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The Mediterranean Caper PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: The Mediterranean Caper
Author: Clive Cussler
Publisher: Published April 6th 2004 by G.P. Putnam's Sons (first published January 1973)
ISBN: 9780425197394
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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Dirk Pitt rides a tidal wave of intrigue in this classic Cussler.  On an isolated Greek island, a World War I fighter plane attacks a modern U.S. Air Force base--a mysterious saboteur preys on an American scientific expedition--and Dirk Pitt plays a deadly game of hunter and hunted with the elusive head of an international smuggling ring.  

30 review for The Mediterranean Caper

  1. 5 out of 5

    Edward Lorn

    Fuck this book with a spiked baseball bat soaked in concentrated lime juice. Our hero Dirk Pitt slaps a crying woman because she's still sad over the death of her husband. He then proceeds to tell this thirty-year-old woman that someone should have bent her over their knee and spanked the grief out of her long ago. And then they have sex. To recap the order of events: Slaps her. Says she deserves to be treated like a child. Fucks her. All this within six minutes of meeting this woman. 34 pages in an Fuck this book with a spiked baseball bat soaked in concentrated lime juice. Our hero Dirk Pitt slaps a crying woman because she's still sad over the death of her husband. He then proceeds to tell this thirty-year-old woman that someone should have bent her over their knee and spanked the grief out of her long ago. And then they have sex. To recap the order of events: Slaps her. Says she deserves to be treated like a child. Fucks her. All this within six minutes of meeting this woman. 34 pages in and I'm done with this bullshit. I understand this used to be par for the course, that this was just how men acted, but fuck that nonsense. I'm not reading anymore of this antiquated male fantasy. In summation: I would rather bathe in roadkill and swim in shark infested water than read another page of this book. No matter how hard I try, I cannot get behind a hero who thinks it's okay to lay his hands on a woman in anger, and especially not one who does so in an attempt to stop her from crying over a dead loved one. Final Judgment: Toilet paper.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    This was my first foray into this adventure kind of novel. At least I think that's what it was. It was ok, but pretty mindless entertainment. I feel like I just ate an entire bag of chips or something completely empty of nutritional value. It had its exciting, action-filled moments, but the characters... I had some problems with their lack of depth and the outright sexism really bothered me. I suppose I've been lucky not to read anything before that this blatantly objectifies females, and even m This was my first foray into this adventure kind of novel. At least I think that's what it was. It was ok, but pretty mindless entertainment. I feel like I just ate an entire bag of chips or something completely empty of nutritional value. It had its exciting, action-filled moments, but the characters... I had some problems with their lack of depth and the outright sexism really bothered me. I suppose I've been lucky not to read anything before that this blatantly objectifies females, and even more lucky not to be part of a generation that found this kind of attitude normal. I had read reviews that mentioned this and thought I was prepared. I wasn't. I was completely shocked when Pitt slapped a girl in the face right after meeting her, and then seduced her, and then she thanked him for it. His attitude towards women in general was more chauvinist than anything I've read, maybe ever. It was written in the 1970s, so I can at least hope later books are not as bad. I also was disappointed in the mystery aspect, since it didn't take much for me to figure out what was going on (at least the main part), but then a bunch of extra details were thrown in at the end that came out of nowhere. I was kind of annoyed at the end when Pitt took pages and pages to explain everything he had figured out in a villain reveal-all that reminded me of Scooby Doo. One reason I like mysteries is having the chance to put things together myself, but here I just had to sit back and be told the answers. Except for the really obvious ones that I spotted ages before the main character seemed to catch on. Here, the main point seemed to be the action, and the mystery was just a prop. Still, I'm not really sure what to expect from this type of book, so I might try one of the later Pitt novels before I write the series off - if I can get past the whole attitude towards women. The adventure part at least I can see growing on me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    César Lasso

    Un librito de aventuras que se ha dejado leer, pero no me ha entusiasmado. El héroe de la novela, el mayor Dirk Pitt, resulta plano, unidimensional: un macho de otros tiempos que lo tiene fácil para seducir a las heroínas y que sale triunfante de sus difíciles peripecias. De los libros de Clive Cussler que he leído, me resultaron más entretenidas otras dos lecturas: Sahara y Muerte blanca. Peligro en el Mediterráneo fue uno de los primeros de la serie de Dirk Pitt, que se puede leer de forma inde Un librito de aventuras que se ha dejado leer, pero no me ha entusiasmado. El héroe de la novela, el mayor Dirk Pitt, resulta plano, unidimensional: un macho de otros tiempos que lo tiene fácil para seducir a las heroínas y que sale triunfante de sus difíciles peripecias. De los libros de Clive Cussler que he leído, me resultaron más entretenidas otras dos lecturas: Sahara y Muerte blanca. Peligro en el Mediterráneo fue uno de los primeros de la serie de Dirk Pitt, que se puede leer de forma independiente del orden cronológico. Compruebo en Goodreads que fue publicado por primera vez en 1973. Me ha hecho gracia ver que apenas han pasado cuatro décadas y media de su publicación, y ya se ve una eternidad de distancia con el momento actual: los personajes fuman en cualquier lugar (hoy está prohibido en la mayoría de los sitios) y abundan los clichés y estereotipos que hoy se inhibirían ante lo políticamente correcto: que si los alemanes son cuellicortos, que si las mujeres son así y asá…

