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New New Thing: How Silicon Valley Defines the Ways We Think and Live As We Enter a New Century PDF, ePub eBook


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Title: New New Thing: How Silicon Valley Defines the Ways We Think and Live As We Enter a New Century
Author: Michael Lewis
Publisher: Published October 1st 1999 by Ulverscroft Large Print Books, Ltd. (first published 1999)
ISBN: 9781840323313
Status : FREE Rating :
4.6 out of 5

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New York Times Bestseller. “A superb book. . . . [Lewis] makes Silicon Valley as thrilling and intelligible as he made Wall Street in his best-selling Liar’s Poker.”—TimeIn the weird glow of the dying millennium, Michael Lewis set out on a safari through Silicon Valley to find the world’s most important technology entrepreneur. He found this in Jim Clark, a man whose achie New York Times Bestseller. “A superb book. . . . [Lewis] makes Silicon Valley as thrilling and intelligible as he made Wall Street in his best-selling Liar’s Poker.”—TimeIn the weird glow of the dying millennium, Michael Lewis set out on a safari through Silicon Valley to find the world’s most important technology entrepreneur. He found this in Jim Clark, a man whose achievements include the founding of three separate billion-dollar companies. Lewis also found much more, and the result—the best-selling book The New New Thing—is an ingeniously conceived history of the Internet revolution.

30 review for New New Thing: How Silicon Valley Defines the Ways We Think and Live As We Enter a New Century

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

    This is a book which would be of interest to investors and to computer engineers. I read The New New Thing because Michael Lewis is one of the very best investigative journalists of our times. His research into the business side of Silicon Valley during the 1980s and 1990s provides information only those who read the scientific journals would have knowledge of. His biography of Jim Clark tells of his desire to design a robotic sailboat. This has now been accomplished. Students from the Universit This is a book which would be of interest to investors and to computer engineers. I read The New New Thing because Michael Lewis is one of the very best investigative journalists of our times. His research into the business side of Silicon Valley during the 1980s and 1990s provides information only those who read the scientific journals would have knowledge of. His biography of Jim Clark tells of his desire to design a robotic sailboat. This has now been accomplished. Students from the University of British Columbia, in Canada, designed a robotic boat named Ada that sailed from Newfoundland to Portugal to Florida. Unmanned it survived the wretched hurricanes of 2017 in the Atlantic Ocean. I was very interested to read that this was an idea that originated in Silicon Valley back in the 1990s, a pet project of the ultra successful Jim Clark. Jim Clark the brilliant businessman and computer scientist has the ability to turn a simple idea into a technology company worth billions. He did this with four companies Silicon Grafics, Netscape, Healtheon WebMD and myCFO.The venture capitalists were taking by far the largest profit from the technical inventions of the hard working and talented engineers. Clark got wise to this and took steps to make things fair for his employees. Silicon Valley though home of casually dressed young people is anything but laid back. The competition to stay in the forefront of every new technological breakthrough is fierce. The U.S. and Canada have been surpassed in their quest for acquiring brilliant engineers. The educational system designed in India under Nehru in the 1960s has produced the top computer engineers in the world. Each year the top 2000 students there are given entrance to and full scholarships to the highly rated Indian Institutes of Technology. Many of these graduates leave India to work in Silicon Valley. It is important to note that this book is not new. It was written in 1999. There is a epilogue in the edition I read in which updated information is given. One of the new new things in the lifetime of most people who would be reading this book is the new engineers. They are computer engineers and many of them do not know how the engine on a ship is constructed. This is shown when the engine in Clark's yacht Hyperion continually broke down. They were only able to fix the problem if it had something to do with the signal coming from the computers. There is always value in the old, old thing too.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark Ruzomberka

