente anterior a la de El código Da Vinci. Todo comienza cuando convocan a Robert Landon para decifrar algunos códigos dejados en el cuerpo de un científico muerto. Esto ligará a la iglesia contra la ciencia en una legendaria historia de odio. Y el origen de todo es totalmente inimaginable. La película no es tan buena adaptación como la anterior y se pierde totalmente el motivo del origen de toda la historia.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I actually prefered Angels and Demons over The DaVinci Code.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Hertzan Chimera

    Angels and Demons is one of the most insidiously-constructed page turners I’ve ever read and unlike other such efforts (Richard Laymon’s IN THE DARK) I actually raced to the end of it rather than throwing the thing half-finished against the wardrobe in rage. Think of Hercules Poirrot. Think of Inspector Morse. Think of Agatha Christie. Once you strip all the character and soul from these genre writers you have Dan Brown. They all have in common the one writer trick, etirwer (the backwards rewrit Angels and Demons is one of the most insidiously-constructed page turners I’ve ever read and unlike other such efforts (Richard Laymon’s IN THE DARK) I actually raced to the end of it rather than throwing the thing half-finished against the wardrobe in rage. Think of Hercules Poirrot. Think of Inspector Morse. Think of Agatha Christie. Once you strip all the character and soul from these genre writers you have Dan Brown. They all have in common the one writer trick, etirwer (the backwards rewrite). I don’t mean check a book for spelling and grammar. I mean write a basic plot line. Then go back. Adding in detail that will drive the narrative relentlessly towards what you sketched. Stuffing the book with glimpses of false trails and dead ends to keep the reader in the dark, so to speak. Confounding the reader in a way that will make him feel insignificant and meaningless. This, for me, is the worst of all genre writing tricks. Professor of Symbology Robert Langdon in his tweed and nuclear physicist Vittaria Vetra in her Lara Croft gear go in search of the thieves who killed Vittaria’s dad and stole the anti-matter from CERN and find themselves in what appears to be a travelogue of the more obscure bits of Vatican City. It reads just like that, a Treasure Hunt type of book. The reader is dragged along with teasing glimpses of THE TRUTH behind the religion and the war with science that has waged through the ages. But it could have all taken place in a virtual world like the internet or a library with mischievous librarians swapping cards around so old ladies can no longer find their Mills and Boons. Any good book should involve, include, confront or enrage the reader – this book cored out the reader’s personality so that by the end you didn’t care if there were 30 more pages yet to go as the final threads of the convoluted narrative finally unravelled. This book (maybe all Dan Brown books) should come with a mental health warning: At no point in the reading of this book was the reader in danger of thinking. An ultimately vacuous exercise in Franchise Management D.B. even sneaked in an early reference to the following Professor Langdon mystery The DaVinci Code. Enough already!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed H. Mansour

    That was one of the best novels I`ve ever read Here is one of the most few fact I believe in... There`s a very tiny thin hair between every thing and it`s opposite...good & evil...dark & light...matter & antimatter.. Now...dose the scinetist have the right to creat whatever the hell he wanna creat just because he found out that he really CAN creat it?...YES...but how many leiutis that have been created along the way since the very beginning of the human history and was used the our own That was one of the best novels I`ve ever read Here is one of the most few fact I believe in... There`s a very tiny thin hair between every thing and it`s opposite...good & evil...dark & light...matter & antimatter.. Now...dose the scinetist have the right to creat whatever the hell he wanna creat just because he found out that he really CAN creat it?...YES...but how many leiutis that have been created along the way since the very beginning of the human history and was used the our own destruction?... Another fact we need to face...This is a cruel world we live in...And the human is a bloody cruel creature... The truth is...We need religion...Some control...Something to make us stop and think for a moment...To ask ourselves...Am I doing the right thing?...What I`m about to creat...Is it really gonna help the people?...Or it`s simply gonna make life a litte more harder?...As if it wasn`t hard enough already :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    This was an interesting read that makes you ask yourself so many questions. I am not one to comment on religion or anything so no worries, there will be no rants! I have not seen the movie based on this book yet but seen it is free on demand so will probably check it out tonight or tomorrow. I will continue the series, but I believe I have read a couple of these books already awhile back but now want to read in order.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shayantani Das