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    A flashy, invigorating and imaginative thriller, The Mediterranean Caper is an incredible, vivid story with great characters and a totally unique plot.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    A cover blurb on another Dirk Pitt novel compares the hero of Clive Cussler's novels to James Bond. The comparison is an apt one, especially when it comes to the first two novels in the series The The Mediterranean Caper Dirk Pitt 2 and Iceberg Dirk Pitt 3. In the same way that Fleming used Bond as a way to comment on the ways in which masculinity could and should be defined, Cussler defines what is masculine through the opinions, actions and attitudes of one Dirk Pitt. For example, in Caper, Pit A cover blurb on another Dirk Pitt novel compares the hero of Clive Cussler's novels to James Bond. The comparison is an apt one, especially when it comes to the first two novels in the series The The Mediterranean Caper Dirk Pitt 2 and Iceberg Dirk Pitt 3. In the same way that Fleming used Bond as a way to comment on the ways in which masculinity could and should be defined, Cussler defines what is masculine through the opinions, actions and attitudes of one Dirk Pitt. For example, in Caper, Pitt meets a women who has been mourning the passing of her husband for a number of years and decides the thing she needs to help her get over his death is to find someone new to make love to. Within moments, Pitt and the woman are having a little sex on the beach (not the alcoholic kind mind you) and the woman is soon totally over her depression and grief and now devoted to Pitt. (In many ways, the scene reminds me of the "cure" put forward in Kevin Smith's Chasing Amy. If you've seen it, you'll know what I'm talking about). But the attitude doesn't just extend to women. Pitt is the alpha male of alpha males in the novel, including wandering around naked at one point while being debriefed by his superior officer. Pitt is also one of the few people in the world to ever navigate his way out of a deadly maze trap, all while wounded and losing blood. In many ways, Pitt is Jack Bauer and Chuck Norris of his day and age. He lives hard, loves hard and gets the job done. Like Bond or Bauer, Pitt is generally right about his assumptions, while others higher up in authority are wrong. And he's not afraid to say it or act on his assumptions. These thoughts occurred to at about the mid-point of Caper and they really helped me to not worry so much about the details of the story and just go along for the ride. I doubt any one will mistake this book for fine literature but as a popcorn, escapist thriller, it's kind of a fun ride and it certainly does keep the pages turning. Pitt is called in to investigate an aerial attack on a local airbase from a World War II era plane. Is it a ghost come back or could the timing of the attack be tied into the discovery of a wreck just off the coast? Pitt soon finds himself facing a hiding Nazi war criminal, who just happens to be the uncle to his new female love interest. It's a battle of wits and a race against time for the two. Again, the less you think about the story and just kind of let it wash over you like a big-budget Hollywood thriller, the happier you'll probably be. It's interesting to read the novel thirty plus years after its initial publication and to take note of the multiple references to smoking that litter the novel. Moving forward it will be interesting to see if and how Pitt's (and to the same extent Cussler's)attitude toward the use of tobacco changes. I can't imagine that Pitt would be the smoker in the latest installments that he is here. So turn the brain off and just enjoy. You may be glad you did.

  6. 4 out of 5

    William

    I don't mind some objectionable items but mistreatment of women is one thing I can't abide. Thankfully there was only a small amount of this at the beginning. I am at a loss as to why authors feel that a misogynistic attitude is a must in action books. Dirk Pitt is a dick! This shows in his cavalier and demeaning attitude toward women and in his over the top arrogance. The book was long on action and short on believable plot. Needless to say, Dirk Pitt rises up and saves the day. I am not sure I I don't mind some objectionable items but mistreatment of women is one thing I can't abide. Thankfully there was only a small amount of this at the beginning. I am at a loss as to why authors feel that a misogynistic attitude is a must in action books. Dirk Pitt is a dick! This shows in his cavalier and demeaning attitude toward women and in his over the top arrogance. The book was long on action and short on believable plot. Needless to say, Dirk Pitt rises up and saves the day. I am not sure I will read more of this drivel.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Maxi Bransdale