    It is hard to fathom Jim Clark, whom this book is really about, lead three different Billion Dollar companies: Silicon Graphics, Netscape, and Healtheon (WebMD). He and his companies are the focus of this book. The author also gives a heck of a review of the crazy times that were the late 1990s in technology but as well as the stock market. I think Biff Tannen (you know Biff from Back to the Future) would have been better off with this book than his Sports Almanac. Imagine knowing the exact comp It is hard to fathom Jim Clark, whom this book is really about, lead three different Billion Dollar companies: Silicon Graphics, Netscape, and Healtheon (WebMD). He and his companies are the focus of this book. The author also gives a heck of a review of the crazy times that were the late 1990s in technology but as well as the stock market. I think Biff Tannen (you know Biff from Back to the Future) would have been better off with this book than his Sports Almanac. Imagine knowing the exact companies to pick in the stock market during the tech stock bubble. Not only that but when to take your money off the table and out of the market. After having read first Moneyball, then the Blindside it was wired to go backwards and read one of Michael Lewis's earlier works. He has certainly improved as time has gone forward. This book seemed a bit more raw, and less polished than his later works. It was nice to walk through the time line of the internet bubble again and think back to when the most legally created money was happening in history. Again this is why I think Biff would have been better off with this than the almanac from Back to the Future. Our good friend Biff probably would have had a hard time finding his way to Vegas to make a legal bet. Just as in the line from the book "Change leads to wealth and wealth means money", in Biff's case or Jim Clark's. It was shocking to find out the main reason Clark pushed for the Netscape IPO was to finance his boat. In fact the story of the boat he built felt really disjointed but they do tie together Silicon Valley and starting up companies with building a computerized yacht. I really despise the fact Jim created myCFO. To create yet another company after he has already start 3 with such a simple concept is irritating to us mere mortals. I would say only three groups of people would enjoy this book: 1. Michael Lewis Fans 2. Tech nerds who want to hear the inside story of SGI and Netscape 3. People from the valley who want to recall the gold old days Other than those groups you can probably skip this one. Well, that is unless you have a time machine and want to make some serious money in the stock market.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    “Never was a man’s love of risk so beautifully amplified by his environment as Clark’s was in Silicon Valley.” ― Michael Lewis, The New New Thing: A Silicon Valley Story I did like Lewis' exploration of the relationship of Investment banking and the information technology companies that seemed to weed up in Silicon Valley during the late 90s. The normal venture technology relationship seemed to invert in Silicon Valley. Power shifted from the money men to the idea men, or perhaps not even the ide “Never was a man’s love of risk so beautifully amplified by his environment as Clark’s was in Silicon Valley.” ― Michael Lewis, The New New Thing: A Silicon Valley Story I did like Lewis' exploration of the relationship of Investment banking and the information technology companies that seemed to weed up in Silicon Valley during the late 90s. The normal venture technology relationship seemed to invert in Silicon Valley. Power shifted from the money men to the idea men, or perhaps not even the idea men, but the risk men, the development men. It was, and still is, a bit of an aberration in business space and time. This book focuses on Jim Clark, who ended up wet-nursing three different IT start-ups (Silicon Graphics, Netscape, and Healtheon). Like his fellow Princeton New New Journalism master, John McPhee, Michael Lewis does a phenomenal job of finding and fleshing out the exact right person to serve as the locus for an even bigger story. This book is nominally focused on Jim Clark, but really is about the technology bubble of the late 1990s. Jim Clark just happens to be a near perfect example of the best and worst of that particular place and time in America's economy. Not my favorite Lewis. Not because it isn't well written, but mainly subject matter. I'm more of a value man (Graham & Dodd), not a kamikaze investor. The whole idea of the New New thing is both interesting and a bit repellant to me. I love disruptive businesses, but I'm just not a fan of the smoke and mirrors of the early parts of these businesses.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    My least favorite of the in-depth Lewis books, but that's not saying much. Unlike Liar's Poker, which Lewis thought would bring sweeping change by bringing some sketchy practices to light but still rings true, The New New Thing feels dated now, 10 years later. Nonetheless, as someone who understood the late 1990s tech boom only peripherally, this book was insightful, both in terms of those companies' business models (or lack thereof, as the case may be) and some of the relevant personalities. (S My least favorite of the in-depth Lewis books, but that's not saying much. Unlike Liar's Poker, which Lewis thought would bring sweeping change by bringing some sketchy practices to light but still rings true, The New New Thing feels dated now, 10 years later. Nonetheless, as someone who understood the late 1990s tech boom only peripherally, this book was insightful, both in terms of those companies' business models (or lack thereof, as the case may be) and some of the relevant personalities. (Still important: Larry Ellison, John Doerr) Although I doubt commercial interest warrants, this book could use an updated epilogue, particularly surrounding Healtheon/WebMD, which I have to think does not at all match the original vision. As usual, very well written and engaging; always the case with Lewis. I didn't find Jim Clark as sympathetic as I think I was intended to, and as a result some of the chapters focused on him personally (especially his flying a helicopter, and sailing his boat across the Atlantic) dragged a bit.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Richard Block

