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All the President's Men PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: All the President's Men
Author: Carl Bernstein
Publisher: Published June 24th 2005 by Pocket Books (first published 1974)
ISBN: 9781416522911
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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This landmark book details all the events of the biggest political scandal in the history of this nation--Watergate. Woodward and Bernstein kept the headlines coming, delivering revelation after amazing revelation to a shocked public. Black-and-white photograph section.

30 review for All the President's Men

  1. 4 out of 5

    Delee

    Re-reading for the 3rd time- I think with what is happening at the moment- it's time. Now there is something to compare what happened then...to what is happening now.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bettie☯

    IMMENT IMMENT IMMENT (Roubley dosh for a flag and a country?) IMMENT Mr Projectionist has the film reeled up, ready to go, for tonight's delectation. The political antics of the last year or so makes this a good time for a re-visit to the Saturday Night Massacre et al. Maybe there will be clues as to how this present scenario will work out. IMMENT The Rachel Maddow Show: 'The echo of Watergate is very strong here': Senator Whitehouse Morning Joe: Echoes of Watergate in the Trump administration IMMENT IMMENT IMMENT (Roubley dosh for a flag and a country?) IMMENT Mr Projectionist has the film reeled up, ready to go, for tonight's delectation. The political antics of the last year or so makes this a good time for a re-visit to the Saturday Night Massacre et al. Maybe there will be clues as to how this present scenario will work out. IMMENT The Rachel Maddow Show: 'The echo of Watergate is very strong here': Senator Whitehouse Morning Joe: Echoes of Watergate in the Trump administration? The Rebels are breaking through: congrats to Macron in France, and Moon in South Korea, hereforth known as Big Mac and Super Moon.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    This book was truly unbelievable. The entire time I was reading it, I kept reminding myself that this was real history and it all happened. There was so much drama in all the proceedings, and to realize that it’s the select few (in great positions) of the government beneath it all. I completely admire the reporting of these two individuals and their endless dedication to get the facts and the information correct and to the public, as well as keep their sources anonymous - I was in awe and amazem This book was truly unbelievable. The entire time I was reading it, I kept reminding myself that this was real history and it all happened. There was so much drama in all the proceedings, and to realize that it’s the select few (in great positions) of the government beneath it all. I completely admire the reporting of these two individuals and their endless dedication to get the facts and the information correct and to the public, as well as keep their sources anonymous - I was in awe and amazement throughout every page.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    Ma'am, have you got any more than just the facts? This first-hand account of the Washington Post reporting that exposed and ultimately led to the demise of Nixon's administration reads very much like a down and dirty summary of the story notes gathered by two young and very self-assured journalists. This is one instance in which the movie was better than the book. The product is not at all a nuanced or rich historical account, but rather an amalgamation of facts, facts, and more facts. While fac Ma'am, have you got any more than just the facts? This first-hand account of the Washington Post reporting that exposed and ultimately led to the demise of Nixon's administration reads very much like a down and dirty summary of the story notes gathered by two young and very self-assured journalists. This is one instance in which the movie was better than the book. The product is not at all a nuanced or rich historical account, but rather an amalgamation of facts, facts, and more facts. While facts certainly do have their place, standing alone they make for a dry and oft times downright tedious read. Man cannot live by facts alone. Missing from this account was any real sense for who these highly placed presidential players were, what motivated them, and how those factors led them to so willingly participate in criminal activity. For that I will have to look elsewhere. Nevertheless, after reading this 336-page newspaper article, I certainly do have a better sense for the who, what, when, and where of the Watergate scandal that rocked the nation at about the same time I was born, and which has remained within the American political and cultural psyche throughout all the years of my life.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Everyone has a book that means something to them far beyond the words printed on pages. The book obviously must have extraordinary content to keep you so engaged, and because of that, it will probably also be intelligent, well-written, and any other quality you'd attribute to great reading. But when you finish the book, you don't really love it because of what you read; you love it because of how what you read made you feel. All the President's Men is that book for me. It is, undoubtedly, my favo Everyone has a book that means something to them far beyond the words printed on pages. The book obviously must have extraordinary content to keep you so engaged, and because of that, it will probably also be intelligent, well-written, and any other quality you'd attribute to great reading. But when you finish the book, you don't really love it because of what you read; you love it because of how what you read made you feel. All the President's Men is that book for me. It is, undoubtedly, my favorite book – not because a hastily published review of investigative journalism procedure is necessarily relevant to my life, but because of what this powerful little book represents to me. I was always weirdly obsessed with politics: one of my earliest memories is aggressively campaigning for Bob Dole in my first grade classroom's mock presidential election (your guess is as good as mine on that choice); I was more obsessed with Clinton scandal than any kid should ever be; I made a "book" about the Florida recount out of cut-out newspaper articles. In summary, I was a hardcore, unabashed, child wonk. All the President's Men was probably the first (adult) political book I ever read, and even though I was way too young to understand or appreciate it, it just made me feel… cool; like, it was okay to obsess over all this, because doing so could actually be of consequence. Also, you don't have to be a nerd to enjoy the intrigue, mystery, and danger within the context of the White House. I can't credit this book with my lifelong passion for politics, but it was probably the book that made me realize that reality is infinitely more fascinating and incredible than any work of fiction could ever be. I can, however, credit this book with making me the only person whose predominant feeling, when alone in a parking garage at night wearing an amazing peacoat, is a sense of sadness that I'm not meeting a secret informant.

  6. 4 out of 5

    KatieMc

    This was probably the first non-fiction grown-up book I ever read. It's a compelling portrayal of an momentous slice of American history and journalism. This evening I went to an American Cinematheque screening of 1976 film adaptation of All The President's Men. Holy hotness, the camera sure does love Robert Redford. And Dustin Hoffman with that awesome shaggy look. This duo had it going on, corduroy suits, big collars and typewriters. Also, All The President's Men also made Deep Throat a household This was probably the first non-fiction grown-up book I ever read. It's a compelling portrayal of an momentous slice of American history and journalism. This evening I went to an American Cinematheque screening of 1976 film adaptation of All The President's Men. Holy hotness, the camera sure does love Robert Redford. And Dustin Hoffman with that awesome shaggy look. This duo had it going on, corduroy suits, big collars and typewriters. Also, All The President's Men also made Deep Throat a household term.