    I was having a conversation with my dad the other day about the first ‘serious’ book I read. You know, that moment when you graduate from The Famous Five into more adult fiction. I racked my brains and came to the conclusion that it was Mr Cussler that first welcomed me, at the tender age of eleven, into the wonderful, and often mystical, world of adult fiction. So coming back to this book is sentimental for me. I have a lot of fond memories of the Dirk Pitt novels, not in the least because they I was having a conversation with my dad the other day about the first ‘serious’ book I read. You know, that moment when you graduate from The Famous Five into more adult fiction. I racked my brains and came to the conclusion that it was Mr Cussler that first welcomed me, at the tender age of eleven, into the wonderful, and often mystical, world of adult fiction. So coming back to this book is sentimental for me. I have a lot of fond memories of the Dirk Pitt novels, not in the least because they got me through some hairy moments at school. Which is why I just can’t bring myself to be mean. Dirk Pitt was a massive part of my childhood and cultivating my love for books. But even I, through glasses that are rose-tinted, can see how ridiculous this whole book is. Hell, even the characters regularly remark how daft some of the premises are. (view spoiler)[ An ancient, undiscovered fish? Really Mr Cussler, really? To quote “You mean to say that I have fifteen million dollars worth of wrecked aircraft scattered over a base under my personal command, my military career all but ruined, and all because of a goddamned fish?” I rest my case. (hide spoiler)] Of course, it must be remembered that this was written in the days when an appropriate response to an attack on a US Air Base has our intrepid hero quip “Maybe it’s an irate Greek farmer who’s tired of our jets scaring his goats.” And not be in a terrible rush to investigate. It is time locked. You find yourself telling him to just use his mobile phone dammit only to realise this is 1973. It actually hasn’t aged too badly in that sense. Once you get in that mindset, you don’t notice it. And Pitt is a piece of work. I’m actually kind of surprised my parents thought this appropriate reading material for an eleven year old. I grew to love the character as the books went on so it was a nasty surprise coming back to this book. His treatment of Teri at the beginning honestly took my breath away. A writer these days would be lynched for not only having their hero pull such a stunt but then be proud and defiant of it. And even beyond that, the character is rude, abrasive (and not in a James Bond sort of a way despite what the blurb says) and too cocky for his own good. Even his whole ‘garbage guy’ routine sets my bones all wrong. Not to mention his behaviour when he first meets Von Till. (view spoiler)[ Quite frankly, I’d have set the dog on him too. (hide spoiler)] He just makes it very hard for me to like him. I get the whole ‘rough around the edges’ vibe, and its part of what I love about the character in later books, but in this one it is overdone and leaves a bitter taste. It’s strange for me. Like seeing a side of a long-time friend I wish I hadn’t. More so because I love most of the characters in his work. I think I fell in love with Giordino the moment he first turned up on the page. He’s his usual likeable self, and frankly more likeable than his best bud in this particular caper, with some brilliant quips that raise a smile. Gunn, while not one of my favourite characters, serves his purpose and is an engaging presence. Word of warning, feminists should stay clear of this book. There is only one female character of note and, well, let’s just say she does damsel in distress very well. I think mostly it is the age of the book showing because in later books Cussler has written some brilliant female characters (Summer, Loren for starters) but this is very much in that mentality of ‘women are for saving’ (and cooking). ((And generally being sex objects)). (((Yeah, feminists will not like this novel))). My main gripe with this book, however, is its villain. He feels like he stepped out of a comic book. He is so overblown and overworked. He doesn’t quite get as far as monologuing but I hear maniacal laughter whenever he enters a room. It’s frustrating because ironically, it lessens him as a foe for Pitt. The book struggles too with its writing. This reads like exactly what it is, a first attempt (appropriately also the chosen name of the NUMA vessel in this book). This book would never have been published today. Not in the state it is in. The writing is clumsy and overworked very often, pushing too hard for suspense. This is an author that overuses the much-contentious adverbs and his descriptive work is very… blunt. It’s weird for me because I know how good Cussler’s later work is. It’s like reading a story you wrote in high school and thinking ‘Oh God, I let people read this???’ I wonder what he thinks when he reads it back now. It’s also another ‘all hail America’ books. My dear fellow Brits, be prepared to once again be stereotyped. Quote: “By jove, that’s a bit all right”. Dear America, we do not speak like this. Love England. The last third of the book is much better. The pace picks up, Pitt finally learns how to act like a hero, Giordino gets more page time and everything ties together. The conspiracy and main plot is clever and well thought out, if a little far-fetched but it’ll keep you going with a few surprises along the way. Mayday is not a bad book. It is a throwaway book. It is a silly but engaging 240 pages of easy reading. The prose isn’t so bad as to detract from the basic enjoyment of the story. I’m going to be re-working my way through Cussler’s books. On that scale, this is one of his low points, and frankly, I’d say don’t bother with it. Despite being first published, it’s not actually first chronologically and there is nothing in this book that you can’t discover in some of the others. They call Clive Cussler the “Grandmaster of Adventure” and that is what he did become, but this I am afraid, is not his finest hour. Check out more at ... http://www.maxibransdale.com/

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bob O'G

    I am openly admitting that I am violating some rule by reviewing this book because I did not finish it. I read 150 pages of this nonsense before giving up. I purchased it because Clive Cussler is on every bookshelf of every book retailer in the country and I guess I was curious. Here's a few reasons why I could not stand this drivel. This book contains a recurring character in Cussler's work named Dirk Pitt, which is a name so contrived I can't believe a human being let it escape his thought ban I am openly admitting that I am violating some rule by reviewing this book because I did not finish it. I read 150 pages of this nonsense before giving up. I purchased it because Clive Cussler is on every bookshelf of every book retailer in the country and I guess I was curious. Here's a few reasons why I could not stand this drivel. This book contains a recurring character in Cussler's work named Dirk Pitt, which is a name so contrived I can't believe a human being let it escape his thought bank and committed it to paper. The Dirk Pitt description before the novel even starts reads as if 100 cliches of heroes were written on little pieces of paper, thrown into a hat, and then the author picked out 10 at random. He is a cookie cutter protagonist. A cardboard character. A novel about a personified piece of actual cardboard would have been infinitely more interesting. The story itself? Dime novel adventure stuff. (There's nothing wrong with this stuff by the way if its done properly. Raiders of the Lost Ark anyone?) Before I go, I just have to describe a scene from the book which just happens to be the worst scene I've ever read in my 32 years on earth. Dirk Pitt is on a beach and sees a beautiful blonde woman sitting near the surf. He sits next to her. She is crying because her husband is deceased. Dirk slaps her in the face to get her to stop bereaving I suppose. Then she sleeps with him. Turns out, Dirk Pitt is not so much a hero as he is a douche. In a better book, she would have shot him after he slapped her and then the book could be about her.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Roopkumar Balachandran

    NUMA undertakes an expedition in Mediterranean sea in search for a fish which could link to the evolution of mammals and also believed to be an extinct species 200 hundred millions year ago. The expedition was sabotaged, our hero Dirk Pitt is sent to investigate. A World War I biplane attacks the nearby Brady airfield, Pitt cleverly completes the puzzle thrown by his adversary through his wit and dare devilry. A lot of unexpected twist in the story, three characters one is Bruno von Till who is b NUMA undertakes an expedition in Mediterranean sea in search for a fish which could link to the evolution of mammals and also believed to be an extinct species 200 hundred millions year ago. The expedition was sabotaged, our hero Dirk Pitt is sent to investigate. A World War I biplane attacks the nearby Brady airfield, Pitt cleverly completes the puzzle thrown by his adversary through his wit and dare devilry. A lot of unexpected twist in the story, three characters one is Bruno von Till who is believed to be Admiral Heibert, Commander of Nazi Germany's transportation fleet, a fanatical follower of Adolph Hitler, and brother of Kurt Heibert. Second character Bruno von Till's niece a widow Teri and finally Darius the monster. Awesome engineering feats behind the smuggling of heroin through Minerva Lines freighter and the sunken cave of the villain are unexpected revelations for me. Two escapades of Dirk Pitt are worth mentioning and has the edge of the seat thrilling experience, one is escaping from the clutches of Bruno von Till's labyrinth and another from the deserted Queen Artemisia ship. Below two incidents which shows Pitt's cleverness and remained me of watching a MGR movie. One is after getting out of the car, Dirk Pitt with Willie the chauffeur. "Willie my friend, Pitt said seriously, I must tell you something. Will you step out of the car for a moment? Willie's brows wrinkled but he shrugged and stepped from the car, facing Pitt. Now Herr Pitt, what do you wish to tell me? I see you wear jackboots, Willie. Ja, I wear jackboots. Pitt flashed his best used car salesman's smile. And jackboots have hobnails, don't they? Ja, jackboots have hobnails, said Willie irritably. Why do you waste my time with such nonsense? I have duties to perform. What is it you wish to say? Pitt's eyes grew hard. My friend, I felt that if you want to earn your peeping Tom merit badge, it's my duty to warn you that silver rimmed spectacles reflect the sun's rays and can easily give your hiding place away..... and Pitt's fist slammed into his mouth, cutting off the words. Another incident, Pitt with Bruno von Till who had dressed appropriately for the dinner in his house: Pitt's eyes searched von Till. Is that why you carry a Luger in a shoulder holster?" And one liner I like to quote when badly injured Pitt tries to enter First Attempt: "I'm Pitt and I'm injured. Now stop screwing around and hurry. Is it really you, Major? the lookout asked hesitantly. What the Goddamn hell do you want? snapped Pitt, a birth certificate?" Yet another superb thriller from Clive Cussler, I enjoyed reading the book. More of book reviews in www.chromaring.com