    Hero Worshipping the Devil Michael Lewis - one of my favourites - often centres his books around heroes - whether nice or nasty - and the New New Thing has his most blatant hero so far - Jim Clark. He is as repulsive as a hero gets, often confusing us with his selfish, ludicrous behaviour. Lewis falls for Clark like a high school sweetheart - blindly in love, yet somehow keeping enough of his senses to avoid being buggered to death. Jim Clark is a genius, and as such invites our sympathy. Having a Hero Worshipping the Devil Michael Lewis - one of my favourites - often centres his books around heroes - whether nice or nasty - and the New New Thing has his most blatant hero so far - Jim Clark. He is as repulsive as a hero gets, often confusing us with his selfish, ludicrous behaviour. Lewis falls for Clark like a high school sweetheart - blindly in love, yet somehow keeping enough of his senses to avoid being buggered to death. Jim Clark is a genius, and as such invites our sympathy. Having an unusual background - A Plainview Texas failure, Clark develops his genius gradually, somehow getting degrees and graduate degrees in physics, computer science and engineering. He develops computer graphics and becomes rich with Silicon Graphics. But he has no time for the money men. He wants to help engineers (like himself) make fortunes. Then he decides the future is in a home device (The TV) that can run your life. He changes his mind - it is the PC and internet that will change life. He starts Netscape, makes another bigger fortune, but is screwed by Microsoft. Clark is a mini devil compared to Gates (if you don't hate Gates by now, read this!). He becomes besotted with money, and falls off the greed wagon. He builds computer operated mega sailboats. He goes loopy. Then he starts Healtheon, an awful internet interface in the US healthcare market. The book ends with him becoming even more ridiculously rich. It is this idiot, Clark, who started the idea of companies getting rich off hype, the new, new thing, and the gullibility of venture capitalists and the stock market. The book is great when it stays on Clark, but Lewis goes overboard over the boating episodes, which are dull. Normally I like Lewis's weird heroes, like Billy Bean (Moneyball). but Clark is a big, red faced jerk. How he became rich and bored is only slightly interesting, I haven't bothered following him up - like what happened next, mostly because I don't really care about him that much. Of course, it is a fascinating tale well told, for the most part. Only Clark is not much of a hero - more a rich ass**le.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Lewis, Michael, (1999) The New New Thing, W.W. Norton & Company, New York, NY. A witty and insightful look into the entrepreneurial ecosystem in Silicon Valley, told as a story of the adventures of Jim Clark, a serial entrepreneur. One of the best books ever written on the Valley.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Lackey

    This is a story about Jim Clark -- he started multiple important Silicon Valley companies (SGI, Netscape, myCFO, and Healtheon), did some important research in computer graphics, and built one of the world's largest megayachts. However, his biggest and most lasting impact was breaking the Microsoft stranglehold on the entire technology/startup ecosystem by involving the DOJ when Microsoft tried to shake down Netscape. Overall, this book does a great job of describing the late-1990s Silicon Valley This is a story about Jim Clark -- he started multiple important Silicon Valley companies (SGI, Netscape, myCFO, and Healtheon), did some important research in computer graphics, and built one of the world's largest megayachts. However, his biggest and most lasting impact was breaking the Microsoft stranglehold on the entire technology/startup ecosystem by involving the DOJ when Microsoft tried to shake down Netscape. Overall, this book does a great job of describing the late-1990s Silicon Valley (it was published in 1999, well before the collapse), as well as Jim Clark's own unique style and personality. It's one of the most authentic and accurate accounts of the period I've read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Riku Sayuj