  7. 5 out of 5

    The Just-About-Cocky Ms M

    I have watched my DVD of the movie more than half a dozen times and, as much as I enjoy it each time, I have always thought that something was missing, some key bits of information needed to tie it all together. Well, duh! The book has it all. Not in the tidy, linear progression from the morning after the Watergate break-in through the last explosive story clearly implicating Tricky Dick as in the movie, but rather the more realistic slice-of-life, back and forth and all around movements in searc I have watched my DVD of the movie more than half a dozen times and, as much as I enjoy it each time, I have always thought that something was missing, some key bits of information needed to tie it all together. Well, duh! The book has it all. Not in the tidy, linear progression from the morning after the Watergate break-in through the last explosive story clearly implicating Tricky Dick as in the movie, but rather the more realistic slice-of-life, back and forth and all around movements in search of tips, confirmations, just one more corroborating source so that day's story could be written and printed. Here we see the amazing scoops, the missed targets, dead-end ideas, leaps of faith, and more important, the dogged determination to know the larger story in all its awful complexity and sleazy criminality, using methods necessary in those pre-Google days that would exhaust even the most robust investigative reporter today. The authors write like reporters---no purple prose, no unnecessary verbiage, few if any adjectives and adverbs, in a spare style that would please Sergeant Joe Friday and his predilection for "Just the facts, ma'am." The authors share their successes, and there were many, in a restrained manner just this side of "Aw, shucks," and do not shy away from their faults and close brushes with disaster because they made rookie reporter mistakes or tried pushing a particular envelope not only too far but almost off the table. An excellent tale that, despite the obvious indices of "the way things were back in the day," still resonates today. Perhaps especially today.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Furrawn

    Watergate has been in the news recently because of Trump. I realized that I know next to nothing about Watergate. Being woefully ignorant, my husband and I decided to watch the movie. It was wonderful, and I made a beeline to Amazon to order the book afterwards. Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. Thank God that they pursued the story, always refusing to give up. Not only did Nixon get outed, this story taught people that if something nefarious and wicked is going on I our government, they can speak Watergate has been in the news recently because of Trump. I realized that I know next to nothing about Watergate. Being woefully ignorant, my husband and I decided to watch the movie. It was wonderful, and I made a beeline to Amazon to order the book afterwards. Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. Thank God that they pursued the story, always refusing to give up. Not only did Nixon get outed, this story taught people that if something nefarious and wicked is going on I our government, they can speak up rather than sitting in silence and fear. I think we probably owe a lot of current leaks during this Trump administration to the fact that Woodward and Bernstein taught the citizens of the United States that they can fight for truth, honesty, and justice.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jon(athan) Nakapalau

    The book that opened my eyes to politics...still relevant and (sadly) still not a lesson learned by our politicians.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Siv30

    תיעוד היסטורי של אחת הפרשות המטלטלות בהיסטוריה של ארה"ב פרשת ווטרגייט, מרגע חשיפתה עד להתפטרות הנשיא ניקסון. את הספר כתבו העיתונאים שחשפו את עומק הפרשה מטעם הוושינגטון פוסט. תיאור השתלשלות האירועים נראית כמו מתח בדיוני, אי אפשר להאמין עד כמה רקוב היה הממשל בפעילויותיו תוך שאנשי הממשל מנצלים את טענת " פגיעה בבטחון המדינה" כדי להסתיר מעיניי הציבור את טיב הפעילות הפלילית של אנשיו. אחת הבעיות בספר, לפחות לקורא הישראלי, שרוב הדמויות בסיפור לא מוכרות ולא מעוררות שום הידהוד לכן כאשר הספר נכנס לעומק הפרטים תיעוד היסטורי של אחת הפרשות המטלטלות בהיסטוריה של ארה"ב פרשת ווטרגייט, מרגע חשיפתה עד להתפטרות הנשיא ניקסון. את הספר כתבו העיתונאים שחשפו את עומק הפרשה מטעם הוושינגטון פוסט. תיאור השתלשלות האירועים נראית כמו מתח בדיוני, אי אפשר להאמין עד כמה רקוב היה הממשל בפעילויותיו תוך שאנשי הממשל מנצלים את טענת " פגיעה בבטחון המדינה" כדי להסתיר מעיניי הציבור את טיב הפעילות הפלילית של אנשיו. אחת הבעיות בספר, לפחות לקורא הישראלי, שרוב הדמויות בסיפור לא מוכרות ולא מעוררות שום הידהוד לכן כאשר הספר נכנס לעומק הפרטים מצאתי שאני קוראת מכח האינרציה רק כדי להגיע לחלקים מותחים ומעניינים יותר. גם ההתעסקות בפרטי הפרטים לא תרמה לקשב שלי. ולקראת סוף הספר הקשב שלי התרופף לגמרי. יחד עם זאת, עד עמוד 250 הייתי מרותקת לחלוטין לספר שסחף אותי לגילויים המטלטלים. העיתונאים מתארים צעד אחר צעד את חשיפת שכבות השקרים ומעטפות ההגנה של ניקסון, כשאלה הוסרו לבסוף, הוא התפטר. הם מתארים את הקשיים בהתמודדות העיתונאית להביא לציבור סיפור מבוסס ואת המאבק מול מנגנון משומן של המדינה, שהפעיל שיטות של טירור והפחדה ובמקביל תגמול כספי כדי להניע את האנשים. זוהי עיתונאות חוקרת במיטבה. אני חושבת שמודל העסקה הישן שבו העיתון (או כל כלי תקשורת אחר לצורך העיניין גם טלבזיה) נותן לכתבים גב כלכלי ומשאבים הכלכליים לנהל את החקירות מקעקע את האפשרות לשחד אותם ומאפשר ירידה לחקירת האמת תוך צמצום המחירים האישיים דבר שהיום בעייתי ביותר כאשר רוב אנשי התקשורת הם פרילנסרים וישנן השפעות זרות של בעלי הון ושל הפוליטיקאים על כלי התקשורת.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andrei Tamaş