    We have a term called ‘paisa vasool’ in Hindi. It means ‘worth the money’ and is generally used in reference to films. A mainstream Bollywood film is termed paisa vasool and is commercially successful only when it constitutes the following factors: 1) A hero who can do anything and everything under the sun. He can achieve impossible feats and always survives bizarre accidents. 2) A heroine comes across as smart independent women in beginning but turns into a cardboard cutout by the end. Just anoth We have a term called ‘paisa vasool’ in Hindi. It means ‘worth the money’ and is generally used in reference to films. A mainstream Bollywood film is termed paisa vasool and is commercially successful only when it constitutes the following factors: 1) A hero who can do anything and everything under the sun. He can achieve impossible feats and always survives bizarre accidents. 2) A heroine comes across as smart independent women in beginning but turns into a cardboard cutout by the end. Just another pretty face, another damsel in distress. 3) A plot which is always over the top. Includes dramatic twists, graphic deaths, a little romance thrown here and there, and a demented villain. In the end the hero saves the day and then shares some steamy/mushy moments with the heroine. Halfway through Angels and Demons, I realized that except for the trademark bollywood songs, this book shared every other characteristic of a typical masala film. Logic and reason have only cameo roles, all the characters are one dimensional, there are unexpected twists and turns all along, the prose can be described as pedestrian at best, but somehow you feel compelled to finish the book. To be honest though, my compulsion arose more from the fact that I had bought the book (damn these book sales) than from anything the novel had to offer. That Dan Brown got half of the facts wrong does not please me either. Still, I would give this page turner 2.5 stars, because at the end of the day it was “paisa vasool” and entertaining.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    In the first, I don't know, 30 pages or so a character is "overwhelmed" by the smell of frozen urine. Frozen things don't smell, let alone overwhelmingly. Shortly thereafter an expert in religion (or whatever he is, I've tried to block it out) is shocked to see a study containing both scientific and religious items. I should have put the book down then, but then I would have missed unbelievable characters, hackneyed descriptions and spitting in the face of the laws of physics and physiology. Use In the first, I don't know, 30 pages or so a character is "overwhelmed" by the smell of frozen urine. Frozen things don't smell, let alone overwhelmingly. Shortly thereafter an expert in religion (or whatever he is, I've tried to block it out) is shocked to see a study containing both scientific and religious items. I should have put the book down then, but then I would have missed unbelievable characters, hackneyed descriptions and spitting in the face of the laws of physics and physiology. Use the book to balance your wobbly kitchen table and read the back of your cereal box instead.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mario

    Science tells me God must exist. My mind tells me I will never understand God. And my heart tells me I am not meant to. The first time I read Angels and Demons was 4 years ago, and it completely blew me away. This was my fourth time reading it, and it still is one of my favorite books of all time, and I'm sure it will always remain on that position. In this review, I won't go into the plot, since I think that everyone has either read it, seen the movie, or just heard of what it's about. I will st Science tells me God must exist. My mind tells me I will never understand God. And my heart tells me I am not meant to. The first time I read Angels and Demons was 4 years ago, and it completely blew me away. This was my fourth time reading it, and it still is one of my favorite books of all time, and I'm sure it will always remain on that position. In this review, I won't go into the plot, since I think that everyone has either read it, seen the movie, or just heard of what it's about. I will stick to my feelings about this book, and why it has impacted my life this much. Firstly, the character of Robert Langdon will always be (at least in my opinion) one of the best characters ever created. And Brown's writing style goes perfectly with his character. He is a kind of a professor I would give anything to at least attend one of his lectures. I like his way of thinking, and he knows how to perfectly describe a place or a building, so that you would love to visit and explore every single one of them. And when it comes to the book as a whole, it impacted my beliefs quite a bit. I remember when I first read it, and how it changed my viewpoints on religion, science, Church, and even God as well. Not necessarily in a good or a bad way, it just opened my mind, and ever since then I have tried to not have a closed mind when it comes to both religion and science. They are not the opposite things, and just like Brown said in this book: 'Science and religion are not at odds. Science is simply too young to understand.' And to conclude, I get who so many people dislike or even hate Dan Brown's books, but he was one of those writers who got me into reading. Until now, not a single one of his books disappointed me (and I've read every single one of them) and I'm pretty sure none of them, yet to be written, will.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gerasimos