    First let down by Lewis for me. Slightly more detailed review to follow.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Remo

    Este libro ha envejecido, no demasiado pero da la sensación al leerlo de estar leyendo un libro de historia, todo lo contrario que con El póker del mentiroso, que sigue hoy tan vigente como entonces. Me encanta el olfato que tiene ML para elegir los temas sobre los que escribe. elija lo que elija, hasta ahora, siempre me ha parecido el tema más interesante del mundo. En esta ocasión asistimos a la creación, ascenso y pinchazo de la burbuja de las puntocom desde primera fila, siguiendo la historia Este libro ha envejecido, no demasiado pero da la sensación al leerlo de estar leyendo un libro de historia, todo lo contrario que con El póker del mentiroso, que sigue hoy tan vigente como entonces. Me encanta el olfato que tiene ML para elegir los temas sobre los que escribe. elija lo que elija, hasta ahora, siempre me ha parecido el tema más interesante del mundo. En esta ocasión asistimos a la creación, ascenso y pinchazo de la burbuja de las puntocom desde primera fila, siguiendo la historia de Jim Clark, un emprendedor en toda regla que se forró secuencialmente con Sillicon Graphics, Netscape y Healtheon. Clark es un individuo curioso, con una ansia interminable por hacer cosas nuevas, que triunfó varias veces debido principalmente a la gran capacidad de convicción que tenía sobre inversores y colaboradores. Un personaje curioso. ML dedica un montón de páginas al Hyperion, el yate de Clark, que funciona en automático guiado por 25 ordenadores. La obsesión de Clark por su yate contribuye a que lo veamos como un bicho raro, efecto totalmente buscado por el autor. En resumen, el libro es bueno, está muy bien escrito, y el tema es interesante. Recomendable.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Quick read, like most of Michael Lewis' books, but it felt less engaging than others. But, despite this book being published over a decade ago, it's still relevant and provides a lot of interesting context for the beginnings of the tech industry as we know it today. One main takeaway was how Jim Clark helped to shift the startup value system to favor labor (founders) and their ideas/execution over capital (VCs), but that's only true for some companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) but not for others, Quick read, like most of Michael Lewis' books, but it felt less engaging than others. But, despite this book being published over a decade ago, it's still relevant and provides a lot of interesting context for the beginnings of the tech industry as we know it today. One main takeaway was how Jim Clark helped to shift the startup value system to favor labor (founders) and their ideas/execution over capital (VCs), but that's only true for some companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) but not for others, so this book is more a biography of Jim Clark than a complete history of Silicon Valley. Also, while I knew Jim Clark had founded Netscape, I hadn't known much about his involvement with Silicon Graphics or Healtheon (which later bought WedMD), which supports the idea that he really is unique in his sometimes blind grasp towards the next "new thing".

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shivam Sharma

    what Michael Lewis does not emphasize enough in this book (and he should have) is the fact that this is not just yet another story of from rags to riches but the story of just how the mania of the internet bubble came to existence in the 90s and how that influenced not just the traditional investors, wall street bankers and the silicon valley then new venture capitalists.... it shows u how the technicians, the coders, the hackers, the wizards, the architects of the new world who were supposed to what Michael Lewis does not emphasize enough in this book (and he should have) is the fact that this is not just yet another story of from rags to riches but the story of just how the mania of the internet bubble came to existence in the 90s and how that influenced not just the traditional investors, wall street bankers and the silicon valley then new venture capitalists.... it shows u how the technicians, the coders, the hackers, the wizards, the architects of the new world who were supposed to be building things that they believed in, rather started building whatever made them rich. kinda sad. and then you start to think "oh!!so this is where all the hell broke loose!!"