    Romanul de investigaţie al celor doi reporteri de la Washington Post, Carl Bernstein şi Bob Woordward, publicat în Statele Unite în 1974, a netezit spectrul cu care trebuie privită, la modul abstract, politica. Afacerea Watergate este cu desăvârşire cea mai mare problema de politică internă cu care s-au confruntat Statele Unite până în prezent. Pilonul democraţiei şi idealul "lumii noi" la care au visat iluminiştii secolului al XVIII-lea tindea să se spulbere, în spatele cortinei, la începutul c Romanul de investigaţie al celor doi reporteri de la Washington Post, Carl Bernstein şi Bob Woordward, publicat în Statele Unite în 1974, a netezit spectrul cu care trebuie privită, la modul abstract, politica. Afacerea Watergate este cu desăvârşire cea mai mare problema de politică internă cu care s-au confruntat Statele Unite până în prezent. Pilonul democraţiei şi idealul "lumii noi" la care au visat iluminiştii secolului al XVIII-lea tindea să se spulbere, în spatele cortinei, la începutul celei de-a opta decade a secolului trecut dacă presa liberă nu şi-ar fi asumat sarcina, nu tocmai lipsită de obstacole, de a investiga, fără concursul şi fără sprijinul Ministerului de Justiţie al SUA, spargerea din sediul central al Partidului Democrat (aflat în opoziţie în ceea ce priveşte executivul la vremea respectivă, adică 1972) de la Watergate. Totul pare, la început, un jaf banal, la care participă câţiva cubanezi ce susţin că au fost animaţi de dorinţa de a submina campania democraţilor din pricina ascensiunii stângii din Statele Unite. Ceea ce la început a părut un inocent act politic anticomunist avea să se transforme într-un caz care a ajuns la masa rotundă a Marelui Juriu Federal şi care, cu sprijinul tacit al presei libere, a reuşit să pună sub acuzare "toţi oamenii preşedintelui". Ceea ce a ieşit la iveală a fost faptul că întregul executiv liberal era de fapt un sistem mafiot animat de dorinţa de a păstra puterea. Nixon, liberal fără scrupule, îşi dă demisia în august 1974, după ce mai multe capete de acuzare planau asupra sa, deoarece Constituţia SUA nu permite punerea sub acuzare a Preşedintelui sub raţiunea incalcarii principiului separaţiei puterilor în stat (sic!). Romanul, ecranizat în 1976, cu Dustin Hoffman şi Robert Redford în rolurile celor doi jurnalişti de la Post, rămâne astfel în istorie ca un exponent al necesităţii libertăţii presei, adică a necenzurarii din partea statului, cu toate riscurile ce decurg de aici (adică Antena 3, de pildă). Două aspecte se mai impun. 1. Romanul, deşi îi are ca protagonişti pe reporterii de la Post şi totodată aceştia sunt şi autorii bestsellerului, e scris la persoana a IIIa, ceea ce înlătura o mare parte din încărcătura de subiectivism şi care, totodată, ar fi lipsit scrierea de încrederea cititorului, făcându-l, de fel, mai sceptic. Cu toate acestea, nu se pot nega micile şi nevinovatele exagerări: de pildă, la un moment dat, Woordward, trecând peste interdicţia legală de a cita anumite surse secrete, declara că este gata să meargă la închisoare pentru libertatea presei. E drept că au existat antecedente istorice şi e drept că momentul afirmaţiei sale este unul de maximă tensiune, anume perioada electorală a anului 1972, în urma căreia Nixon a fost reales, însă asta, cel puţin din punctul meu de vedere, discreditează. 2. Romanul nu e pură fantezie. E o realitate istorică asupra căreia nu planează niciun dubiu (principala sursă a reporterilor, directorul adjunct al FBI, care nu a fost citat în articole şi nici în roman, şi-a dezvăluit adevărata identitate în anul 2005). Şi... după cum spune o remarcă descripriva "politica e tot politică", iar electoratul american, după cum se pare, trăieşte în prezent şi ignoră tentativele liberalilor la adresa stabilităţii democraţiei americane (Nixon, Bush... Trump!!), chiar dacă aceştia sunt de un fascism cenzurat (unul dintre cele mai periculoase moduri de a face politică). Tentativele domniilor lor de a submina democraţia nu justifică nicio "necesitate istorică", după cum binevoia s-o numească cineva, cândva. Atât.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Knew the story and still couldn’t put the book down. The movie barely scratches the surface, as does what I’ve learned about it from other sources. Here’s the full story. Exhaustion, fears, doubts, and all. And Woodward and Bernstein are reporters, not storytellers. Real life invents its own story, especially in this case, so that’s not a detriment here. But you can see their hand in this book as soon as they start shaping a story out of the facts and it’s endearing how blunt and unembellished i Knew the story and still couldn’t put the book down. The movie barely scratches the surface, as does what I’ve learned about it from other sources. Here’s the full story. Exhaustion, fears, doubts, and all. And Woodward and Bernstein are reporters, not storytellers. Real life invents its own story, especially in this case, so that’s not a detriment here. But you can see their hand in this book as soon as they start shaping a story out of the facts and it’s endearing how blunt and unembellished it is. Even with that journalistic remove you feel for every single one of these people, maybe even more so because that journalistic remove keeps reminding you, this is real life. I was born into the post-Watergate world. The world these two men helped expose, if not necessarily create. When somebody like Hugh Sloan relates his disillusionment with the people in power— “People in the White House believed they were entitled to do things differently, to suspend the rules, because they were fulfilling a mission; that was the only important thing, the mission.”— what’s hard to believe is that there was a time when that wasn’t accepted fact. What’s surprising is how much innocence we had to lose. Now, the Woodwards and the Bernsteins and the Hugh Sloans are the relic of a bygone era. The good guys. Noble and uncompromising, and I know they still exist somewhere, but as a country I don’t think there’s a return to that idealism. I think we’ve bit the apple for good.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samanta

    I you don't have an extensive background knowledge of this topic (Nixon's presidency, the 1972 elections, who all the president's men actually are), this book might be just a bit too much for you. I felt assaulted by too much data thrown at me in a too fast pace. There were some very interesting parts, and just like a lot of reviews say, it read like a detective thriller, but by the end of it, the story just dragged, and I lost track of who is who, and what is what and whodunit. On the other han I you don't have an extensive background knowledge of this topic (Nixon's presidency, the 1972 elections, who all the president's men actually are), this book might be just a bit too much for you. I felt assaulted by too much data thrown at me in a too fast pace. There were some very interesting parts, and just like a lot of reviews say, it read like a detective thriller, but by the end of it, the story just dragged, and I lost track of who is who, and what is what and whodunit. On the other hand, it spurred enough interest for me to want to learn more about Nixon and the whole affair.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Trin

    Watergate took time. Watergate took time. Watergate took time. -- Mantra for 2018