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I did not read this entire book. I wanted to like it because I love the concept of Dirk Pitt, but I can't get past his view of women. As early as page 27 of the book, Dirk gets angry because a woman has had the audacity to still be in mourning over a husband that died 9 years previously. For this crime, he slaps her. When she asks him why he hit her, he responds with the following: "Because you needed it, needed it badly," he snapped. "That torch you carry around is as worn out as an overcoat. I I did not read this entire book. I wanted to like it because I love the concept of Dirk Pitt, but I can't get past his view of women. As early as page 27 of the book, Dirk gets angry because a woman has had the audacity to still be in mourning over a husband that died 9 years previously. For this crime, he slaps her. When she asks him why he hit her, he responds with the following: "Because you needed it, needed it badly," he snapped. "That torch you carry around is as worn out as an overcoat. I'm surprised someone hasn't taken you over a knee and spanked it all off. So your husband was dashing. So what? He's dead and buried, and mourning him over him for all these years won't resurrect him from the grave. Lock away his memory somewhere and forget him. You're a beautiful woman--you don't belong chained to a coffin full of bones. You belong to every man who turns and admires you as you pass by and who longs to possess you." After making her cry he then turns her vulnerable moment into an opportunity for sex. I fully understand that Dirk is supposed to be a James Bond-like character for the archaeological world, but that passage was so revolting, I couldn't stomach any more. His speech to her was condescending, lacked any compassion whatsoever, and was just truly and really offensive. But the real jewel in that little speech was his comment that she belongs to every man who admires her and who longs to possess her. That kind of perspective is something I do not agree with--and I'm a far cry from a feminist. That is a character that needs to get over himself. R.I.P. Dirk.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jorgen Schäfer

    Clive Cussler’s The Mediterranean Caper starts out just as Major Dirk Pitt arrives on an island near Greece to investigate a series of mishaps on a science vessel looking for a rare fish. The arrival coincides with the attack of an old World War I war plane attacking an US Air Force air field. Dirk Pitt can drive the old war plane off with his own non-combat plane, but is now drawn into a strange fight seemingly about fish. The second book in the Dirk Pitt series keeps up the story of the James B Clive Cussler’s The Mediterranean Caper starts out just as Major Dirk Pitt arrives on an island near Greece to investigate a series of mishaps on a science vessel looking for a rare fish. The arrival coincides with the attack of an old World War I war plane attacking an US Air Force air field. Dirk Pitt can drive the old war plane off with his own non-combat plane, but is now drawn into a strange fight seemingly about fish. The second book in the Dirk Pitt series keeps up the story of the James Bond like hero and womanizer who lives through the strangest adventures. The amount of repetitions where the author tries to tell the reader how incredibly awesome Dirk Pitt is are vastly reduced in comparison to the first adventure, but there are still lengthy revelation scenes where Pitt explains the whole story to the Evil Overlord, showing him that he totally saw through him. Other than that, the book is a very simple and fast read, good for casual, low-brain reading. If you don’t mind some chauvinism towards women and a rather simple but fast-paced story, you can’t go wrong here. Don’t expect high-quality literature, though.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Leah Murphy