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mattaca Warnick

    The New New Thing chronicles a few years in the life of Jim Clark, billionaire founder of Netscape and Healtheon. Part biography, part internet success story, The New New Thing doesn't have the same focus as Moneyball or The Blind Side, meandering from Clark's various business successes to his obsession with building a computerized sailboat. The book would have benefited from a stronger narrative thread. Lewis's efforts to coin a phrase ("the new new thing") also fall flat. Ultimately, Clark is The New New Thing chronicles a few years in the life of Jim Clark, billionaire founder of Netscape and Healtheon. Part biography, part internet success story, The New New Thing doesn't have the same focus as Moneyball or The Blind Side, meandering from Clark's various business successes to his obsession with building a computerized sailboat. The book would have benefited from a stronger narrative thread. Lewis's efforts to coin a phrase ("the new new thing") also fall flat. Ultimately, Clark is a man who is never quite satisfied with what he has and always wants more. Reading his story unfortunately left me with the same sense of dissatisfaction.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Zarko

    I love Lewis' style of writing and have thoroughly enjoyed this book. My personal interest in Web and it's history was one of the reasons why I picked up this book in the first place and although it follows the career of one man, Jim Clark, the founder of Netscape, I still found it very interesting.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stefan Fergus

    3.5* - good, but not nearly as good as Flash Boys and The Big Short. Interesting stuff.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Arvind

    This book felt like a stylish AB De Villiers innings on a flat track against a weak bowling attack. It looks good but doesnt feel good as u know it lacks substance. And you have seen much better by AB. When I read GR reviews of this book earlier, I came across the same complaint :- This was Lewis' weakest, the style is good but it was unsatisfying. But, I read a couple of books by highly rated authors who called "Netscape" as something that really opened the floodgates of the Internet. And so, I This book felt like a stylish AB De Villiers innings on a flat track against a weak bowling attack. It looks good but doesnt feel good as u know it lacks substance. And you have seen much better by AB. When I read GR reviews of this book earlier, I came across the same complaint :- This was Lewis' weakest, the style is good but it was unsatisfying. But, I read a couple of books by highly rated authors who called "Netscape" as something that really opened the floodgates of the Internet. And so, I decided to pick up the story of Jim Clark, the guy who co-founded Netscape. Lewis is a man of finance, and in this book we get treated to the finances of the 3 companies that Clark founded repeatedly. After a while you can predict what Lewis is going to say next. The joys of technology or the details of what the companies themselves did to the world are absent. Instead you have minute details of Clark's pet-project ship "Hyperion" which were uninteresting and in the end I found myself speed-reading. Pick it up if you are a Lewis fan but avoid otherwise. There are better books on Silicon Valley.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ha Hoang

    Have always been a fan of Michael Lewis and this book did not disappoint! The story about one of the most active mind, “the least happy optimist in Silicon Valley”, from when he started his first company to when he stumbled and when he recovered. Through all ups and downs he managed to stay in touch with his determination and curiosity to fix things in this world.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Fab Mackojc

    Michael Lewis is a great storyteller but this one just didn't grab me as much as some of his other books have.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    It was interesting at points, but could have been much shorter.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Pete

    The New, New Thing (2001) by Michael Lewis looks at Jim Clark and the internet age. It’s one of a number of books including Nudist on the Night Shift and Triumph of the Nerds that looks at the first Dot-com Bubble in Silicon Valley. Jim Clark founded Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI) which was the computer company that brought real-time 3D graphics to the market. Clark laid out a chip called the geometry engine that was a VLSI design that performed matrix transformations, clipping and mapping a The New, New Thing (2001) by Michael Lewis looks at Jim Clark and the internet age. It’s one of a number of books including Nudist on the Night Shift and Triumph of the Nerds that looks at the first Dot-com Bubble in Silicon Valley. Jim Clark founded Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI) which was the computer company that brought real-time 3D graphics to the market. Clark laid out a chip called the geometry engine that was a VLSI design that performed matrix transformations, clipping and mapping and then created a company around the chip. SGI machines were used to create the computer graphics in Jurassic Park and SGI created OpenGL which became the first major standard 3D API. After founding SGI Clark helped found Netscape and became a billionaire. Lewis follows Clark after founding Netscape when he is building a huge computer controlled sailing boat called Hyperion and founding Healtheon, a startup that was intended to revolutionize health care by making billing more efficient. Clark is an amazing guy and Lewis paints a very full portrait of the person who grew up in poverty, was expelled from high school joined the navy and then became a physics professor before going on to found companies worth billions of dollars. The portrait of Silicon Valley at the time of the Dot-com Bubble isn’t quite as good. It’s a difficult time to cover because there were so many strange disasters and also the rise of huge companies like ebay, yahoo and Google. It’s definitely an enjoyable read and provides a remarkable picture of Clark and technological transformation at the turn of the millennium.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Peter L