  15. 5 out of 5

    El

    I was in high school when Richard Nixon died, but I was young and my interests at that time weren't exceptionally political. My concerns at that time had more to do with Kurt Cobain's death just a few weeks prior. That meant more to me than that Nixon guy. I do remember having breakfast at a friend's house around the time of Nixon's death, and her stepfather having trying to have a conversation with me about it. He was a strange guy, and looking back I'm not sure if he was particularly the safes I was in high school when Richard Nixon died, but I was young and my interests at that time weren't exceptionally political. My concerns at that time had more to do with Kurt Cobain's death just a few weeks prior. That meant more to me than that Nixon guy. I do remember having breakfast at a friend's house around the time of Nixon's death, and her stepfather having trying to have a conversation with me about it. He was a strange guy, and looking back I'm not sure if he was particularly the safest guy for me to be around, though at the time he seemed perfectly fine and nice. He liked REO Speedwagon, so y'know, just how creepy could he be? Oh wait. At that particular breakfast he tried to tell me how Nixon hadn't been such a bad guy, that he had gotten a bad reputation but that personally his heart went out to him, because that "whole Watergate stuff" just wasn't his fault. Nixon wasn't involved in all that mess, my friend's stepfather said. He was an innocent man in the wrong place at the wrong time. I didn't get all the particulars. I knew what Watergate was, mostly. I knew there was a huge conspiracy and that Nixon was "not a crook". Even though I wasn't especially into politics at that time, I knew that my opinions were less Republican and less conservative than, say, my friend's stepdad. I had a feeling this guy across the table from me was full of shit. But he meant every word he said. I do believe tears came to his eyes at the memory of Nixon. Whoa there, Tiger. It's probably for the best that that particular friend and I sort of lost track as high school progressed. As I was reading this, that stepdad came back into my memory. I can't remember his name anymore (though I seem to be thinking it was Rick?), but that morning's discussion really stuck with me, probably because it sat so uncomfortably with me at the time. Anytime I hear "Watergate" or "Nixon" I think of him, and I sort of shudder. At the same time, however, it's always been one of those areas in my knowledge of American History that is embarrassingly uninformed. I don't think it even came up that much in our history classes. Good job, teachers! So I guess what I was expecting out of this would be one of those espionage/thriller types of things. Conspiracy and spies and secrets and stuff. What I wasn't expecting was a basically really long newspaper article. Okay, I get it - Woodward and Bernstein were journalists, that's what they do. But I expect my journalists to be writers as well. Don't just state the facts, give me something interesting. There's a list of "characters" in the beginning of the book which I found exceptionally helpful because the authors' descriptions of these people were totally lackluster and, well, boring. I'm sure a lot of those people really were/are boring people. But that doesn't mean they have to be written boringly. Parts of this book were pretty exciting. The way that Woodward and Deep Throat communicated was like the stuff you see in the movies, and it would have been great if the authors had maintained that sort of energy throughout their book. Instead it was just a smattering of facts (all of which are important, don't get me wrong) and names and figures and more names and more figures. Politics doesn't have to be boring! Especially if scandal is involved. Beef up that text, men! Show us what it means to be Pulitzer winners! I can't say I learned a heck of a lot, even with all the facts. This book was written, I understand, because Robert Redford confronted them about buying the film rights if they wrote the book. The book wasn't even in existence yet when that offer was made. So this feels sort of like it was obligatory. They just wanted to get it out there, the ending was short, it feels a bit rushed at times like they wanted to get it out of their hair so they can go on to write the second part (The Final Days). What I certainly did not find (not that I was expecting it) was any sense of sympathy for Nixon or any of his men that were involved in the scandal. I'm pretty sure that was intentional on Woodward and Bernstein's part - they wrote woodenly throughout, but they weren't in business to garner any sympathy for these devils. It makes me think of Rick (if that indeed is his name), and I wonder if he read this book or watched the movie; and if so, how did he feel about it? It's not anything I'd want to sit down over a couple bowls of cereal to talk about now by any stretch of the imagination, but I can't help but wonder. He was likely the first person I had ever met who didn't call Nixon a [your obscenity of choice here]. At that age - mourning the loss of Cobain and otherwise being a sour, angsty young woman who just wanted to make it through her sophomore year - someone so pro-Nixon made an impression on me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    BAM The Bibliomaniac

    2018 Reading Challenge: book set during the decade I was born

  17. 4 out of 5

    David K. Lemons

    When I read this, I had just started my assignment at the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia Cultural Mission located in the Watergate Building on Virginia Avenue in Washington. I could look out of the window and see Howard Johnson's across the street where much of the action took place. I kept my car in the Watergate garage and every time I parked or left at night, I imagined "the plumbers" at work. Entering the building from the garage, I went through the same door that they taped and entered and w When I read this, I had just started my assignment at the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia Cultural Mission located in the Watergate Building on Virginia Avenue in Washington. I could look out of the window and see Howard Johnson's across the street where much of the action took place. I kept my car in the Watergate garage and every time I parked or left at night, I imagined "the plumbers" at work. Entering the building from the garage, I went through the same door that they taped and entered and whenever I walked up the stairs I passed the 6th floor where the Democratic Headquarters was located that they broke into. There was no nostalgia for me reading this book nor feeling close to historical events. I felt despondent that we had a regime that broke the law and was convicted. I did take some pride in the fact that our democratic process worked and stopped corruption at the highest level. I soon expect to be reading another superb account of wrongdoing by a President and his associates (including family) involving the current Trump takeover and corrupt methods of criminal domination. But similar to the financial crisis of 2007, where does corruption in a democracy begin? Doesn't it begin with the ignorance of the little guy, the individual voter, who is gullible, bigoted and stupid like oafs from the Middle Ages? When is the little guy going to be held responsible for giving away our hard earned liberties? My guess is that he and she will be convicted and sentenced to go to war, which is inevitable when your enemies sense that you are weak and unaware and left alone in the chaotic warrens of a prison that expects you to fend for yourself. These are the kinds of questions that "All the President's Men" prompted in me. A really valuable book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shaun