    This was my 2nd Dirk Pitt book (Dragon was my first) that I picked up after realizing that the BF owned enough of the series that I could read it in some semblance of order. Though I know it doesn't make a huge deal of difference with these novels, I still did find it more enjoyable to start at least close to the "beginning". These are a mix of what I like to call my "Guilty Pleasures" and something more substantial, as even though they are easy reads, they have enough accurate and new informatio This was my 2nd Dirk Pitt book (Dragon was my first) that I picked up after realizing that the BF owned enough of the series that I could read it in some semblance of order. Though I know it doesn't make a huge deal of difference with these novels, I still did find it more enjoyable to start at least close to the "beginning". These are a mix of what I like to call my "Guilty Pleasures" and something more substantial, as even though they are easy reads, they have enough accurate and new information that I do actually feel like I am increasing my knowledge base on at least a slight level. They are definitely a predicatable format (one of my favorite Goodreads Reviews summed up: Meet Bad Guy, Meet Dirk, Meet Hot Girl, Enter dangerous situation to defeat bad guy, Dirk Wins, Dirk Gets the Girl - is spot on) but they are still different enough to be enjoyable. Especially on a rainy day in January!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    A lazy Sunday afternoon at a U.S Air Force base on a quiet Greek island is shattered when a WWI-era German fighter attacks and then finds itself in a dogfight with a WWII-era seaplane. The Mediterranean Caper by Clive Cussler was the first published book featuring Dirk Pitt and started off a four decade long series of books that sold millions of books and multiple times on the bestseller list. Dirk Pitt and his best friend Al Giordino, heading to the Greek island of Thasos on a special assignment A lazy Sunday afternoon at a U.S Air Force base on a quiet Greek island is shattered when a WWI-era German fighter attacks and then finds itself in a dogfight with a WWII-era seaplane. The Mediterranean Caper by Clive Cussler was the first published book featuring Dirk Pitt and started off a four decade long series of books that sold millions of books and multiple times on the bestseller list. Dirk Pitt and his best friend Al Giordino, heading to the Greek island of Thasos on a special assignment to a NUMA vessel, fight off a WWI German fighter attacking a nearby U.S. Air Force base in a WWII-era seaplane. The next morning Dirk takes an early morning swim and meets Teri von Till, niece of a reclusive shipping magnate who lives on the island. After meeting with the NUMA vessel’s captain, Pitt goes to meet Teri’s uncle Bruno for dinner and finds out he was a German pilot in World War I with a model submarine in his study. Von Till attempts to kill Pitt with his dog, but Pitt escapes and the next day with Giordino invade von Till’s mansion and kidnap Teri only to be detained by a member of an INTERPOL drug task force. Pitt and Giordino learn that von Till is a suspected drug smuggler and are ordered by the NUMA director to aid INTERPOL in stopping a massive shipment of heroin from reaching the U.S. After boarding the suspected cargo ship with the heroin, Pitt figures out how von Till hasn’t been caught. Pitt then leads a group of scientists to look for and find a massive cave in which they find several submarines, though caught by von Till and a mole from the INTERPOL task force it’s an elaborate trap as Giordino, several INTERPOL agents, and military personnel had raided von Till’s mansion and listened in on Pitt explaining to von Till everything he had figured out including that he was actually a Nazi war criminal which von Till didn’t deny. This is a quick pacing book and has numerous cliché elements that one would expect to find in an early 1970s adventure novel with the main character notably inspired by James Bond. While I could knock the disjointed narrative flow or the weak character development of some of the other characters given the time period it was to be expected, the biggest eyesore is Dirk Pitt himself. The term “jerk” is a cleaned up way to describe Pitt’s interacting with anyone in the book including his best friend, Al, and his way to make a woman interested in him, slapping her for still mourning her late husband. This is not the same Pitt that appears in Pacific Vortex! or later in the series and would be a definite turn off for anyone encountering the character for the first time. The Mediterranean Caper is a quick adventure that is sometimes fun, but today has a lot of problems. Though Clive Cussler’s portrayal of Dirk Pitt has improved over the last four decades, I would not recommend this book for those either interested in reading or listening to a Dirk Pitt novel. If you have read or listened to later books then be warned this is not the same Dirk that you’ve encountered.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jane Stewart

    2 stars. Not for me, but it might be good for teen boys and adults in that kind of mood. STORY BRIEF: A group of scientists are looking for a fish that may exist in the Mediterranean Sea. They thought it was extinct. Someone is sabotaging things. Dirk Pitt is assigned to help them. Some bad guys are nearby doing bad things. REVIEWER’S OPINION: I enjoyed the Lee Child books about Jack Reacher, and I thought this author might be similar. Although I’ve compared Jack to a comic book hero, I find Dirk i 2 ½ stars. Not for me, but it might be good for teen boys and adults in that kind of mood. STORY BRIEF: A group of scientists are looking for a fish that may exist in the Mediterranean Sea. They thought it was extinct. Someone is sabotaging things. Dirk Pitt is assigned to help them. Some bad guys are nearby doing bad things. REVIEWER’S OPINION: I enjoyed the Lee Child books about Jack Reacher, and I thought this author might be similar. Although I’ve compared Jack to a comic book hero, I find Dirk is much more of a comic book hero than Jack. Dirk is a hero adventurer whose life is often in danger, but he always survives and outwits the bad guys. I’ve now read two Dirk Pitt books. I’m done. He just doesn’t do it for me. I’m not sure why. Jack Reacher fascinates and entertains me but Dirk doesn’t. The Dirk stories feel like action-adventure movies, not the kind of depth that I normally get from books. Maybe because the characters and motivations aren’t developed enough for me? I’m not sure. DATA: Story length: 372 pages. Swearing language: moderate, including religious swear words. Sexual language: none. Sex scenes: one brief scene was vaguely referred to, no details. Setting: current day Mediterranean Sea, Island of Thasos, and Washington D.C. Copyright: 1973. Genre: action adventure thriller

  15. 4 out of 5

    Duzzlebrarian

    Don't waste your time reading this one. The plot is fine, typical beach reading, but... There's fine line between machismo and misogynistic kak, and this particular book crosses it. It's the difference between a dog pissing to mark his territory, and a dog pissing on you to mark his territory. I like Cussler's stuff, but if I'd started with this one I would have developed a permanent sour opinion for him. Thank God it dawned on him that women can read too, and changed a few things later in the s Don't waste your time reading this one. The plot is fine, typical beach reading, but... There's fine line between machismo and misogynistic kak, and this particular book crosses it. It's the difference between a dog pissing to mark his territory, and a dog pissing on you to mark his territory. I like Cussler's stuff, but if I'd started with this one I would have developed a permanent sour opinion for him. Thank God it dawned on him that women can read too, and changed a few things later in the series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark Harrison

    Second Dirk Pitt and same old story. Baddie with underwater secret hideaway and a hero who slaps women and thinks that is cool. I am told that the early books lead to a great series. Not convinced yet.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jim Thomsen