    The 2nd of Michael Lewis's books I found via some excerpt in Vanity Fair or the New York Times that changed my life forever! His ability to tell a story while at the same time pulling out and discerning the key insights to his protagonist's success -in this case new Billionaire and Angel Investor Jim Clark fresh off of knocking one out of the park and shaping what we now cannot go without everyday -the internet- via his venture in Netscape! He shares many anecdotes and stories with the raw detail The 2nd of Michael Lewis's books I found via some excerpt in Vanity Fair or the New York Times that changed my life forever! His ability to tell a story while at the same time pulling out and discerning the key insights to his protagonist's success -in this case new Billionaire and Angel Investor Jim Clark fresh off of knocking one out of the park and shaping what we now cannot go without everyday -the internet- via his venture in Netscape! He shares many anecdotes and stories with the raw details behind the doors of silicon valley that demonstrate just how hard (yet easy) it became or could become for another if he/she finds such an insight and never gives up despite competition from all angles. His co-founder Marc Andreessen fresh off of Mosaic (I believe) and Jim Clark pioneer the software and some could argue "greater than software" web browser Netscape which leads them both to not only become near-billionaires from Netscape alone but forge the strategic partnerships with hardware and software companies that would become the business model of future like product launches and incubators for other leading additions to Netscape...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Glenn Conley

    After reading this book, I wanted to read everything Michael Lewis every wrote. Then, I found out he loves baseball, or some shit, and wrote a bunch of baseball books. Fuck that shit. Baseball sucks. But, this book is fucking awesome. Lewis weaves a thrilling tale, with fascinating characters, just like a novel. Of how the west was won. How did all those big start-ups succeed, and why did those epic failures fail. As an entrepreneur, I find this book absolutely thrilling. If you don't give a fuck After reading this book, I wanted to read everything Michael Lewis every wrote. Then, I found out he loves baseball, or some shit, and wrote a bunch of baseball books. Fuck that shit. Baseball sucks. But, this book is fucking awesome. Lewis weaves a thrilling tale, with fascinating characters, just like a novel. Of how the west was won. How did all those big start-ups succeed, and why did those epic failures fail. As an entrepreneur, I find this book absolutely thrilling. If you don't give a fuck about business, or start-ups, or tech in any way, you will probably find this book boring as fuck. But, for the rest of us, there's nothing better. It's a great, fun romp of a book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    ray

    The only value I see in this book is ... actually I see no value in this book. I bought this book for less then a dollar. I was ripped off. I apologize to planet Earth for my increased carbon footprint for buying and getting this book shipped to me. I had create a new shelf to categorize this book, garbage.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    I think I was on a quest to read every Michael Lewis book at the time I read this. Dude. This book was straight awful. I figured Michael Lewis + Silicon Valley = great novel. Wrong. I remember it was vaguely about technology beginning it's raise, but I swear half of the book about some rich douche and his sailing escapade. Do not read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Great read. True life. Great read. True life. Story holds your attention. Want to make One Billion dollars? Who doesn't? Jim Clark helped dozens of people become millionaires. See how.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gil Bradshaw

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was the story of Jim Clark's huge boat. Definitely Michael Lewis' worst book ever.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hao Deng

    After he is through, the author can see the reflection of himself off Clark's boots.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Trey

    Feels horribly outdated now - needs an epilogue dealing with the aftermath of the internet bubble. Not nearly as compelling or amusing as other Lewis books.

  28. 4 out of 5

    melissa

    Not as good as any of Lewis's other books.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vinothraj

    A few tidbits about Jim Clark, and Silicon Valley. That's the only good thing in this book. The rest is a bore about his yacht, and the healtheon venture.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    I think it would make more sense for me to have several billion dollars. I would enjoy it more.

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