    When The Da Vinci Code phenomenon happened, I read most of Brown's novels and I enjoyed all of them. But for some reason I didn't read this one, his first one with his famous hero Robert Langdon. And now I really wonder why... because I loved it! Dan Brown combines action with mystery, historical and science elements in an outstanding way and he creates an action thriller that you just cannot put down. One of the greatest aspects of his books are the historical elements. There are times that it f When The Da Vinci Code phenomenon happened, I read most of Brown's novels and I enjoyed all of them. But for some reason I didn't read this one, his first one with his famous hero Robert Langdon. And now I really wonder why... because I loved it! Dan Brown combines action with mystery, historical and science elements in an outstanding way and he creates an action thriller that you just cannot put down. One of the greatest aspects of his books are the historical elements. There are times that it feels like you're watching a documentary, but an exciting one at that! Sometimes it feels like all those information are too much, it even feels like Dan Brown wants to impress the reader with his knowledge, but after you are done with the book you will still find yourself wanting to learn more about them. Another great element that really is one of the reasons that I like his books so much is the setting. Brown always uses a gorgeous place as the background of his story. Τhis time the setting is Rome, one of my favorite cities in the world. The descriptions of the city and the places are breathtaking. Mesmerizing. You feel like you are there. And what I also like is that he uses places in Rome that most tourists don't know about. He presents a hidden side of the city. Places that when you read the book you will want to visit. The whole story takes place in 12 hours and this really is a great idea that Brown fully takes advantage of. You can feel the pressure of the time. I found myself many times throughout the book wanting to scream at the characters to hurry up! This energy that radiates from the pages is what made me read this book in two days. You feel like you are there with the characters, you want to solve the mystery. What I don't like sometimes about Brown's books is that he rushes the ending too much without giving a full explanation to all of my questions (Dear "The Lost Symbol", I am talking about you). But this is not the case with this book. The ending is as amazing as the rest of the story. There are three huge twists at the last fifty pages that really took me by surprise! After that three twists everything is positioned into place perfectly. You rarely find such enjoyable, action-packed thrillers and this is why his books are so popular! They are nothing more than what a popcorn-blockbuster is for the cinema but we all need a book like that sometimes!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Romp I read The Da Vinci Code and then Angels and Demons one after the other or was it the same one twice. Hmmm not sure! The Da Vinci Code was a fast-paced thriller that was a rollicking good read and became a huge success and a movie. Angels and Demons was a fast-paced thriller that was a rollicking good read and became a huge success and a movie. Well, one had Robert Langdon and an attractive female collaborator whose father was just murdered with something branded on his chest and the other Romp I read The Da Vinci Code and then Angels and Demons one after the other or was it the same one twice. Hmmm not sure! The Da Vinci Code was a fast-paced thriller that was a rollicking good read and became a huge success and a movie. Angels and Demons was a fast-paced thriller that was a rollicking good read and became a huge success and a movie. Well, one had Robert Langdon and an attractive female collaborator whose father was just murdered with something branded on his chest and the other had Robert Langdon and an attractive female collaborator whose grandfather was just murdered with something drawn on his chest. Hi, I just spotted the differences. The similarities continue with the style, pace, atmosphere, symbolism, Catholic Church, clues to solve puzzles, and a race against time. I would advise leaving a bit of time between reading the 2 books. The book is an easy read thriller, written as if for a young adult audience. The stories make good films because the plots and storylines are captivating and feed our appetite for conspiracy theories and age-old vendettas stretching back over millennia. I can understand how some people love it and some hate it. For once I much prefer the films!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    As soon as I finished Angels & Demons, I started feeling guilty--and a bit two-faced. You see, I've been telling anyone who would listen (my poor husband, mainly), about Dan Brown's atrocious writing style. Nearly every page was riddled with exaggerated descriptions, cartoon-like characterizations, implausibilities (even for a thriller), and just plain clumsiness. But I am forced to admit that I turned those pages pretty rapidly--maybe a hundred a day near the end. After all, I had to find o As soon as I finished Angels & Demons, I started feeling guilty--and a bit two-faced. You see, I've been telling anyone who would listen (my poor husband, mainly), about Dan Brown's atrocious writing style. Nearly every page was riddled with exaggerated descriptions, cartoon-like characterizations, implausibilities (even for a thriller), and just plain clumsiness. But I am forced to admit that I turned those pages pretty rapidly--maybe a hundred a day near the end. After all, I had to find out if Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon and CERN physicist Vittoria Vetra would find the stolen antimatter hidden deep within the Vatican walls by the defunct-but-seemingly-resurrected religion-hating, science-loving, Freemason-infiltrating Illuminati cult. Was I going to let Mr. Brown's frequent references to his characters "looking" mad, angry, confused, impressed, stupified, insulted, etc. keep me from learning more about an organization to which George H.W. Bush, Galileo, and Cecil Rhodes were supposedly linked? Not on your life. And this does much to explain why Mr. Brown has earned so much money from his novels that he can afford to bail out a hapless financial institution or two. He can tell a story. Angels & Demons is stitched together with just enough historical and scientific facts to get me to buy its shaky premise and continue reading. (Of course, maybe--probably--I'm just gullible). I am not a theologian, a physicist, an art historian, nor a Harvard "symbologist"--but I kinda like learning about that stuff without having to do any heavy lifting by cracking open a Bible or a physics book. Mr. Brown's strange brew of all these disciplines, plus his masterful juggling of characters, plot threads, and time constraints managed to pique my interest. I admit that I was dying to know if Langdon's extensive knowledge of Italian baroque sculpture would save the day and prevent further bloodshed in Rome. A & D is a good summer beach read (though it's a rainy Chicago spring). It will redeem itself if I follow through on my vow to become reacquainted with Galileo's travails and to learn more about Bernini, antimatter, and the Freemasons--all through the magic of Wikipedia.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    I enjoyed "The Da Vinci Code" as a trashy good time, but then read this one and just couldn't stop rolling my eyes. Not only was it silly and formulaic, it made the silly formula underlying "The Da Vinci Code" all too clear. Really? Another middle-aged yet strangely attractive/brilliant male protagonist -- oh wait, the same one from the other book? Another grisly murder of an old dude kicking things off? Another hot foreign chick, related to the dead dude, helping solve the mystery? Another secr I enjoyed "The Da Vinci Code" as a trashy good time, but then read this one and just couldn't stop rolling my eyes. Not only was it silly and formulaic, it made the silly formula underlying "The Da Vinci Code" all too clear. Really? Another middle-aged yet strangely attractive/brilliant male protagonist -- oh wait, the same one from the other book? Another grisly murder of an old dude kicking things off? Another hot foreign chick, related to the dead dude, helping solve the mystery? Another secret society intertwined with the Vatican? Really? Really? I can enjoy a trashy book, sure, but not when you're rubbing my nose in the stink...

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