    The first six Dirk Pitt books filled some lonely hours for me between the ages of 14 and 16, when I was in a Christian boarding school and bored out of my mind for long stretches at a time. They were fast, fun and forgettable, well-suited to whiling away long nights and eternal weekends. I picked them up again for the first time in nearly 30 years, wondering if they still held up for me. The answer is "no," but is that because my reading tastes have evolved in my mid-forties, or is it because Cl The first six Dirk Pitt books filled some lonely hours for me between the ages of 14 and 16, when I was in a Christian boarding school and bored out of my mind for long stretches at a time. They were fast, fun and forgettable, well-suited to whiling away long nights and eternal weekends. I picked them up again for the first time in nearly 30 years, wondering if they still held up for me. The answer is "no," but is that because my reading tastes have evolved in my mid-forties, or is it because Clive Cussler's books aren't especially good? The answer is probably "both." But, as Roger Ebert says about film criticism, "it is not what it is about, but how it is about it." And so I will judge a book like "The Mediterranean Caper" by one simple criteria: Does it accomplish what it sets out to do? It does. Cussler's books are maritime thrillers, informed by the author's own global exploits on the high seas, and they glide smoothly and speedily along on a solid foundation of marine and military authenticity. The plots are intriguing and the pacing is just right. What's tougher to get past — and maybe this is a function of the early 1970s, when this book was written — is the jingoism and misogyny of Dirk Pitt's behavior and worldview. The military officer and maritime troubleshooter doesn't seem to have much use for women, as much as he purports to love them, and an early scene in the book depicting Pitt slapping, snarling at and then seducing a woman he just met on the beach of a Greek island seems flat-out cringe-inducing in any time or context. Pitt seems impatient with everyone, and the scenes in which he cries "bullshit" in the face of the nominal authorities he encounters strikes me as the sort of speechifying we all wish we could deliver to the people who intimidate us (but never do). Such moments stunt the storytelling by making Pitt seem more like a fantasy caricature than a grounded can-do mortal. Otherwise, the book does its job capably enough, with the exception of a late scene in which Pitt and the archvillian spin through a windy exchange — pages and pages and pages worth — about how and the why about the bad guy's motives and methods that surely must have lasted an hour ... even though the baddie earlier informed Pitt that he would kill him in precisely eleven minutes' time. Tying up a few loose ends is one thing, but droning on and on about plot points that probably should have been covered earlier serves to bring the action to a screeching halt. That is, until the good guys arrive in the nick of time. Even James Bond wouldn't have filibustered his way through the final scene of a movie, let alone one of the ego-blinded archvillians he went up against. (Bruno Von Till, the sneering black hat of "The Mediterranean Caper," seems cut from whole cloth out of a Bond caper.) It was fun to revisit Cussler and Pitt, but I moved on for a reason when I was 16 after the first six books (I think I discovered Stephen King), and think that this one book is all the nostalgia fix I require. In short, "The Mediterranean Caper," like many of the early Pitt books, is fast and light reading, ... light also on character development and intellectual heft. Which, I believe, is all they try to be. If that's your thing, great. If not, there are plenty of better-written, more complex thrillers out there.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Molly Jo

    Clive Cussler books fall into the category I like to call "Brain Candy": completely entertaining and teaches me something completely new. If you've seen the movie Sahara, then you're already familiar with these characters. I LOVE that movie and was happily surprised to realize it was a book in a very extensive series. Dirk Pitt and Al Giardino work for the National Underwater Marine Agency and have been sidekicks since their much younger days. The interplay and banter between the two is entertain Clive Cussler books fall into the category I like to call "Brain Candy": completely entertaining and teaches me something completely new. If you've seen the movie Sahara, then you're already familiar with these characters. I LOVE that movie and was happily surprised to realize it was a book in a very extensive series. Dirk Pitt and Al Giardino work for the National Underwater Marine Agency and have been sidekicks since their much younger days. The interplay and banter between the two is entertaining and captivating. Cussler is the founder of NUMA in real life, so the information provided is accurate and detailed. Growing up on the Gulf Coast, I've always been interested in marine biology and explorations, so I'm extra appreciative of the information given. I'm also the type who soaks up new info like a sponge. The Mediterranean Caper is Cussler's first novel with Dirk and Al. The action starts within the first 3 pages and doesn't stop until the very last. Dirk Pitt books aren't the kind I can read one after the other. I have to be in a certain mood and need a break from angst and/or romance. In that situation, Cussler's action is perfect. This is actually my second Cussler novel to read. The first was Flood Tide, which is right in the middle of the series. I'm starting over from the beginning now! The synopsis up there pretty much sums it up: a plane straight from WWI starts causing all sorts of problems for not only the AFB in Greece, but the NUMA ship anchored offshore looking for an extremely rare fish in the Mediterranean Sea. Dirk and Al save the day when the plane makes it's first attack on the AFB and end up getting in a lot deeper than they planned. There's a beautiful female lead character which adds extra motivation for Dirk. All the elements of a great time!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Barbara ★

    Damn I just love Dirk Pitt! He's not a hottie, heck according to Cussler, he's not even handsome; regardless, he always gets the girl. He's just like MacGiver, from that old TV show. Give him a toothpick and a high heeled shoe and he can get out of any death-defying scrape imaginable. Dirk is quick on his feet and even though he always gets caught, his unconventional tactics will amaze you. This time he and Al Gordino are sent in to Greece to help one of NUMA's research vessels that have been sa Damn I just love Dirk Pitt! He's not a hottie, heck according to Cussler, he's not even handsome; regardless, he always gets the girl. He's just like MacGiver, from that old TV show. Give him a toothpick and a high heeled shoe and he can get out of any death-defying scrape imaginable. Dirk is quick on his feet and even though he always gets caught, his unconventional tactics will amaze you. This time he and Al Gordino are sent in to Greece to help one of NUMA's research vessels that have been sabotaged again and again. Of course, Dirk and Al aren't satisfied just flying to save the day. No no no, Dirk has to get stumble on an ingenious drug smuggling operation and immediately get on the bad side of the culprit. This was written in 1973 so it's not as involved and convoluted as Cussler's later Pitt novels. Even so, I enjoyed the hell out of it as I always do.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mikael Thinsz