    Recently read The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump in which Nixon and the Watergate scandal were mentioned frequently and thought maybe it was finally time to read. What struck me the most was how mild the Watergate scandal seems compared to the ethical mess that is the Trump Presidency. From blatant nepotism, to major financial and ethical dilemas, to on the record and repeated lying, to possible collusion, and likely obstruction. I was also struck by the similarities between the way Nixon's admi Recently read The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump in which Nixon and the Watergate scandal were mentioned frequently and thought maybe it was finally time to read. What struck me the most was how mild the Watergate scandal seems compared to the ethical mess that is the Trump Presidency. From blatant nepotism, to major financial and ethical dilemas, to on the record and repeated lying, to possible collusion, and likely obstruction. I was also struck by the similarities between the way Nixon's administration demonized the press, essentially dubbing it "fake news," and how they used alternative facts, indignation, and flat out lies to counter the unraveling story just as the Trump team has done.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Such a opportune, marvelous story! I feel like I’m living through great uncertainty, shock and Executive Branch crimes far worse the Watergate. Contemporary nefarious, unprepared, unqualified, lower-IQ characters are getting caught, mostly behind the scenes. Trump is no Nixon but I suspect Trump’s criminal nastiness outplays Tricky Dick. I do believe that Mueller can and will subpoena Trump. I pray he questions him under oath as our President vastly overestimates his own abilities, can’t keep hi Such a opportune, marvelous story! I feel like I’m living through great uncertainty, shock and Executive Branch crimes far worse the Watergate. Contemporary nefarious, unprepared, unqualified, lower-IQ characters are getting caught, mostly behind the scenes. Trump is no Nixon but I suspect Trump’s criminal nastiness outplays Tricky Dick. I do believe that Mueller can and will subpoena Trump. I pray he questions him under oath as our President vastly overestimates his own abilities, can’t keep his story straight and suffers regular temper tantrums and low impulse control. Trump is offering up his own downfall and he seems to be taking his crooked family and a, mostly willing, mendacious GOP with him. Careers will be made and awards will be won in within the “Fake News’ establishment. Careers will be destroyed and sentences will be handed down within the Trump Administration. Reading “All the President’s Men” reminded me that these massive hidden criminal undertakings are a bitch to unravel. Investigators don’t always know whom to believe, how to ask the right questions, where to follow up, how to handle sources or which interrogation techniques to employ. Further complicating things for reporters and Team Mueller is the undesirability of using classified documents. I believe there is some bad shit on Trump that is classified and therefore cannot be used in a regular court of law. They have to nail him with unclassified information. It also takes a team of razor sharp minds to work up an understandable narrative. I believe the story behind Trump-Russia, his shady business deals, his sexcapades and all the decades of cover up are mindboggling. To bore into just one aspect of the obstructer-in-chief, I am focused (separately from this commentary) on the Fusion GPS, or “Steele” dossier. That document and who has a hand where is a wilderness of mirrors for me. Especially since I don’t have access to much. I’m trying to figure it out reading MSM in US and UK and the tweets of reputable counter intel guys, who cannot reveal everything. Motivation and access are key. I have long admired Woodstein’s investigative reporting on Watergate. I got to tour around the WP newsroom and some offices in (most probably 1989) with an editor there. It was one of those indelible moments of my impressionable youth! Fresh out of suburban Michigan into the hallowed Halls of The Post. Woodward and Bernstein were so bright and unrelenting. Thank God Nixon came before Trump so we gained applicable experience with, and new laws re, a criminal WH. Poorly informed and/or Misled Voters “… [T]he public—softened up by three years of speeches from VP Agnew—has less than total confidence in what it reads and hears—particularly the so-called Eastern Establishment media—is true and undistorted by political prejudice.” Apparently, this works. Trumps constant lying is confusing his followers into believing him. His rants harden me. Crimes “… [T]he President of the United States was the head ratfucker.” President Trump is the head shlyuhafucker! Karma will certainly be his next “mistress”. “The President himself has been blackmailed.” This time our president is even an asset run by Putin! “The WH had been willing to subvert … the whole electoral process?” The Kremlin was willing to subvert the whole electoral process? Da. “… [T]he grand conspiracy directed by the President’s men to subvert the electoral process.” This time around the President’s men have names like Vovochka, Mitya and Mishka. “Somehow the bungling seemed reassuring—it tempered the frightening implications of how far the Nixon forces were willing to go to achieve their ends.” I am not (yet) reassured by Trump and his people and all that bungling. I hope I can reminisce with detached amusement. Scapegoating President Nixon’s spox is quoted complaining about the “opposition” in the Watergate stories, which is taken to mean the free press. “The WH had decided that the conduct of the press, not the conduct of the President’s men, was the issue.” So Trumpian it hurts. Bill Bradlee: “This is the hardest hardball that’s ever been played in the town.” Softball in retrospect. “The WH was pitting its credibility against the Washington Post’s, and in the process was giving the paper’s allegations more currency.” FAKE NEWS! SAD! “He [RMN] think the press is out to get him and therefore is disloyal; people who talk to the press are even worse—the enemies within…” So Trumpian. Trump WH trying to ban the use of personal cell phones! The Nixon admin tapped phones to find leakers. Trump bans personal cell phones. Good luck with that! Will have to establish police state first, Knucklehead. Process Trump’s fury toward Jeff Sessions: “… the President’s willingness to cooperate with one inquiry and not another—the grand jury’s proceedings would be secret, and under the supervision of the administration’s Justice Department. The Senate hearings would be public, and independent of the Executive.” Too late! “The covert activities involve the whole US intel community and are incredible.” This time our very stable genius has managed to piss off the whole US intel community! “Watergate was a brazen and daring assault, led by Nixon himself, against the heart of American democracy: the Constitution, our system of free elections, the rule of law.” And , one more time, the crooks have and will be brought to justice. Despite Trump’s desire, this is not Russia. “In the summer of 1974, it was neither the press nor the Democrats who rose up against Nixon, but the president’s own Republican Party.” Ain’t gonna play out that way this time. GOP has savaged its brand beyond repair. Trump lead them off a cliff. SAD! The time that Nixon actually told the truth in his televised address to the nation: “It was the system that has brought the facts to light . . . a system that in this case has included a determined grand jury, honest prosecutors, a courageous judge, … and a vigorous free press.” Go Team Mueller! “The President sat down in his chair stunned, like someone had hit him in the head with a rock.” Trump? Orange, crushed. Unravelling Deep Throat (Mark Felt): “It’s building and they see it and they know they can’t stop the real story from coming out. That’s why they are so desperate.” It’s a lovely thing to watch in real time. Watch Trump’s nonverbal signals with the volume off. Disintegration. Resign already. It’ll take SOME of the pressure off. “… [O]ld loyalties shattered, little work getting done, confusion about who on the staff might be indicted, who would resign and who would be saved. It’s every man for himself—get a lawyer and blame everyone else.” “Any congressional investigation is going to have a big problem unless they get someone from the inside to crack…. Part of the strategy would involve a broad claim of executive privilege to prevent investigators from subpoenaing WH and DoJ records.” “Government investigations were underway, and the instinct for survival could turn some of the President’s men into informers.” Misha Flynn, Felix Slater, George “Coffee Boy” Papadapoulos…. They way Trump throws people under the avtobus, his own family should turn on him. “Unreal atmosphere around the WH—realizing it is curtains on the one hand and on the other trying to laugh it off and go on with business. President has fits of ‘dangerous depression.” All of Trumps crimes and unforced errors are taking a yooge toll. He seems both unfit and unwell, mentally and emotionally. I can imagine his staff are all pretty miserable. If not, they should be. This madness has got to end sooner than 3 years “[RMN], his subordinates were saying, had become a prisoner in his own house—secretive, distrustful even of those who were attempting to plead his cause, combative, sleepless. He would only talk to “millionaire business men who were his long-time personal friends.” Wow. The only thing missing is Twitter and a smart phone. Apparently, Trump spills to his rich, fat cat friends on the phone after dinner and reads leaks in the “FAKE NEWS” the next day. In other words, Trump is leaking while trying to grab staff personal phones. Very stable, subtle genius. Conclusion “Nixon had lost his moral authority as president. His secret tapes—and what they reveal—will probably be his most lasting legacy on them, he’s heard talking almost endlessly about what would be good for him, his place in history, and, above all, his grudges, animosities, sand schemes for revenge. The dog that never seems to bark is any discussion of what is good and necessary for the well-being of the nation.” Don’t cover up your crimes by obstructing justice. You are a man, not a king. Nice try, MF.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey M

    Spectacular. Lessons learned from this book: 1. It takes a LOT. OF. People. to run a White House. And a newspaper. This books serves as a great sketch of the procedural sides of being both investigative news journalists and presidential aides. 2. There are very specific things you can and can't write in a newspaper. I don't know if it's true today, but I was impressed by how often Woodward and Bernstein would be rebuffed by their editor and told to find a second source to confirm a fact. One pers Spectacular. Lessons learned from this book: 1. It takes a LOT. OF. People. to run a White House. And a newspaper. This books serves as a great sketch of the procedural sides of being both investigative news journalists and presidential aides. 2. There are very specific things you can and can't write in a newspaper. I don't know if it's true today, but I was impressed by how often Woodward and Bernstein would be rebuffed by their editor and told to find a second source to confirm a fact. One person talking does not a story validate. 3. When reading quotes from politicians, if they don't give a flat-out confirmation or denial when asked a question, know that there are about 15 things they are probably withholding from you at that moment: players' names, intent, schisms in the ranks, motives, etc. 4. Nixon was rotten. I always felt a little sorry for him in the past, and I still do, but now I do, NOT because he lost the presidency in the most ignominious way possible, but because he chose to surround himself with militant, morally-elastic yesmen that built him a reelection machine that embezzled money and was in the habit of actively breaking the law to defeat opponents. Disgusting. 5. It was fun to read the book knowing that Mark Felt is Deepthroat (I've even been to the garage parking spot where they met!). This book made me reexamine every place he was mentioned, inserting the phrase "number 2 at FBI HQ" in between his lines. I have come to the conclusion that he was brave, but also that he was just a DC bro, buddies with Woodward and willing to bend the rules to make them fairer for the newspapers and the public they were informing. 3. Love Bob Woodward. There's a reason he and Bernstein are infamous. There's a reason parts of this book were published first in GQ. These men are entertaining writers. They know how to grip you, how to make you feel like you're part of the club, and how to make you empathize with whomever they want you to empathize with. All in all, a great book by the people who authored a paradigm-shattering chapter of American history. Not recommended for audible books, because there are so many players involved and it's hard to keep them straight even while reading. They placed a handy-dandy list of all the men and their titles at the beginning of the book, and I constantly flipped back to it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ben Kintisch

    If everything Bush does makes you queasy, here's a book remedy for your troubled stomach: Learn all about the skeezy Nixon whitehouse! Great spytastic scenes with DeepThroat, the best named secret source ever. Makes you wonder...did Woodward and Bernsteing love porn? Does deepthroat the pornstar love politics? And what do we think Bill Clinton thinks about all of this?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Carolien

    Such an important book to read in the current global context.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    You might ask why I read this book now. After I finished it I asked myself why everyone isn't reading it these days. I had watched the movie, Mark Felt (about the FBI special agent who was known by Bob Woodward only as Deep Throat during the Watergate investigation.) That led me to watch the movie by the same title made from the book All the President's Men. The movie was good but I felt there might be more to know, so I read the book. In 1970 I had my first son followed by another in 1973. We w You might ask why I read this book now. After I finished it I asked myself why everyone isn't reading it these days. I had watched the movie, Mark Felt (about the FBI special agent who was known by Bob Woodward only as Deep Throat during the Watergate investigation.) That led me to watch the movie by the same title made from the book All the President's Men. The movie was good but I felt there might be more to know, so I read the book. In 1970 I had my first son followed by another in 1973. We were hippies and we hated Nixon because of our protest against the Vietnam War and because of the Kent State shootings. For some reason, I paid no attention to the Watergate scandal. I blame that on being sleep deprived and living in what my sisters and I call "the baby zone." In fact until I saw Mark Felt I was still hazy on what Watergate was all about. Both movies made me aware that we are in a similar situation now, in my opinion, with an unstable President who attacks the press and is under investigation for illegal activities regarding his election to the office. Though both movies were excellent, the book is indeed better and more informative. It gives the entire blow-by-blow account of Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward's and Carl Bernstein's investigative reporting on Watergate and how that contributed to Nixon's resignation. It is a thrilling though terrible account of criminal behavior and cover ups instigated by President of the United States Richard Nixon and carried out by the men closest to him. It was the #2 non fiction bestseller in 1974. Though Watergate seems almost tame in comparison to today, the story shows the importance of a free press when the American public needs to push back against branches of our federal government, the FBI, and the federal justice system. Exciting, sobering and so timely. I am so glad I read it. It gave me hope and restored the shaky state of my confidence in our democracy.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pete daPixie