    Den här boken vacklar mellan att vara så dålig att det är underhållande och att bara vara medioker. Från det överförälskade sättet författaren gillar att beskriva huvudpersonens manlighet, till att beskriva all typ av militär hårdvara med samma förtjusning och till det rent skrattretande sättet som kvinnor porträtteras så finns det bara en beskrivning som passar in: gubbporr. ...men den var lite intressant i slutet. Otroligt fånig. Men stundtals underhållande. 0/10, Helt okej bok.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sam Hacker

    I'm glad I started with Sahara rather than this one

  22. 4 out of 5

    Isaac

    Read in 2018. Sometimes, the sucess of a book or series is a mistake. The result of clever marketing or even dumb luck. In 2018, it would be easy to point a finger at the formula laden, ghost written book shelf that belongs to Clive Cussler and guess that he might be such an author. But go back to 1973. Go back to this book (or Pacific Vortex, which was written even earlier)... The success of Clive Cussler and Dirk Pitt is not a mistake. Even this book, that most fans admit is one of the weaker on Read in 2018. Sometimes, the sucess of a book or series is a mistake. The result of clever marketing or even dumb luck. In 2018, it would be easy to point a finger at the formula laden, ghost written book shelf that belongs to Clive Cussler and guess that he might be such an author. But go back to 1973. Go back to this book (or Pacific Vortex, which was written even earlier)... The success of Clive Cussler and Dirk Pitt is not a mistake. Even this book, that most fans admit is one of the weaker ones, has clear signs of being a winner. Sure, some of the stuff in this book has dated pretty badly. The many pop culture references for example will be lost on most modern readers. Was Errol Flynn still a household name in the 70s? I don't know. Obviously, the the casual sexism is another thing, although hardly unusual for the time. (See James Bond hitting women: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJWfO... ) The thing that has dated most for me is the massive info dump conversation scenes in the final third of the book. These things go on a bit and are exhausing. I'm pretty sure Cussler paces this stuff out better in his other books. Before reading this book, I read a modern thriller published in 2007. The book wasn't bad mind you, but it became clear just how much better Cussler's writing was in comparison. In Mayday (or the Mediterranean Caper) the plot is convoluted genius. The Greek setting is vivid. The stealth scenes are tense. The action scenes are violent. The villain is intelligent and a credible threat. And crucially, the dialogue is full of comedy and wit to balance out the tension. I have read many 1970s adventure novels (The Excecutioner, The Destroyer, The Death Merchant, The Butcher, The Penetrator, etc) and Cussler's books, even with their problems, are a cut above.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mike Crate

    I originally read The Mediterranean Caper under the title Mayday and to be honest the word Caper should not be used in anything but a spoof, of course many would say the adventures of Dirk Pitt are firmly tongue in cheek:) In this novel Dirk and Al come to the rescue of a US Airforce base under attack from what looks like a WW1 biplane, after fending off the attack with their own PBY they find themselves knee deep in a smuggling operation that has been ongoing for decades. Caught between the US F I originally read The Mediterranean Caper under the title Mayday and to be honest the word Caper should not be used in anything but a spoof, of course many would say the adventures of Dirk Pitt are firmly tongue in cheek:) In this novel Dirk and Al come to the rescue of a US Airforce base under attack from what looks like a WW1 biplane, after fending off the attack with their own PBY they find themselves knee deep in a smuggling operation that has been ongoing for decades. Caught between the US Federal Bureau of Narcotics, Greek Gendarmerie and a very Bond like villain Dirk has to discover and expose the secrets being kept while protecting the NUMA research vessel and his own skin. The novel is a fairly easy going adventure story, over the top of course but each of the events are within the scope of reality, when all put together there is a lot going on and that is when the reader either goes along with the narrative or not. I don't think this novel or the series will ever be a casual read but the early novels were certainly not demanding and for me this is just an enjoyable tale of action and intrigue with a lead character that in the real world doesn't really exist.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lundos

    I remember reading a Dirk Pitt book in high school, though, which one escapes my memory. I've had this one lying around from my father for quite a while and I was in the mood for something different - both in genre and time frame. And I can safely say that time has passed Dirk Pitt. While it can be entertaining to read about an alpha male James Bond wannabe, who always says the 'right thing' to women, Pitt instead comes off as uncharismatic, chauvanistic alcoholic. The story itself is straight fo I remember reading a Dirk Pitt book in high school, though, which one escapes my memory. I've had this one lying around from my father for quite a while and I was in the mood for something different - both in genre and time frame. And I can safely say that time has passed Dirk Pitt. While it can be entertaining to read about an alpha male James Bond wannabe, who always says the 'right thing' to women, Pitt instead comes off as uncharismatic, chauvanistic alcoholic. The story itself is straight forward with a few twists. Unfortunately, the reader doesn't get all the hints for all of minor details, but it isn't hard to guess who the bad guy (he out's himself fairly early) is or how he does it. Overall a bit of a disappointment.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    Ok, I’ve been reading Cussler on and off since the mid 90s, but never his early stuff. This book was published in 1972, so I’m going to attribute its general sexism to that. I’ve heard Pitt referred to by other readers as the “James Bond of the USA”. At one point the main character even introduces himself as Pitt, Dirk Pitt...ugh! But my lame teenage heart is going to guiltily be entertained by the swashbuckling (yeah, I said it) antics of Dirk and his sidekick Al. There’s no accounting for tast Ok, I’ve been reading Cussler on and off since the mid 90s, but never his early stuff. This book was published in 1972, so I’m going to attribute its general sexism to that. I’ve heard Pitt referred to by other readers as the “James Bond of the USA”. At one point the main character even introduces himself as Pitt, Dirk Pitt...ugh! But my lame teenage heart is going to guiltily be entertained by the swashbuckling (yeah, I said it) antics of Dirk and his sidekick Al. There’s no accounting for taste, and I can admit that.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jay Gabler

    Somehow, Cussler’s idea that we should have a nautical American James Bond is so crazy that it just works.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Lesperance

    I really enjoyed Deep Fathom, but this book I found so boring. I thought the way that Teri is written in and how he acts towards her in the start is pretty funny, but the storyline just couldn't keep me interested.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eli Hornyak

    Not as good as Pacific Vortex but I still highly enjoyed it, can't wait to read more in the Dirk Pitt Series

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mandy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Questo libro ha seriamente rischiato di beccarsi due stelline, o addirittura una, ma è riuscito a scamparla salvandosi verso la fine, diciamo dalla metà in poi del libro. Avendo cominciato a leggere le avventure di Dirk Pitt partendo da uno dei libri a metà nella serie - per la precisione con Alta marea - e buttandomi solo più tardi nella lettura delle prime pubblicazioni, ho avuto modo di apprezzare particolarmente l’evoluzione sia della trama che dei personaggi nel passare degli anni. All’auto Questo libro ha seriamente rischiato di beccarsi due stelline, o addirittura una, ma è riuscito a scamparla salvandosi verso la fine, diciamo dalla metà in poi del libro. Avendo cominciato a leggere le avventure di Dirk Pitt partendo da uno dei libri a metà nella serie - per la precisione con Alta marea - e buttandomi solo più tardi nella lettura delle prime pubblicazioni, ho avuto modo di apprezzare particolarmente l’evoluzione sia della trama che dei personaggi nel passare degli anni. All’autore una nota di rimprovero per la situazione iniziale, e una di merito per lo sviluppo e i miglioramenti apportati in seguito. Quello che mi ha più irritato è stato l’inizio. Sebbene io avessi notato, anche con Iceberg e Vortice, che rispetto ai romanzi pubblicati più tardi la struttura era molto meno elaborata e la trama meno riferita a fatti storici, la cosa non mi aveva infastidita più di quel tanto. La storia sembrava comunque avvincente e con una buona trama, ma a circa 50 pagine dall’inizio… Il protagonista incontra una donna sulla spiaggia, e dopo aver ascoltato la sua storia della morte del marito nove anni prima e averla vista con le lacrime agli occhi, le molla un ceffone di punto in bianco, infastidito dalla sua sofferenza. Ora, forse sono io, non saprei, ma dopo un trattamento del genere non avrei certo reagito sorridendo e con un “arrivederci e grazie” - figuriamoci poi con un invito a cena. Anzi, mi chiedo quale donna degna di questo nome si farebbe picchiare da un perfetto sconosciuto, al quale ha oltretutto appena raccontato un avvenimento triste del tuo passato, per poi concedergli le sue grazie e alzarsi soddisfatta. Trovo che il Dirk Pitt più in là con gli anni sia più maturo in questo senso. Si poteva passar sopra il fatto che, pur avendo una relazione diciamo abbastanza stabile con Loren Smith, pensava ancora ai passati amori della sua vita, Summer – in special modo – e Maeve, entrambe morte, quindi come ho detto, passi. Si poteva anche passar sopra alle varie scappatelle che si faceva con varie donne – in ogni libro una diversa – sempre pur avendo questa relazione con Loren – d’altra parte, a chi sarebbe interessata una serie di avventura con protagonista il fidanzato casto e devoto? (in fondo un po’ mi ricorda James Bond) Vorrei comunque solo far notare che nelle mie prime letture – tra cui Sahara – il protagonista era talmente attaccato alla sua futura moglie che io nemmeno avevo capito che avesse una relazione con qualcuna. Un tirato “passi” anche stavolta – mi rendo conto che essendo una donna la cosa mi darà sicuramente più fastidio che non agli uomini, che probabilmente in questo momento si staranno chiedendo in che modo riuscire a imitare il tipo. Ma la violenza sulle donne no. Il fatto che – anche se la cosa viene lasciata un po’ a interpretazione – lei poi possa essersi fatta sedurre apposta per portarlo alla villa dello zio o che gli abbia mentito, non giustifica il ceffone in alcun modo. In quel momento lui credeva che fosse tutto vero, e farsi picchiare di sicuro non era tra i piani di lei. Il fatto poi che lui se ne sia andato fischiettando dopo aver scoperto che qualcuno si era fermato a godersi lo spettacolo, ha rischiato di farmi chiudere il libro di punto in bianco per lasciarlo ad ammuffire tra la polvere, nei meandri della mia stanza. Per precisare meglio la cosa: se questo fosse stato il primo libro della serie capitatomi sotto gli occhi, non ne avrei più preso in mano neanche uno. Soltanto per la meschinità ingannevole del suo inizio, che in un altro caso mi avrebbe impedito di scoprire libri della stessa serie ben più belli, il libro si sarebbe meritato una stella, massimo due, a prescindere dal resto. Solo il fatto di aver letto altri libri con lo stesso protagonista e la speranza che dalla storia uscisse ancora qualcosa di buono mi ha spinto a continuare. E infatti si può dire che in un certo senso sono stata premiata. Una volta arrivata in fondo, lo ammetto, mi è venuta la tentazione di sgridare il libro con una sorta di: “libro cattivo, non si fa!”. Storia buona, a mio parere non tra le migliori, ma l’ho molto apprezzata. Un’altra nota negativa per l’ ”illuminazione finale” che risolve ogni mistero – secondo me, troppo scontata e improvvisa, sembrava messa apposta solo per dare il tempo necessario a salvare la situazione. Quindi, in conclusione: una stellina per l’inizio vile e traditore; ne ho poi date quattro per la buona sensazione che mi ha lasciato il libro quando l’ho finito. Tralasciando quello di cui ho già parlato, il libro mi è piaciuto molto. Comunque la valutazione complessiva, con il senno di poi, si aggira intorno al 3,2.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bhavik Kalpesh

    A perfect book for those who love adventures, in a dangerous way. And the ones who love about ocean and the machines running on water should read this book. A good climax..... The book is somewhat predictable at some points, but it does not have a great effect overall.

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