    Here is one of those books that I never caught up with, having seen the Redford/Hoffman movie version. The 40th anniversary of original publication of 'All The President's Men' is almost here, and I finally catch up on Bernstein and Woodward's Pulitzer winner. Not before time, indeed! If this plot were featured in a fictional storyline, many would be the calls that this tale is as far fetched as crap from China. Ridiculous to believe that such scandalous crimes could be contrived from the centre Here is one of those books that I never caught up with, having seen the Redford/Hoffman movie version. The 40th anniversary of original publication of 'All The President's Men' is almost here, and I finally catch up on Bernstein and Woodward's Pulitzer winner. Not before time, indeed! If this plot were featured in a fictional storyline, many would be the calls that this tale is as far fetched as crap from China. Ridiculous to believe that such scandalous crimes could be contrived from the centre of democratic government. Burglary, illegal wire tapping, espionage, sabotage, bombing, CIA spooks, death threats, lies and cover-ups. The cast of characters involved was just as astounding as their crimes. Including Cuban exile burglars operated by CIA operatives. A former Secretary of Commerce. A Director of Public Affairs. Attorneys. A former Attorney General. A former Assistant Attorney General. Attorney General of the United States. Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs. Personal Attorney to the President. White House Chief of Staff. Acting Director of the FBI, and at the head of this pile, the President of the United States. Thankfully there was to be no whitewash in the White House. Bernstein and Woodward's detective story from the Washington Post, written in the third person, shoots off the line on June 17th 1972 and blazes a relentless trail of investigative journalism all the way to the finish line. Forgive my insatiable distrust of our great and revered leaders, but I am left unsure of the motives behind Howard Hunt's escapade into the Watergate's foggy bottom. Just what was destroyed in those files by the Acting Director of the FBI, or for that matter, who was Deep Throat and what was his agenda? A line from Robert Graves comes to mind. Let all the poisons that lurk in the mud, hatch out.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bailey

    This is such an important story, and it reminded me that unraveling these things takes time and patience. I will say that because it is written almost in real time of the events happening, it's hard to get a handle on the big picture unless you know where it's headed and what it all means. I would definitely recommend reading a brief overview of Watergate or watching the movie first, because this is very detailed and helps you understand how it all happened, but it doesn't give you the broad stro This is such an important story, and it reminded me that unraveling these things takes time and patience. I will say that because it is written almost in real time of the events happening, it's hard to get a handle on the big picture unless you know where it's headed and what it all means. I would definitely recommend reading a brief overview of Watergate or watching the movie first, because this is very detailed and helps you understand how it all happened, but it doesn't give you the broad strokes, really. This remains a very important story in American history and i am so glad I've finally read the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katherine 黄爱芬

    Keuletan, kegigihan dan ketekunan pasti akan membuahkan hasil. Itulah yang dilakukan duo wartawan Washington Post, Carl Bernstein & Bob Woodward. Walaupun kepribadian mereka berdua bertolak belakang, sering berselisih pendapat, tetapi tidak menggoyahkan kekuatan tim mereka utk saling bahu-membahu kasus Watergate yang menjadi terkenal karena mengakibatkan impeachment dan pengunduran diri Presiden AS, Richard M. Nixon. Dimulai dgn ditangkapnya 5 orang dalam pembobolan gedung Partai Demokrat (ri Keuletan, kegigihan dan ketekunan pasti akan membuahkan hasil. Itulah yang dilakukan duo wartawan Washington Post, Carl Bernstein & Bob Woodward. Walaupun kepribadian mereka berdua bertolak belakang, sering berselisih pendapat, tetapi tidak menggoyahkan kekuatan tim mereka utk saling bahu-membahu kasus Watergate yang menjadi terkenal karena mengakibatkan impeachment dan pengunduran diri Presiden AS, Richard M. Nixon. Dimulai dgn ditangkapnya 5 orang dalam pembobolan gedung Partai Demokrat (rival partai Republik) di kawasan Watergate, di Washington, DC. Hal ini menggelitik naluri investigasi duo wartawan ini, ada apa dibalik pembobolan gedung ini? Dan hasil investigasi mereka selama berbulan-bulan terbayar semua jerih payah mereka, menyingkap organisasi gunung es bertangan gurita dari para anak buah Presiden ini yang penuh konspirasi, skandal uang yang sangat mencengangkan pada masanya dan pada akhirnya menyeret pula sampai ke puncak tertinggi, Mr. President. Tidak semua investigasi mereka berjalan mulus, mereka pun sempat terseok-seok dan tersandung kesalahan fatal juga sehingga harus kembali lagi ke titik awal penyelidikan mereka. Namun mereka tidak putus asa, tetap gigih dan tekun mencari "lubang-lubang" dalam penyidikan, menelepon orang-orang yang diharapkan memberikan kepada mereka informasi, menyusun berita, tetap berhubungan baik dgn narasumber mereka walau banyak juga yang mengecohkan beritanya. Sebagai pembaca, saya terpesona dan tergiring utk membaca kata demi kata, kalimat demi kalimat yang begitu detail dan informatif. Perlahan kita diajak utk merasakan ikut serta menyelidiki dan membayangkan jatuh bangunnya duo ini dalam mengejar berita. Walau buku ini non fiksi, duo wartawan ini lumayan lihai menyusupkan kepribadian2 karakter tokoh2 yang mereka temui, sehingga kita bisa membayangkan seperti apa mereka sebenarnya. Tetapi sayangnya buku ini tetap ada kelemahannya terutama utk pembaca awam sejarah Presiden-Presiden AS, karena jika tidak mengetahui kenapa Partai Demokrat sedemikian rupa diincar utk dibobol/disadap oleh orang-orang Republik, niscaya akan menimbulkan kebingungan total bagi para pembaca pemula. Saya beruntung karena sebelumnya saya pernah membaca buku Masukkan Kekuatan ke Dalam Kepribadian Anda by Florence Littauer yang membahas kepribadian-kepribadian Presiden AS dari Roosevelt hingga Clinton. Jadi kurang lebih saya mengetahui sedikit bayangan ttg karakter sang Tricky Dicky aka Richard M. Nixon yang super paranoid dan penuh rahasia. Dan kejengkelan beliau terhadap klan Kennedy tidak dibahas juga dalam buku ini. Saya beruntung lagi karena kebetulan dulu pernah membaca Biografi Jackie Kennedy - A Woman Named Jackie by David C. Heymann dan Dinasti Kennedy by John H. Davis , jadi sudah mengetahui kurang lebih sejarah gelap hubungan politik antara klan Kennedy dgn Nixon. Terlalu banyak tokoh-tokoh yang terlibat seputar penyelidikan ini, lumayan membuat pusing orang-orang yang tidak terbiasa membaca dgn begitu banyak orang2 yang terlibat. Terkadang juga tidak diberitahu jabatannya, sehingga saya harus balik ke halaman pertama utk mengingat kembali jabatan tokoh-tokohnya. Membaca buku ini saya jadi membandingkan kejadian ini mirip Sam Kok dimana terjadi "pertempuran 3 faksi: Kepresidenan, Pers, dan Kejaksaan". Seru luar biasa karena masing-masing pihak saling berusaha "menggetok" dan menelanjangi kebobrokan. Bagi pecinta buku sejarah dan detektif non fiksi, buku ini layak utk Anda koleksi.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    I picked this book up out of a sense of depression about our current national politics. I thought I knew the story of Watergate, but it turns out that what I knew barely scratched the surface. The book is tightly written, so tightly that sometimes it seems cursory. The first 50 pages are particularly hard to get a handle on because so many names and job positions are being thrown at the reader in quick succession without much explanation. It may mimic the way Woodward and Bernstein felt when the I picked this book up out of a sense of depression about our current national politics. I thought I knew the story of Watergate, but it turns out that what I knew barely scratched the surface. The book is tightly written, so tightly that sometimes it seems cursory. The first 50 pages are particularly hard to get a handle on because so many names and job positions are being thrown at the reader in quick succession without much explanation. It may mimic the way Woodward and Bernstein felt when they began their investigation. However, once you figure out the who the major players are, the book is hard to put down. Written in a terse, reporter-like style, Woodward and Bernstein simply retell their investigation and where it lead. The most exciting part of the book for me was when they published a big break in the story (in October, 1972), and then realized that they got at least one of their details wrong. Some things that surprised me: 1. It's amazing how quickly you forget what research looked like before the internet. Woodward and Bernstein have to WORK to track down even the most mundane information, like what a certain job title means, or whether or not someone works at the White House. 2. The various rules and customs that rule a newsroom. I found most of these to be both interesting and comforting. I don't know if this is still how newspapers like the Washington Post are run, but if they are, there's not too much danger of fake news. 3. How deep and high and wide ran the corruption! I had no idea. In some ways it was a comfort to realize that we've had an entirely corrupt administration in the White House before, and thankfully the country managed to pull through and, at least in some ways (I hope?) put it in the past and behave differently. 4. Breaking this story open was a collaborative effort. By that I don't just mean Woodward and Bernstein worked together (they did), but that multiple other news agencies were investigating and at times discovered important information before Woodward and Bernstein. I had the impression that it was all them, from start to finish. Now I'm just hoping for another Woodward and Bernstein!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sherri

    I was only a toddler when Watergate happened, and so I grew up hearing about it during history lessons. So, I thought I would have nothing new to learn about Watergate when I read this book at the urging of a friend. This book is an account of the reporting by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein of the Watergate scandal. I think it would have had more of an impact on me if I read the book at the time it was initially published. However, 35+ years later, my takeaway from the book is perhaps quite dif I was only a toddler when Watergate happened, and so I grew up hearing about it during history lessons. So, I thought I would have nothing new to learn about Watergate when I read this book at the urging of a friend. This book is an account of the reporting by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein of the Watergate scandal. I think it would have had more of an impact on me if I read the book at the time it was initially published. However, 35+ years later, my takeaway from the book is perhaps quite different than expected. What initially struck me was the determination and dedication of Woodward and Bernstein as journalists - the exhaustive investigation. The willingness to challenge the administration. The quest for the truth. I may be cynical, but I feel that level of journalism is sadly missing in today's world. I feel that the Washington Post and other major newspapers would not support that level of journalism - and the scandal it would reap upon an administration - for fear of retribution and being shut out of access to the Presidential administration. I'm scratching my head trying to recall any stories during the Bush or Obama administration that seriously challenge the administration based upon journalist reporting. In particular, I'm thinking of the Iraq war and the lack of weapons of mass destruction. Indeed, I would think that the Washington Post in particular would be sensitive to The Patriot Act and the potential for abuse considering the level of abuse by the Nixon administration in wiretapping. I found myself nostalgic for a time when reporters could report, regardless of the potential for retribution. My other take-away from this book is how little I was shocked by the Nixon administration's actions. I think part of my lack of shock may stem from growing up knowing that this happened and Nixon resigned. The other reason I suspect lack of shock is because I feel like the "shadow" tactics of the Nixon administration - the political sabotage - having protestors show up for rallies, spreading false rumors, leaking negative information - is par for the course in today's political world. I couldn't help but think - what's the big deal. The difference today is that it is easier with the internet and arguably news organizations that are more focused on propaganda than unbiased news reporting.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Clare O'Beara

    This quintessential tale of investigative journalism is told in third person by the two reporters for the Washington Post who took a minor local break-in item and delved deep into the cellars of the White House. Of course, other publications were on the story and sometimes scooped them but Bernstein and Woodward made a dedicated team and found reliable sources. The text is full of names, phone calls, visits to homes, checks on allegations, long days and nights, protection of sources, court visits This quintessential tale of investigative journalism is told in third person by the two reporters for the Washington Post who took a minor local break-in item and delved deep into the cellars of the White House. Of course, other publications were on the story and sometimes scooped them but Bernstein and Woodward made a dedicated team and found reliable sources. The text is full of names, phone calls, visits to homes, checks on allegations, long days and nights, protection of sources, court visits. If you find it sounds like hard work, well it was hard work. Some of the most interesting aspects are contrasts between then and now - now we have Google, mobile phones and an abundance of on-line photos and CCTV, while few females are named and all but one are in a subordinate position. The exception is the owner of the Washington Post, Katharine Graham, who was on the receiving end of sexist remarks and who, as publisher, would have been ultimately responsible if the paper had published libels. Political power is examined and the efforts of Nixon to remain in power which led to a secret slush fund to pay for underhanded actions. Such as bugging offices, phone taps, false allegations, rigging votes and comments, upsetting the opposition party's rallies and paying for lawyers for burglars. While we clearly need a free press and those serving the state have a duty to communicate, I also have to wonder how elected representatives and civil servants are supposed to get any work done, if they are to be phoned daily by reporters from every major newspaper and expected to make comments. I recommend watching the film which speeds up the months of constant work required to crack this case and shows the hectic and disciplined nature of the Post's offices.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    This was the first hand report of the incredible Watergate break in. The story was confusing and I was not able to appreciate all of what they uncovered until much later. I saw the movie after reading the book and I was able to make more sense of the events after that. Woodward and Bernstein are reporters and they stumble upon all these loose ends that they are able to successfully put together that eventually led to the bringing down a president and his corrupt associates. It was an important b This was the first hand report of the incredible Watergate break in. The story was confusing and I was not able to appreciate all of what they uncovered until much later. I saw the movie after reading the book and I was able to make more sense of the events after that. Woodward and Bernstein are reporters and they stumble upon all these loose ends that they are able to successfully put together that eventually led to the bringing down a president and his corrupt associates. It was an important book at the time and it had huge ramifications for everyone involved. It was also when people my age lost their political innocence. It is almost an unbelievable story.

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